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Ok, I've finally figured out how many Ns and how many Ks and the general order of the letters. Now for my next feat.....

How do you pronounce Kinnikinnick? Please someone who knows, give me a clue.

I've always said KINny kinick

:unsure::unsure::unsure:

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Ok, I've finally figured out how many Ns and how many Ks and the general order of the letters. Now for my next feat.....

How do you pronounce Kinnikinnick? Please someone who knows, give me a clue.

I've always said KINny kinick

:unsure::unsure::unsure:

Kin-Ick-Kin-Ick

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Guest Viola
Kin-Ick-Kin-Ick

You've got it Lori :D In case anyone wants to know, it's actually named after a plant. It's an evergreen that grows in the mountains in Canada. It has beautiful red berries and takes root in the cracks of rocks. It looks like a ground cover hanging over rock faces. Lovely plant, very much like Catoneaster for those who know plants.

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Ahhh, thank you all. And the extra bit of trivia is much appreciated, too....I had wondered.

One final question, which syllable(s) get the emphasis?

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From their site..

Before founding Kinnikinnick Foods, Ted was involved in environmental education and teaching programs. In teaching school groups about local flora and fauna, Ted found the story students remembered from year to year was the Kinnikinnick Story

Historically, Kinnikinnick or Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva ursi) has Kinniki-What???

Before founding Kinnikinnick Foods, Ted was involved in environmental education and teaching programs. In teaching school groups about local flora and fauna, Ted found the story students remembered from year to year was the Kinnikinnick Story Historically, Kinnikinnick or Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva ursi) has been an important plant for both wildlife and humans alike. The berries from this ground hugging bush last through winter when other fruits are gone and are especially important to black bears in the early spring when food is scarce. Native Americans used the leaves alone or with tobacco and other herbs. When it was mixed with tobacco, it was referred to as Kinnikinnick, from the Algonquin for mixture. When smoked in a sacred pipe, it is reputed to carry the smoker's prayers to the Great Spirit. A tea made from the leaves was used to treat urinary tract diseases, the leaves were powdered and applied to sores and the berries were made into a tea that was used to ward off obesity. The berries, which are very nutritious and high in vitamin C, were used during the winter months as an important supplement to their diet. They were fried or dried and used in pemmican. In searching for a name for a new business a number of objectives stand out. It should distinguish the company from other companies and be recognizable as different from the ordinary. It should be easy to remember (although not necessarily easy to spell). It should cause people to stop and think and to generate questions about the company. People are always inquiring about the origin of the name and this helps to strengthen our name and brand recognition. It should also have a symbolic meaning. The staples, like bread, are the leaves of the bush. The treats, like donuts, cookies, bagels and muffins, are the berries of the bush. And finally, the roots are the medicinal value since for the first time in their lives many of our clients have a variety of food that they know will contribute to their improved health. Kinnikinnick provides them with nutritious foods after their long cold winters of misdiagnosis and unsafe foods been an important plant for both wildlife and humans alike. The berries from this ground hugging bush last through winter when other fruits are gone and are especially important to black bears in the early spring when food is scarce. Native Americans used the leaves alone or with tobacco and other herbs. When it was mixed with tobacco, it was referred to as Kinnikinnick, from the Algonquin for mixture. When smoked in a sacred pipe, it is reputed to carry the smoker's prayers to the Great Spirit. A tea made from the leaves was used to treat urinary tract diseases, the leaves were powdered and applied to sores and the berries were made into a tea that was used to ward off obesity. The berries, which are very nutritious and high in vitamin C, were used during the winter months as an important supplement to their diet. They were fried or dried and used in pemmican.

In searching for a name for a new business a number of objectives stand out. It should distinguish the company from other companies and be recognizable as different from the ordinary. It should be easy to remember (although not necessarily easy to spell). It should cause people to stop and think and to generate questions about the company. People are always inquiring about the origin of the name and this helps to strengthen our name and brand recognition. It should also have a symbolic meaning. The staples, like bread, are the leaves of the bush. The treats, like donuts, cookies, bagels and muffins, are the berries of the bush. And finally, the roots are the medicinal value since for the first time in their lives many of our clients have a variety of food that they know will contribute to their improved health. Kinnikinnick provides them with nutritious foods after their long cold winters of misdiagnosis and unsafe foods

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Guest Viola

That's great Vincent, thanks for posting that! :D I just knew the bush from around here. It's a very atractive plant, and yes, the bears and birds do like the fruit :)

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Whenever I try to pronounce it I chicken out and say "Kinikawhateveritis"

Yeah she does, I heard her at a celiac meeting, and she said "kinikawhateveritis" and I said "you mean ka-nicky-nick" and she said "whatever"

Now, I will write a full legnth movie about the experience, it was moving. It will be shown at Tribecca and win an award. It will be called "glucose-free".

On a more serious note, I had to call them about an order the other day, and the nice lady that answered the phone said "Ka-nick-ka-nick, can I help you?" So I am guessing that THEY know how to say it, and that is what they said! :D

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Yeah she does, I heard her at a celiac meeting, and she said "kinikawhateveritis" and I said "you mean ka-nicky-nick" and she said "whatever"

Now, I will write a full legnth movie about the experience, it was moving. It will be shown at Tribecca and win an award. It will be called "glucose-free".

On a more serious note, I had to call them about an order the other day, and the nice lady that answered the phone said "Ka-nick-ka-nick, can I help you?" So I am guessing that THEY know how to say it, and that is what they said! :D

Right, because the world knows Celiacs must not eat glucose :lol:

Looks like you and 2Boys4Me are offering about the same pronunciation and majority rules! And, since the nice lady on the phone said so, it must be.

Woo Hoo!!! Thanks y'all. Good bye KinnyKinick....Hello Ka-nick-ka-nick

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The only time I refer to it is when I'm talking to my sister so we call it Knic Knac Patty whac bread. I hoped that they never ran out of it in the store where I had to actually inquire when it was coming in. Now I can breath relief I can come closer to the pronunciation.

Gail

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No, not Bob. It would get confusing because of Bob of the Red Mill fame.

Good point, but what if we spelled it backwards instad, you know like boB instead of Bob?

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Yeah she does, I heard her at a celiac meeting, and she said "kinikawhateveritis" and I said "you mean ka-nicky-nick" and she said "whatever"

Now, I will write a full legnth movie about the experience, it was moving. It will be shown at Tribecca and win an award. It will be called "glucose-free".

On a more serious note, I had to call them about an order the other day, and the nice lady that answered the phone said "Ka-nick-ka-nick, can I help you?" So I am guessing that THEY know how to say it, and that is what they said! :D

I think it should be a documentary in which a group of celiacs go across the country eating at restaurants, and record the hilarity that ensues.

I wish I had a video camera when the McDonald's chick in BFE Texas screamed "YOU DON'T WANT NO BUN?!?"

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Right, because the world knows Celiacs must not eat glucose :lol:

I know there are TONS of threads about stupid people....but I can't tell you how many times someone has said "glucose" after I just said "gluten".....and what gets me is that they don't say "Excuse me, I dont know what you're talking about, what is glu-ten?" They just say what soulds like something they know, glucose, and keep talking.......idiots.........

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You've got it Lori :D In case anyone wants to know, it's actually named after a plant. It's an evergreen that grows in the mountains in Canada. It has beautiful red berries and takes root in the cracks of rocks. It looks like a ground cover hanging over rock faces. Lovely plant, very much like Catoneaster for those who know plants.

Ahh, yet one more beautiful, fabulous, glorious thing that comes from Canada!!!

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