Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
5 5
klcarne30

Intestinal Growling?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi! I'm not one to use forums, normally I like to keep my problems personal, but I'm in dire need of advice. I got diagnosed with celiac disease last month, so it's all fairly new to me. I've been gluten free now for 33 days, and I know that's not very long (definitely not long enough to see a drastic change in my symptoms), but my symptoms are persisting to the point where it's hard to concentrate on everyday life. I'm 17 years old, so my symptoms were never that extreme. My stomach, which I later learned was actually my small intestine, would growl----really loudly, to the point at which my teacher could hear it all the way across the room (yeah... embarrassing). I also got hiccups a lot and really bad acid reflux. I thought that after at least a month off of gluten I would see some change with my symptoms, but if anything, they've gotten more noticeable. I need some advice. If anyone else has ever experienced these symptoms, is there anything I can do to silence the growling besides wait six months to see if it ever stops?? It's just so embarrassing. 

Thanks for reading :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Talk to your doctor about starting either an H2 blocker or a Proton Pump Inhibitor (aka, PPI) in order to get your acid reflux under control. But make sure you get don't stay on either for an extended period of time so as to develop a dependency or other health problems related to suppressing stomach acid for long periods of time.

The other thing is to make sure you are truly eliminating gluten from your diet and not just cutting down on it. Studies show that most people who claim to be eating gluten free are actually eating low gluten. Check all processed food labels for gluten and learn how gluten is hidden in terminology like "malt flavoring." Realize that gluten is found in many things you would never suspect it to be in like most canned soups and even soy sauce and many chocolate syrups. Check your meds and supplements for gluten. It's quite an education process and it's tough for someone your age whose social life probably includes eating at fast food places with friends. Be very aware of cross contamination issues like french fries being cooked in the same vat with breaded chicken nuggets or non gluten containing foods being cooked on the same grill with a cheese sandwich; Using the toaster oven after someone has toasted wheat bread, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, trents said:

Talk to your doctor about starting either an H2 blocker or a Proton Pump Inhibitor (aka, PPI) in order to get your acid reflux under control. But make sure you get don't stay on either for an extended period of time so as to develop a dependency or other health problems related to suppressing stomach acid for long periods of time.

The other thing is to make sure you are truly eliminating gluten from your diet and not just cutting down on it. Studies show that most people who claim to be eating gluten free are actually eating low gluten. Check all processed food labels for gluten and learn how gluten is hidden in terminology like "malt flavoring." Realize that gluten is found in many things you would never suspect it to be in like most canned soups and even soy sauce and many chocolate syrups. Check your meds and supplements for gluten. It's quite an education process and it's tough for someone your age whose social life probably includes eating at fast food places with friends. Be very aware of cross contamination issues like french fries being cooked in the same vat with breaded chicken nuggets or non gluten containing foods being cooked on the same grill with a cheese sandwich; Using the toaster oven after someone has toasted wheat bread, etc.

Thanks so much for the quick reply! I will definitely talk to my doctor about the H2 blocker. Luckily my family has spent a lot of time immersed in our research to learn a lot about what you so kindly listed. I will continue to check my labels closely and make sure that I have fully eliminated gluten from my diet! Thanks again for your help! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are welcome and also let me welcome you to the forum.

Another thing to consider is that Celiacs often develop allergies and intolerances to non gluten foods. Soy and dairy intolerances/allergies seem to be the most common but it can be almost anything. Sometimes these go away after the gut has experienced healing with gluten-free eating. As you know by now I'm sure, the inflammation created by the disease in the small bowel creates a condition we refer to as "leaky gut." This allows larger than normal protein fragments from the food we eat to get into our blood stream where they may be interpreted as invading threats by the immune system. Another way of putting it is that Celiac Disease typically produces dysfunction in the immune system such that the body interprets normally harmless food items as harmful. 

Be aware also that about 10% of Celiacs react to oats like they do wheat/barley/rye. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'm looking into switching to lactose free options. I'm hoping to see some change with my symptoms once I stay off of it for a while. My doctor recommended that if I wanted to I could switch to lactose free milk, or cheeses that are low in lactose, etc. 

So I will give it a try! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would give yourself more time to heal.  I know, it is hard to be patient, but that is the way it is.  It took time to damage your gut and it will take time to heal.  Learning the gluten-free diet will take time too.  Consider keeping a food journal to help identify symptoms.  Like eating a lot of pinto beans three days in a row, can give you gas.  Cut back on lactose foods, but know that a lactose intolerance often resolves with healing.  Soon, you will be feeling so much better!  
 

 


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only places i trust are dedicated gluten free bakeries where they only make gluten free foods

and even those i dont trust 100% ..............................................................................................  but i have trust issues

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I did have an endoscopy. And I don't go out to eat much---the only two places I've gone to so far are 100% gluten free and run by Celiac patients. I will try to avoid packaging food and see if it helps, thank you! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter and I have a weird intolerance to both garlic and onions.  Besides GI problems, it activates our Acne Rosacea.  So, the evidence is clearly visible.  My daughter had a very hard time avoiding garlic and onion while at school.  She is home studying now and her face is amazingly clear.  No acne, acne rosacea, just glowing skin.  Hard to look at her older photos from Fall 2019.  
 

Keep that food and symptom journal.  While lactose is most common, other foods can get you.  Some resolve and other not. (We eat copious amounts of dairy now.)   My daughter is not willing to experiment with garlic and onions and neither am I.  Who wants to wear foundation?  

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klcarne30, 

Those rumbly tummy noises are called borborygmi.  I had them, too.  They're very embarrassing, I agree. 

Have you been checked for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3099351/

 

The Autoimmune Paleo Protocol diet helps starves out the bacteria which have grown up into your small intestine where they're not supposed be.  

The Autoimmune Paleo diet cuts out all sorts of carbohydrates which is what the bacteria feed on.  The AIP diet includes mostly meat and fresh veggies.  No dairy, no legumes (beans), no grains, no nightshades (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers and eggplants).

Without carbohydrates to feed them, the SIBO bacteria die off, and good bacteria take their place.  Carbohydrates can be added back slowly.  

The AIP diet helps promote healing, too.

And get checked for vitamin and mineral deficiencies.  Thiamine (Vitamin B1) usually helps keep the bacteria from overgrowing, but if you're low in thiamine, SIBO can become a problem.  

Ask your doctor about taking a B Complex vitamin supplement until you're feeling better.

And keeping a food/mood/poo'd journal is a good idea, too!

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@knitty kitty Thanks for the tips! I do not know if I've been checked for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth? I would assume that the endoscopy results would have shown that, but I don't know. My vitamin levels were all great! As for the diet, I would definitely have to discuss it with my doctor. She wants my vitamin levels to remain normal, which includes eating dairy, grains, etc. But it is great to know that other people have had this issue! Thanks for sharing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
5 5