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Lexis

Low Bone Density

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Skipping is terrific!...Get a good sports bra... :)

Thanks, I noticed that... :D


Lee

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Sooo I think I got lost along they way... running on my treadmill good for bones or not?

It's the very best. Not so great for your joints, but superb for bone density... :)


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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Did you read my post above, about the resistance? I don't understand how this differs from weight training. True, there is no actual additional weight, but the force required to push against the resistance simulates the additional force of carrying weight. Just from the physics of it, it would seem similar to leg presses.

I do an upper-body program with free weights too, & my elliptical also has u-b bars. I'd like to see the data on ellipticals. I really suspect the resistance is crucial.

Leah

Most people I see on the elliptical have it on the lowest setting and seem to be doing it for aerobic exercise. I would think if you did it with more resistance it would be similar to weight bearing exercise. On the lower settings, since it's no impact, I would say it's not weight bearing. I have bad knees and shins, so I cannot run -- so I do the elliptical.

I also lift weights four days per week for 40 minutes.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Weight-bearing simply means you are bearing your weight, so anything other than swimming is considered weight-bearing. When an activity involves one foot always being in contact with the floor, it is considered low-impact. If at any time during an activity both feet (or both skis, in the case of downhill skiing) leave the ground at the same time (running, jumping) it is considered high-impact. When neither foot leaves the floor (or pedals, or elliptical blades), the activity is no-impact. Lots of no-impact activities provide a great deal of resistance, and can therefore be in keeping with a resistance workout with free weights or nautilus machines. They can also provide a great cardio--but in my own personal experience, I can only get my heart rate really up into my maximum training zone with high-impact stuff--running, aerobics, etc.


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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It's the very best. Not so great for your joints, but superb for bone density... :)

I agree that running is great for bone density due to the impact, but I'd argue that running on a treadmill is not so bad on your joints... A treadmill is a more forgiving surface that asphalt roads or concrete sidewalks, so it's actually better for your joints than running outside (unless you jog on the grass or dirt). I've been dealing with tendonitis and joint pain in my ankle, but being an avid runner, it's tough to give up running altogether. If I keep my running limited to the treadmill or other soft surfaces, then I don't have as much pain as running on the streets of NYC! Though I do miss those runs through Central Park :(

So keep running on that treadmill and build up some strong, healthy bones!


~Kerri

Diagnosed (positive Abs & biopsy): May 2004 at 24 years old

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artificial tracks (some high schools and colleges have them) are another good option.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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artificial tracks (some high schools and colleges have them) are another good option.

What about beach running? I know the its much harder (I have done it), but how does that compare?


- Vincent -

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What about beach running? I know the its much harder (I have done it), but how does that compare?

the sand absorbs much of the shock (much more than an artificial track), so I don't think it's actually as good at building bone density. realize, of course, that we're being nitpicky at this point. :D it's probably not worth the ankle risk unless you're on the damp sand either.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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