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Lynayah

Which Cookware To Keep, Discard?

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Hi,

For gluten-free management, which cookwear should I keep and which should I discard?

I am told that if I can find a friend with a self-cleaning oven, I can have my cast iron cookwear self-cleaned and still use it . . . true?

What about plastic containers?

Cutting boards, I know I need a dedicated one - is it also true for plastic cutting boards that have been dishwasher cleaned?

Thank you!

Lyn

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Hi,

For gluten-free management, which cookwear should I keep and which should I discard?

I am told that if I can find a friend with a self-cleaning oven, I can have my cast iron cookwear self-cleaned and still use it . . . true?

What about plastic containers?

Cutting boards, I know I need a dedicated one - is it also true for plastic cutting boards that have been dishwasher cleaned?

Thank you!

Lyn

Oh geez I never thought about the cutting boards and plastic tupperware.

My mother once read that teflon is a no no NOT because it's bad but because it absorbs stuff from glutenous stuff cooked on it and can get into any food cooked thereafter...but for how long I don't know or even if it's true in all cases.

I too would like a followup on this. Hubby is getting frustrated now because starting monday I will cut him off from giving me kisses after taking swigs of his beer. ugh.

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I am one of those who put the cast iron in the oven on self-clean and dedicated it gluten-free from then on. The self cleaning process makes a mess but works great. Don't use any cleaners, just the heat from the oven-it blasts everything to dust. Wash really well afterwards and re-season according to the manufacturerer's directions, which is coating with oil and another trip to the oven.

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I dont know if this helps, but a book I'm reading, "gluten free cooking for dummies" says that the whole thing about plastic storage containers holding gluten is a myth. The authors say to just wash them and they are fine.

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I dont know if this helps, but a book I'm reading, "gluten free cooking for dummies" says that the whole thing about plastic storage containers holding gluten is a myth. The authors say to just wash them and they are fine.

Oh thank GOD, seriously.

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You need a new toaster. Toasters collect crumbs and it is impossible to adequately clean one.

Plastic containers and teflon pans that are scratched are suspect. Small amounts of gluten may be stuck in the scratches. If you are worried, replace them for your peace of mind. In my belief, any container whose surface is smooth and that has been thoroughly washed (I think the dishwasher is thorough) should be safe.

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You need a new toaster. Toasters collect crumbs and it is impossible to adequately clean one.

Plastic containers and teflon pans that are scratched are suspect. Small amounts of gluten may be stuck in the scratches. If you are worried, replace them for your peace of mind. In my belief, any container whose surface is smooth and that has been thoroughly washed (I think the dishwasher is thorough) should be safe.

OMG the toaster!!! :o Hubby is going to freak, lol!

And yes you are right about the teflon pans that are scratched :) I forgot that one detail.

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For myself, I've found that hand washing scratched "pre-gluten free" cutting boards and teflon pans does not do the job well enough--still got symptoms from using them. Silverware and knives (except serrated) are okay to handwash as long as I can scrub all the surfaces, meaning I don't trust handwashing my forks, as I can't scrub between the tines.

That said, I've had great luck soaking kitchen items in a 1:2 solution of bleach & water for 15-20 minutes or so. This denatures & oxidizes any protein or organics that might be hiding in scratches/etc. I've also done this with my "pre-gluten free" immersion blender stick--the detachable/washable part (I soaked it for over an hour, just to be sure to get everything inside). I've used it since, and no symptoms. :D

After treating with bleach, rinse well and dry. Let it sit dry for a couple days. Any remaining chlorine will evaporate. Alternatively, try using a dechlorinator for aquariums, usually just a solution of sodium thiosulfate. 1/2-1 teaspoon per gallon of rinse water should do the trick--after rinsing, dip the items in this briefly, then rinse again and dry. Good to go!

For cast iron skillets, I used the oven cleaning cycle that missy'smom described. This should carbonize any protein residue.

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If you have a handheld mixer, take a look inside the vents-see flour? It's impossible to get it out. You'll need a new one. Deep fryers are usually impossible to clean well enough and mine was non-stick inside so couldn't be scrubbed without damaging it so out it went and in came a new one-dedicated gluten-free.

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You need a new toaster. Toasters collect crumbs and it is impossible to adequately clean one.

What about toaster ovens? I scrubbed the rack and then laid foil on top of it. If I need to toast something for my boyfriend I'll just remove the foil and then replace it later. I thought that would do the trick. No?

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What about toaster ovens? I scrubbed the rack and then laid foil on top of it. If I need to toast something for my boyfriend I'll just remove the foil and then replace it later. I thought that would do the trick. No?

For myself, it's too complicated to clean adequately, and my wife thinks I'm anal-lytical. I was doing the same as you described, but still had infrequent cc events--not sure if it was crumbs popping about from grease splattering? Moisture coming in contact with oils in a hot place can do that.

So for convenience, I'm trying to implement having an entire counter that is gluten-free, including toaster oven. It's tough being the only gluten-free in a mixed household.

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If you are going to do any gluten-free baking, you want to look at your baking tins, trays, and pans. Dark-colored pans will brown gluten-free baked goods too quickly. You will want to replace any dark-colored baking tins with light-colored ones. Trust me, it makes a difference.

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Oh my gosh, these are all such excellent tips! Thank you.

I have found that I cannot use my convection/toaster oven. It is old and impossible to clean completely. I am highly sensitive, and each time I've tried to broil meat in it, I get a reaction.

I'm feeling pretty good this week and don't want to experiment with my regular oven right now. My regular oven worries me. I do not have a self-cleaning oven, and frankly, I'm not the greatest at routinely cleaning it, other than wiping up spills, keeping the glass clean, etc. I know if I make something in a safe covered dish it will be okay, but roasting or baking without a lid has me a bit concerned. Any thoughts on this?

Here's what I've done in the meantime: Yesterday, I purchased a Hamilton Beach 22-quart stainless steel electric roaster oven (you can bake in it, too -- cakes, etc.). I bought it for only $39.95 at COSTCO.

This was an outstanding price. These usually retail for over $70!

They were on display on an end cap, which may mean the oven is a temporary item only. If you're looking for one, call first, perhaps.

I roasted a chicken in it last night, and it was sooooo moist and flavorful -- really, really, REALLY good.

It will be a dedicated oven. Mine, all mine!

What I love about it is that you never put the food directly on cooking surface. Instead, you use your own cook and bakeware, which makes the oven MUCH easier to clean. The inside cook service is removable, and it also has a rack.

The darn thing is huge and takes a lot of space, but I know it will be worth it. It is large enough to roast a turkey and also easily holds large casserole dishes, etc.

Food, food, glorious FOOD!

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