Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I just found out that my little two-year old grandson had a high score on test for allergies to dairy and eggs. They'll now test him for celiac disease. They think there is a high probability he'll have that, too. I'm so sad for him, even though I'm sure his parents will make everything work. I'd love to know if anyone out there has a child with celiac and allergies to dairy and eggs. and how they make life work for their child. Any tips? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have those allergies neither does my child, but there is an egg replacer you can find at the health food store you can use in place of eggs that you would use in any recipe. You can also use 1 tablespoon of ground flaxseed mixed with 3 tablespoons of water to replace eggs in recipes.

For milk he can have soy milk. I heard that if you are intolerant to milk there is a high probablity that he will be intolerant to soy. If so, then he can drink rice milk (check labels for gluten) or almond milk (check labels for soy)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm gluten and dairy free, and can go long periods of time without eating eggs. Really, there are SO MANY foods out there that are WONDERFUL. Eliminating six foods from everything we can eat (wheat, barley, rye, oats, dairy, and eggs) means that he may not eat the same things you do, but he'll still have a wide variety of wonderful flavors to explore. Perhaps you can join him exploring the "unusual" foods that one might miss out on if they stick to just "the normal". :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. That's great news. I really appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just found out that my little two-year old grandson had a high score on test for allergies to dairy and eggs. They'll now test him for celiac disease. They think there is a high probability he'll have that, too. I'm so sad for him, even though I'm sure his parents will make everything work. I'd love to know if anyone out there has a child with celiac and allergies to dairy and eggs. and how they make life work for their child. Any tips? Thanks.

My daughter is in the same boat as well. We've been gluten, dairy and egg-free for over 5 years now. And it does get much easier to deal with over time.

The toughest thing to deal with is the fact that there are very few conventional foods that are safe. And school lunches? Forget it.

That being said, I can tell you that my daughter's friends prefer my cupcakes to theirs. I use The Gluten-free Pantry Decadent Chocolate Cake mix and substitute 1 cup of coconut milk + 1 TBSP lemon juice for the milk. And I then use 1/4 cup of unsweetened applesauce for each egg. I also use half applesauce, half oil where oil is called for. In sweet baked goods, applesauce, mashed banana or any pureed fruit can replace egg. In breads and non-sweet baked goods, Ener-G egg replacer, ground flax can both work. I also add unflavored gelatin to some items to help with binding.

The "worst" meal is breakfast. I've found that some vegan recipe sites can be really helpful to find alternative ways to make breakfast items. And for "cheese", you can often use ground cashews and/or nutritional yeast to help get that "cheesy" flavor. We have taken to eating some non-traditional foods for breakfast as well. Meatloaf for breakfast? Bring it on! LOL! It may be non-traditional....but if you think about it, it's better than the majority of cereals and breakfast bars being offered at the grocery store.

There are some tasty coconut-based yogurts as well as ice cream available as well. It's all about finding the alternatives that work for your family. I highly recommend a subscription to Living Without magazine to help get you started.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter is not celiac but is allergic to wheat. She was allergic to dairy and eggs. Has since outgrown them but has been told not to have them over twice a week now. So when I bake and cook, I generally do not use eggs or dairy. Mostly we reserve those things for meals out.

We use rice cheese for sandwiches and pizza. We get the vegan kind. It is soy free and dairy free. Not all rice cheese is dairy free so you have to check. For Parmesan we use a substitue from Allergy Foods. I get it online.

It is true that there is no safe school lunch. And other school things can be a pain. Seems there is always some occasion where there is food and she can't eat it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This Might help you

Allowed Foods

amaranth

arrowroot

buckwheat

cassava

corn

flax

Indian rice grass

Job

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much, all of you. This really helps. I'll pass this info on to his parents. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it possible for your grandson to go on a rotation diet for the food allergies? That way he will still get to eat those problems foods, but on a rotation basis. My son is on a rotation diet for his food allergies and it is working fine. He eats the offending food every 3 or 4 days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just found out that my little two-year old grandson had a high score on test for allergies to dairy and eggs. They'll now test him for celiac disease. They think there is a high probability he'll have that, too. I'm so sad for him, even though I'm sure his parents will make everything work. I'd love to know if anyone out there has a child with celiac and allergies to dairy and eggs. and how they make life work for their child. Any tips? Thanks.

What kind of symptoms does your grandson get when he eats those foods? If he had a "high score" on an allergy test then I'm guessing it was RAST (a blood test), but his parents need to consider his symptoms before deciding how careful they need to be. Just to give you an example...

My son is intolerant to dairy and has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn. Peanuts will send him into anaphylaxis (hives, vomiting, wheezing, etc...), so we're very, VERY strict about avoiding them. A taste of peanuts could mean a trip to the ER. Corn, on the other hand, is a totally different story. Corn gives him eczema and digestive symptoms, but it's not a life-threatening allergy. If he gets a little taste now and then, no big deal. His pediatric allergist told us that researchers at Tulane did a study on corn allergies recently and found that corn is very unlikely to cause anaphylaxis. So... it's a great candidate for a rotation diet (although we haven't tried that yet).

Although it caused pretty bad symptoms (eczema, vomiting, green diarrhea with streaks of blood), the dairy (casein) intolerance is something our son might actually grow out of. We're supposed to start giving him a little dairy starting at 18 months (coming up soon!) to see if he can tolerate it... the idea is that maybe his system just needed extra time to start making the appropriate enzymes. An enzyme deficiency is a LOT different from having an allergy. (BTW... we also have him off gluten as a precaution... he eats a lot of rice, meat, fruits and vegetables :)... quite the healthy diet for a little boy.)

Anyway... good luck! It might not be as hard as you think to change your grandson's diet. In my experience, after a few months it becomes second nature.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 3 yr old DD is anaphylactic to eggs and nuts, and minimally to wheat, dairy, pork, beef and the cacao bean - the later is included minimally in her diet as the reaction so far has been limited to bad excema - so far. Be careful because allergy testing does not indicate the level of reaction because that next or the 10th exposure might be worse than excema - my DD is attached at the hip to her epi pen and antihistamine for that reason.

anyway - we have just completed the blood test today for Celiac - while I can't begin to imagine adding in such a major to the restricted diet she already has, I never thought I would have survived this far and as daunting as going gluten free would be I know we can get through it.

It is really important to read read read labels on food everytime you food shop and from what I have learned the hard way - just because egg or another allergen is not in one brand doesn't mean it is not in another of the same food. Also it is important to learn what egg (and other allergens) can also be called in labelling - who would have known egg could have so many other names!!!

On a positive note - I do not know any other 3 yr old who knows such a great variety of fruit and veges even if she doens't like them all (LOL but she tried and thats whats important)

good luck - knowledge is power and what helps me sleep better at night :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×