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melie

Help Me Understand The Whole Pots And Pans Thing...

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Hi all,

I am a bit confused re: the issue of pots and pans. Do I get my own, or is washing in hot soap and water sufficient, which is what I am currently doing. Does the type of pan matter? We have Calphalon, regular stainless steel and cast iron pans. Also, I read something about getting rid of wooden spoons? Can gluten really infiltrate them and survive a hot water washing? I have gotten myself my own toaster but don't know how stringent I need to be with other utensils if they're being washed, esp. in the dishwasher. Thanks for any tribal wisdom on this!


Diagnosed by Enterolab 6/06

Gluten free since 4/06

Autoimmune Thyroiditis since 1997

Pernicious Anemia

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As far as I understand from reading here. Stainless steel is good. Non stick is hard to get the gluten out if it's scratched, I think the same may be true for cast iron. I got rid of my cast iron and wooden utensils as well as some of the old plastic, like the colander and cooking spatulas.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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AndreaB summed it up rather well so ...

The only thing to add is that plain washing isn't enough.

You can scrub stainless steel with scouring pads and you need to throw away the scouring pads after touching gluten ... wooden spoons only cost cents anyway but what needs to be said is sticking things with gluten in a dishwasher contaminates everything else. Gluten is not alive so heat doesn't kill it ... although if you get it hot enough it will eventually turn into charcoal ....

I honestly think scouring pads and especially steel wool etc is a big problem since you scrub off the stuck on gluten ...

dishwashers ... well I know if I put coffee grounds in the dishwasher they get everywhere.... coffee grounds are just easier to see than gluten... specifically gluten is more or less insoluble in water the effect of sticking it in a dishwasher is pretty close to the process used to extract gluten when making wheat starch ... especially the alkalia wash process ... which is largely what dishwasher tablets are. In other words it washes the starch and leaves insoluble concentrated gluten.


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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Hi :)

As mentioned by Andrea, the problem with non stick pans is that gluten can get lodged in the scratches, and transfer to the food you're cooking.

Wooden utensils and cutting boards once used for gluten containing foods, you really need to replace. This goes for your collander, too. In both cases, it's impossible to get all of the gluten out of the tiny holes and cracks.

Stainless steel is fine--just scrub what you have well, and then run it through the dishwasher.

I actually got rid (donated/gave away) of all of my non stick cookware. We replaced it with stainless steel, and since I prepare all of our meals, don't use gluten on them at all. I kept one saucepan--just in case--and after 14 months, have not used it once!

I put all of our dishes in the dishwasher together--even if my husband or son has eaten, for instance, a regular bagel. I rinse everything well beforehand--so no crumbs get into the machine.

Don't forget to use a separate toaster and wash out the silverware holder!


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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Good advice from everyone here- the other thing I did that made a big difference was two sponges- one to wash off dishes that were gluten-free and one to wash off dishes that had gluten (color-coded) and it REALLY helped.

I DID buy new pots and pans because ours were old. I got a non-stick set at Linen's and Things for about $80 that had EVERYTHING I needed in it. And it was red which was my husband's warning sign that it was not to put gluten in. I figured buying a cheap set that could be replaced when it got scratches was probably the best way to go for me.

PS Love your picture and your name (honey?)


***************************

Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.

Albert Careb

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Being stubborn, I actually tested the "gluten sticking in teflon" theory.

Get rid of your pans. Even after multiple washings and cooking other things in them I was still getting glutened from my instant potatoes.

(After that I just assumed everyone on this board was smarter than I am and pretty much did everything they suggested).


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Being stubborn, I actually tested the "gluten sticking in teflon" theory.

Get rid of your pans. Even after multiple washings and cooking other things in them I was still getting glutened from my instant potatoes.

(After that I just assumed everyone on this board was smarter than I am and pretty much did everything they suggested).

I did the same thing, only with personal care products, Jestgar! I thought--no way am I going to care about this stuff, too....

But, I stood corrected (or should I say sat :unsure: ) :lol:


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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But, I stood corrected (or should I say sat :unsure: ) :lol:

:lol::lol::lol:

I just took everyone elses advice since I'm one that didn't have obvious symptoms. :P


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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I did the same thing, only with personal care products, Jestgar! I thought--no way am I going to care about this stuff, too....

I'm guilty of both: the kitchen and the personal products.

I think i've got the personal products all taken care of now. :D My next big project is replacing everything in my kitchen. My goal is to start my new year off with a completely gluten-free kitchen. Yippee!!


~Turtle~

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Guest Kathy Ann

Can I assume that if I have been washing all dishes (gluten ones included) in the dishwasher, seldom perfectly rinsed, sometimes reasonably rinsed and sometimes not rinsed at all (when the kids do the dishes), that I have probably been glutening myself on a daily basis? I'm also very allergic to dairy and eggs and those dishes have been going in there barely rinsed as well. Are most of us sensitive enough for that to be true? It makes me tired.

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Hi Kathy Ann,

It's best to rinse the crumbs off so they can't fly around the dishwasher and adhere to the dishes once dry.

I edited this because I thought I read washwater :blink:


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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Thank you everybody... I learned a lot! I guess new pots and sponges and spoons are in my very near future!


Diagnosed by Enterolab 6/06

Gluten free since 4/06

Autoimmune Thyroiditis since 1997

Pernicious Anemia

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