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The last few times I've made chicken, I think I've felt worse afterwards. I'm wondering, becuase almost all chickens these days say that they have been injected with broth or something - have any of you actually called companies about their chicken being gluten-free? Has anyone had any bad experience with chicken? Or, conversely, have you found that most fresh chicken is safe? I've bought Perdue's oven-stuffer roaster, whatever brand my store had of bone-in breasts, and . . . i dont know, feeling funny. Of course, if you'v read my posts, you know my house isnt gluten-free either . . .and i'm not known for my cleanliness . . . My grocery store does carry some 'natural' chickens, but they are half the size and twice the price of the over-stuffer . . . And i'm sure that wont change much when whole foods opens soon!

Any experiences?

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The last few times I've made chicken, I think I've felt worse afterwards. I'm wondering, becuase almost all chickens these days say that they have been injected with broth or something - have any of you actually called companies about their chicken being gluten-free? Has anyone had any bad experience with chicken? Or, conversely, have you found that most fresh chicken is safe? I've bought Perdue's oven-stuffer roaster, whatever brand my store had of bone-in breasts, and . . . i dont know, feeling funny. Of course, if you'v read my posts, you know my house isnt gluten-free either . . .and i'm not known for my cleanliness . . . My grocery store does carry some 'natural' chickens, but they are half the size and twice the price of the over-stuffer . . . And i'm sure that wont change much when whole foods opens soon!

Any experiences?

almost all chicken is safe, and those that aren't will say wheat under ingredients of injected chicken broth. the only chicken i've ever found to not be safe is that preseasoned stuff.

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The last few times I've made chicken, I think I've felt worse afterwards. I'm wondering, becuase almost all chickens these days say that they have been injected with broth or something - have any of you actually called companies about their chicken being gluten-free? Has anyone had any bad experience with chicken? Or, conversely, have you found that most fresh chicken is safe? I've bought Perdue's oven-stuffer roaster, whatever brand my store had of bone-in breasts, and . . . i dont know, feeling funny. Of course, if you'v read my posts, you know my house isnt gluten-free either . . .and i'm not known for my cleanliness . . . My grocery store does carry some 'natural' chickens, but they are half the size and twice the price of the over-stuffer . . . And i'm sure that wont change much when whole foods opens soon!

Any experiences?

I only buy kosher meats, and I don't know if non-kosher brands are different, but I've never had a problem with any raw poultry products (avoiding the obvious problems like chicken nuggets.)

I have, however, gotten sick from gluten contamination in the kitchen- breathing in flour, touching wet spaghetti that a child didn't clean up properly, etc. Touching dry gluteny crumbs doesn't seem to be a problem, but wet gluten on my fingers is problematic for me.

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First of all, thanks for the responses

Yeah, I've really been wondering about cc in my own kitchen . . . i havent used wheat flour to cook w at all in at least 2 months, but i'm handling gluten all the time. I was starting to get such raw hands, I got tired of washing my hands with soap every time i touched anything. Often when everyone is putting togehter their breakfasts and lunches, I try to just keep my stuff on a plate . . . but honestly, our counters dont even get washed every day, ugg.

Its not just cc tho. I quit rice and a few other things 2 weeks ago, and the other day my middle son caught me licking rice off my fingers! I hadnt even realized what I was doing! I spit it out and rinsed my mouth, but did it again off a spoon when I was putting the leftovers away. I do clean the chopping block before I prep a meal, but . ... uggg. I've been very tired and brain-foggy recently, and feeling overwhelmed by all the foods i'm avoiding, and other day-to-day stresses of motherhood . .. I've been trying to do better keeping the house clean for 15 years, and it hasnt worked yet . . . . grrr

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If you can't avoid handling gluteny stuff around the kitchen, try wearing rubber gloves while doing so. And maybe a face mask too, if you can't keep yourself from licking spoons! :lol:

Seriously, if you found yourself unconsciously licking rice spoons, you may have unconsciously licked something with actual gluten in it as well.

Try putting a paper towel down as a "placemat" before putting your plate down whenever you prepare food for yourself, then dump the paper towel and take a fresh one each time. Either don't keep your food out at the same time as theirs, or cover your food with another paper towel while theirs is out and moving around. This will minimize the chance of other's crumbs ending up in your food.

Being brain foggy can definitely be from gluten contamination. Yet it's hard to make the changes to "eat clean" during a reaction. I've found keeping the kitchen mostly gluten-free to be a sanity and health saver- I do still allow cold cereal and granola bars, as those don't make excessive crumbs. But if the kids want pasta, it's rice pasta for everybody. It's rice cakes instead of crackers, and popcorn instead of pretzels at snacktime. These changes aren't really costing me any more money (in fact the home popped popcorn is cheaper) and it's still simple, basic foods the kids like.

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Go to Costco and get those gloves meant to be worn for medical exams or diaper changes in daycare centers, etc. They are not very expensive and when you are done cleaning up, toss them. Before you put them on, put some lotion on your hands; it will soak in while you work! B)

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Tysons frozen chicken does not have any gluten. I've called to clarify that one.

Purdue I think it was only certain frozen chicken did not have gluten. Can't remember.

Actually, a bigger problem for me has been the number of times I find dairy/casein as an added hidden ingredient in the chicken. That has me very depressed. My youngest is extremely sensitive to dairy.

I use the rubber gloves for all the gluten containing breakfasts and luches. My hands break open and bleed on contact to gluten too. Here's what I do and maybe it will help you.

counters are constantly wiped off before and after food prep.

Paper towel is the gluten work surface.

Place the bread on the paper towels. Then make the sandwich. One hand handles the bread the other hand handles the gluten-free stuff. (We share the deli meat).

Cut the sandwich on the papertowel, wrap it up in the papertowel and put the whole thing in a zip lock bag.

Works for me. :rolleyes:

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If you can't avoid handling gluteny stuff around the kitchen, try wearing rubber gloves while doing so. And maybe a face mask too, if you can't keep yourself from licking spoons! :lol:

Thanks for the laugh, I needed that!!

But if the kids want pasta, it's rice pasta for everybody. It's rice cakes instead of crackers, and popcorn instead of pretzels at snacktime.

My husband has been ok so far with the changes but i've taken it slowly. He said to me yesterday, even, that he would not be ok with me arbitrarily saying, No bread in the house. Also, both he and my teen daughter are pretty aggressive about not eating my wierd foods - not tasting my pasta or other altered items.

I'll consider the glove thing . .. its so hard, I was always such a free spirit/hippy/SLOB . . lol . . i would eat food that fell on the ground, and claimed that my messy house insured my immune system was always in good shape . .. .this is really not my way, to be so very careful about things. It doesnt help that I dont have a dx, just a positive AL.C.A.T test. So I doubt myself.

Ok, i'm having a bad day, I'll stop babbling - thanks again for the advice and the laugh!

OK, just caught the last post . .. about training the family to make sandwhiches on a paper towel . . . sure, after I train them to empty their laundry baskets before I have to do laundry again . .. even if i refuse to do their laundry and make them do it themselves, they still wont put it away. Stubborn? Well, yeah, they come by it honest . . .

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You might consider removing the gluten from the kitchen. I live in a gluten limited household, basically bread and cereal. The gluten food is kept outside the kitchen in what I call a 'Sandwich Making Station". It contains a small refrigerator, a micorwave and a large kitchen cart along with kitchen utentsils, plates, bowls and flatware. It also contains the food items to make sandwiches and cereal.

Also, since I am in charge of the cooking I cook gluten free.

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I agree with you about the germs from the floor boosting the immune system- but not the gluten crumbs on the floor!

My kids don't see rice cakes as "hippy food"- they've grown up eating them.

While my 13yo will prepare her own food, she can only prepare what I've purchased. And she's old enough to understand why the kitchen needs to be mostly gluten-free, yet young enough to listen when I tell her the kitchen rules.

And I don't currently have a husband or another adult in the house, so I don't have to try to convince my partner to change his/her eating habits- it's my kitchen, my rules. It does make things easier.

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I know this thread is a little old but I just had a reaction to perdue's ground chicken with wonderful 'rosemary flavoring'. They say it's gluten free.....My symptoms and I disagree. But then again, it could be due to some other food contamination too.

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