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I'm newly diagnosed with intolerances to gluten and casein (allergic dermatitis, poss DH) and I'm in the process of going through my kitchen and getting rid of anything with the offending substances. I'm not quite done yet, but it looks like I'm going to have to get rid of alot of things, and basically start from scratch. What are examples of food staples for someone eating gluten-free/CF? At the moment, all I have that I know I can eat is gluten-free pasta, fresh veggies/fruits, rice, soy milk. I'm hoping to run to the store tonight after work to stock up on stuff. I'm especially interesting what sort of baking supplies I should get.

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I'm newly diagnosed with intolerances to gluten and casein (allergic dermatitis, poss DH) and I'm in the process of going through my kitchen and getting rid of anything with the offending substances. I'm not quite done yet, but it looks like I'm going to have to get rid of alot of things, and basically start from scratch. What are examples of food staples for someone eating gluten-free/CF? At the moment, all I have that I know I can eat is gluten-free pasta, fresh veggies/fruits, rice, soy milk. I'm hoping to run to the store tonight after work to stock up on stuff. I'm especially interesting what sort of baking supplies I should get.

If you follow something close to the phase 1 and 2 of the south beach diet, you'll be darn close. Potatoes, corn chips, check out the gluten free aisle of your nearest grocery/health store.

Here's my story on baking: I've gotten very, very lucky. Pretty much everything I've made has been yummy. I bought Tom Sawyer's flour mix (it was between that and better batter, and thus far, I'm not disappointed) which I cut halvsies with sorghum depending on the recipe. Tom Sawyers can be very slightly gritty, which I really like...but it doesn't go with every recipe. With cookies, though, it gives them real texture, which is my preference. I use that flour mix in everything. It already has the xantham gum in it, so you don't have to add it like you usually have to for alternative flours. Every thing I've made has been amazing, and people have no idea that it is gluten free. So that's my story. :)

I wouldn't worry about baking in the beginning though. Get comfortable with your regular cooking and treats, and then start experimenting. It's a lot to get into all at once...I spread it out, and the past six months have been a blast!

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I just started with rice and potatoes and gluten-free pasta as my carbs and added in baked goods or other products as I was up to it. Namaste makes mixes that are gluten-free/CF. Vegan Gourmet makes a block "cheese" that's gluten-free/CF. The Glutino crackers are gluten-free/CF(plain variety at least). Gillian's French Bread rolls and Raisin Rolls are gluten-free/CF. Pamela's Bread mix is gluten-free/CF.

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I don't do a lot of baking, but tend to follow regular recipes with gluten-free flour substituted (particularly a combo of sorgum, millet, and brown rice).

As for staples, I pretty much go for naturally gluten free whole foods - fruits, vegetables, gluten-free grains (millet, quinoa, buckwheat, rice), legumes (lentils, beans), eggs (they're not dairy), and meats. So, staples that aren't those things are things like vinegar (usually balsamic or apple cider or red wine), olive oil, gluten-free tamari (San-J), regular spices, bouillon, peanut butter, jam. There are probably a couple others, but that's the regular staples I've got. Mostly, it's just about cooking regular food, but making food that's regularly gluten-free. There's really a whole heck of a lot out there.

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The same advice that gets handed out to folks everyday works great for the gluten free foods - shop the perimeter of the store, stick to foods with single ingredients, and try to make as much of it fresh as possible.

One piece of advice I WOULD give? Find some easy things to keep on hand at all times to snack on. Nuts (if not allergic), popcorn, fresh fruit, etc. I wouldn't even really bother at first with the gluten free convenience foods for the most part. You never have to worry reading a label for gluten if you're munching on an apple! lol.

There are also some great non-specialty items to keep on hand. Rice chex, corn chex, even the chocolate chex are gluten free (and a LOT cheaper than most of the specially made gluten free cereals that the health food sections try to sell you!)

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Lots of fresh fruits and veggies, if you are not allergic or intolerant.

You can bring a bag of carrots with you and munch on them throughout the day.

Leave the processed food to when you have gotten used to being off the gluten and leave the gluten-free replacer goodies

from that too. Or use them as treats. Just don't reply on them. Gums, esp. guar gum, can irritate your system.

Oh yes, and drink a good amount of water. Your body needs water.

Aside from that, take what you liked when you eating gluten and see if you can do healthy, gluten-free substitutions. But really stay very close to your fruits and veggies.

~Allison

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These are my weekly staples:

Fresh or frozen fruits and veggies

Lean meat

Rice

Rice pasta

Rice cakes (Lundberg farms are my favs)

Beans or lentils

Quinoa

Pamela's baking mix

Peanut or other nut butter

Hummus

Chips (I like Food Should Taste Good Olive chips)

Almond milk

Chex (chocolate makes a good dessert snack!)

Larabars

Kind Bars

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