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What Is Your Favorite gluten-free Cookbook?

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Hey everybody,

I have a $25 gift certificate to a bookstore and was wondering which gluten-free cookbook you like best and actually USE?

Any suggestions?

Thanks so much!

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I use regular cookbooks and just replace the gluten free items. Sorry I don't know any good gluten free cookbooks. I'm sure after the holidays plenty of people will give you suggestions for cookbooks.

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I use regular cookbooks and just replace the gluten free items. Sorry I don't know any good gluten free cookbooks. I'm sure after the holidays plenty of people will give you suggestions for cookbooks.

I'm not sure if I'm good enough at substitutions to do that yet. Hopefully someday...

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This is one book I would not be without.

http://www.elanaspantry.com/cookbook/

Not only gluten-free and many are DF.... its also low GI and high protein...

Looks good! Are all of the recipes for almond flour? It's pretty expensive where I shop.

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Hey everybody,

I have a $25 gift certificate to a bookstore and was wondering which gluten-free cookbook you like best and actually USE?

Any suggestions?

Thanks so much!

I'm new to the whole gluten free thing, I was only diagnosed a little over a week ago, but a friend gave me 1000 Gluten-Free Recipes by Carol Fenster. So far I have made the pizza crust and an Indian chicken dish. Both were very good. I plan to make the yellow cake recipe this week for my daughter's birthday cake.

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It depends on what you are looking for. I just got the Biggest Loser Family cookbook because I have two kids and husband to cook for. Most of them are high in protein, and require only minor substitutions (don't worry, that part of this is easy). I also got the George Stella Livin' Low Carb (I think that is the title) and they use primarily soy flour for their substitutes, but you could certainly use others.

If you are just looking for meals, almost any cookbook that focuses on healthier eating would probably suit you. If you are looking for desserts and cakes and breads, I would get something that focuses on gluten-free.

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Thanks for all of the comments. I have been eating gluten-free for a long time, but winging it when I cook.

What I am looking for are names of cookbooks that are gluten-free that YOU USE and LOVE! I don't want to experiment buying another cookbook I'll never use. A wide variety of things is ok. Yes, probably focusing mostly on baking.

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Depends if you have any other intolerances. I bought a bunch of gluten free cookbooks and really liked Bette Hagman's The Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread, and then found out I was intolerant of potato starch!! :o So it was back to substituting again. I don't do soy either and don't like the taste of the bean flours. Purple eventually helped me settle on a blend of sorghum, tapioca and rice flours mostly, although I do use also buckwheat and some quinoa.and coconut flour. I find that the authors of gluten free cookbooks tend to have their favorite flour mixes and stick with them, which is why I mention if you have other intolerances or preferences.

P.S. i have got most of my best recipes off this forum, lol.

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The only gluten-free cookbook I use is Bette Hagman's The Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread and I really just use it as a reference for converting other recipes, etc.

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Depends if you have any other intolerances. I bought a bunch of gluten free cookbooks and really liked Bette Hagman's The Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread, and then found out I was intolerant of potato starch!! :o So it was back to substituting again. I don't do soy either and don't like the taste of the bean flours. Purple eventually helped me settle on a blend of sorghum, tapioca and rice flours mostly, although I do use also buckwheat and some quinoa.and coconut flour. I find that the authors of gluten free cookbooks tend to have their favorite flour mixes and stick with them, which is why I mention if you have other intolerances or preferences.

P.S. i have got most of my best recipes off this forum, lol.

I avoid msg and oats b/c they give me headaches and indigestion.

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Roben Ryberg's "You Won't Believe It's Gluten Free" is great. especially if you have intolerances other than gluten. Carol Fenster or Bette Hagman both are great writers. I have one book from each author and i use them both often for baking. That first one is the book i use most because she developed recipes using one or two alternative flours which makes things much easier. good luck searching!

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Hey everybody,

I have a $25 gift certificate to a bookstore and was wondering which gluten-free cookbook you like best and actually USE?

Any suggestions?

Thanks so much!

Anything by Carol Fenster, Annalise Roberts, Elizabeth Barbone or Roben Ryberg.

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Anything by Carol Fenster, Annalise Roberts, Elizabeth Barbone or Roben Ryberg.

Well, friends, I decided on two authors Roberts and Barbone. Am looking forward to getting them :)

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Well, friends, I decided on two authors Roberts and Barbone. Am looking forward to getting them :)

You won't be disappointed.

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I agree about Roben Ryberg.

richard

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Roben Ryberg's "You Won't Believe It's Gluten-Free!" cookbook has been a lifesaver. Hubby has multiple allergies in addition to being gluten-intolerant (self-diagnosed) so having recipes that use a single flour instead of a blend had saved my sanity.

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I also recommend "You Won't Believe It's Gluten-Free!" by Roben Ryberg. I just got it actually, because all the recipes in the cookbook my mother got me for Christmas were extremely complicated, and required like 4-5 flours per recipe.

In Roben's book, all the recipes I looked at had only one flour. And it offers variations for people with multiple allergies. Because I just got it I've only made the corn based banana bread (which was delicious) and the potato based sweet muffins (also delicious, want one?) Its just me, so I had to restrain myself from making like 5 different things at once because it wouldn't get eaten that way. I can't wait to make more recipes from the book.

And the flours used are inexpensive, the 4 flours I've seen are corn starch, potato starch, rice flour, and oat flour. Some of the recipes are dairy free as well.

I think the big difference is that Roben doesn't have to be gluten free. She can eat gluten, but chooses not to. I read her introduction in the book. So the things I've made don't taste like what you think banana bread tastes like, because you haven't eaten it in forever, it tastes like the banana bread my mom used to make all the time. So far everything has been very light too, I haven't eaten much gluten-free baked things, but they often seem really heavy and dense but the things I've made so far aren't like that at all.

I can't wait to make the monkey bread recipe in there!

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I also recommend "You Won't Believe It's Gluten-Free!" by Roben Ryberg. I just got it actually, because all the recipes in the cookbook my mother got me for Christmas were extremely complicated, and required like 4-5 flours per recipe.

In Roben's book, all the recipes I looked at had only one flour. And it offers variations for people with multiple allergies. Because I just got it I've only made the corn based banana bread (which was delicious) and the potato based sweet muffins (also delicious, want one?) Its just me, so I had to restrain myself from making like 5 different things at once because it wouldn't get eaten that way. I can't wait to make more recipes from the book.

And the flours used are inexpensive, the 4 flours I've seen are corn starch, potato starch, rice flour, and oat flour. Some of the recipes are dairy free as well.

I think the big difference is that Roben doesn't have to be gluten free. She can eat gluten, but chooses not to. I read her introduction in the book. So the things I've made don't taste like what you think banana bread tastes like, because you haven't eaten it in forever, it tastes like the banana bread my mom used to make all the time. So far everything has been very light too, I haven't eaten much gluten-free baked things, but they often seem really heavy and dense but the things I've made so far aren't like that at all.

I can't wait to make the monkey bread recipe in there!

Pssst! Those potato-starch based muffins freeze REALLY well...I make different flavors for me and my husband and freeze the extras so we have a variety available. :rolleyes: I know, I know, it's dangerous tip! :D

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My bad for not going to a bookstore to preview before buying from another source. Unfortunately, I will return them both as the primary flour they both use is brown rice flour which I dislike. My bad for not mentioning that, I suppose; however, with all of the variety of flours out now, i was shocked that two cookbooks would lean so heavily on one flour...and brown rice flour at that.

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My bad for not going to a bookstore to preview before buying from another source. Unfortunately, I will return them both as the primary flour they both use is brown rice flour which I dislike. My bad for not mentioning that, I suppose; however, with all of the variety of flours out now, i was shocked that two cookbooks would lean so heavily on one flour...and brown rice flour at that.

Well, don't say I didn't warn you :P In post #10 :rolleyes: Sorry, I just couldn't resist :ph34r:

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Well, don't say I didn't warn you :P In post #10 :rolleyes: Sorry, I just couldn't resist :ph34r:

Mushroom, you are correct, LOL!!!!!! Actually, upon further reflection, most of Barbone's recipes use white rice flour which I LOVE, so that one will be fine. In Roberts's cookbook, she give three flour mixes, but writes all of her recipes to use the brown rice flour mix. In the intro section, she slips in a sentence in an obscure part that says you can use all three mixes (2 and 3 are sorghum/millet) in her recipes. So, I MAY be able to keep that one, also. Whole Foods nor Wal-mart carries millet flour here in Indy, so I'm not sure how that tastes.

I like sorghum, white rice, and a little buckwheat, too.

Question: Have you substituted buckwheat flour for millet flour or any other flour? If so, how did it turn out?

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Mushroom, you are correct, LOL!!!!!! Actually, upon further reflection, most of Barbone's recipes use white rice flour which I LOVE, so that one will be fine. In Roberts's cookbook, she give three flour mixes, but writes all of her recipes to use the brown rice flour mix. In the intro section, she slips in a sentence in an obscure part that says you can use all three mixes (2 and 3 are sorghum/millet) in her recipes. So, I MAY be able to keep that one, also. Whole Foods nor Wal-mart carries millet flour here in Indy, so I'm not sure how that tastes.

I like sorghum, white rice, and a little buckwheat, too.

Question: Have you substituted buckwheat flour for millet flour or any other flour? If so, how did it turn out?

Carol Fenster's books rely on a sorghum, potato starch, tapioca flour blend. You might want to check her out if you like sorghum flour.

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I have to agree with others here. It's Roben Ryberg's "You Won't Believe It's Gluten Free" that I find is the book I've been turning to most as of late. Her pizza crust and cakes come out perfect almost every time for me. I also use Roben's first book but not as much.

Also Carol Fenster's 1000 recipes and Quick and Easy books are my fall back books I use for recipes Roben doesn't have. They all come out fantastic as well.

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