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coastiewife01

Eating For Long Workouts

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I am newly diagnosised with celiac(less than a month) and I love to cycle. I find myself in a scared to eat phase. I always had protien bars with me to fuel up. Now I am having a hard time eating properly when before and during long rides(50 plus miles). Last time I took a ziploc full of peanut butter, took 10 miles to choke it down :rolleyes: I would love to have some pre-riding and during ride meal/food ideas. Thanks...misty

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purefit bars! You only need a 1/6 of a bar to get 3g protein, and it's a lot less fat than PB. I think it is supposed to be easy to digest. I used them in training and during my ironman last year. I understand that scared to eat phase... Before a ride I usually have a gluten free bagel from the sensitive baker, but if you are not in So Cal, Udi's makes one too. I put PB on THAT before heading out the door. :) Gu is gluten free, as is gatorade, although neither have any protein... Hope this helps!!


Diagnosed celiac 2002

Diagnosed lymphocytic colitis 2003

Casein free

Love baking/cooking

Love triathlons

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I went on a bike trip once. Three weeks long and about 70 km per day (about 40 miles a day). This was 3 years ago (I've only discovered gluten free heaven in the past month). I had a snack mix bag full of peanuts, raisins, dried cranberries and other goodies found in the bulk food bins. I can only imagine the horror of going in that store now and wondering what poison is in each and every one of those bins. I'm sure you could buy bags of random tasty things like nuts, raisins etc that have never touched gluten... even if it means shelling the nuts prior to your ride. Nuts are way easier to munch on the ride than a big spoon full of peanut butter (yeck!)


Self diagnosed as gluten free as all tests were negative and the doctor was completely useless.

Gluten Free since June 2010

Suspecting soy and milk as of June 2011

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Some Tiger's Milk bars are gluten free. You can eat Peanut Butter, Protein Rich, or Peanut Butter and Honey flavors. The Peanut Butter Crunch flavor has gluten. Kind bars, Larabars, and Nature Valley Nut Crunch bars are also gluten-free.

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When I go on long hikes or backpacking trips, I take plenty of energy bars (look around, you'll find a number that have a decent amount of protein, even if you're also trying to avoid dairy, though that makes it harder), dried fruit, nuts, and beef jerky (there aren't a lot that are gluten free, but some are, including Whole Foods' house brand). You can also invest in a dehydrator and make your own foods (or bake your own energy bars).


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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Thank you everyone! My nerves are getting the best of me, I am riding my first century tomorrow(100 miles) and I want to get the best foods for my body to keep me fueled up.

It is all so new to me-the couple of bars that I have tried were so nasty...I would be better off eating the wrapper.

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Cold peeled potatoes give a good shot of carbs and antioxidants without too much fiber. I've used them pre-run and got the idea from cyclists. I usually just make sure I have protein afterwards tho, not during. Maybe have some turkey with them, or a hard boiled egg...?

The peanut butter larabars are higher in protein than the other flavors, and I like them a lot, but they aren't high in protein. I've made my own with date paste, nut butters, other fruit/nuts/seeds and flavoring. I imagine you could add sources of protein to the mix if you wanted. I've used chick pea flour and powdered milk. Soy flour, whey protein, or even that weird green stuff might work too. You just throw everything in a food processor and mix until the consistency is good. And... if you want to replicate... measure. Wrap in plastic, waxed paper, or foil. Probably cheaper than buying bars.

YouBar might be something to check out. I once ordered some, but don't know how gluten-free friendly they are.


2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable

3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG

4/2010 Negative biopsy

5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)

5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?

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Thank you everyone! My nerves are getting the best of me, I am riding my first century tomorrow(100 miles) and I want to get the best foods for my body to keep me fueled up.

It is all so new to me-the couple of bars that I have tried were so nasty...I would be better off eating the wrapper.

I'm not sure if you'll see this but I'm wondering how your ride went? What did you eat? I'm going to start riding longer distances in a few weeks but what to eat remains a real puzzle. (I can't eat dairy, tree nuts, food preservatives).

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I bike about 15 miles/day commute on my mountain bike. Lara bars are great for longer rides, or even just grapes or other fruit. Gatoraid is gluten-free, but tends to get sticky if the water bottle or camelback leaks. Good to eat protein before the rides, such as eggs. I've noticed that I'm building more muscle now that I'm gluten-free, than before (gluten-free since getting sick last fall). I suspect your energy levels will also increase through time now that you are gluten-free. Have a great ride.

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Me too! I'm building a lot more muscle now that I'm gluten free and it's only been 6 months. Kind of odd given how much time I've spent wanting to build muscle and it not happening. On the flip side I also gain weight now..I got so dependent on snacking to keep my energy up, and my energy levels are still changing so it's hard to sort that out. I hope that changes soon, it's frustrating.

I can't eat eggs (allergy?) or drink gatorade (chemical sensitivity) But Lara bars sound good.

cheers to you for commuting on your bike :)

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Cold peeled potatoes give a good shot of carbs and antioxidants without too much fiber. I've used them pre-run and got the idea from cyclists. I usually just make sure I have protein afterwards tho, not during. Maybe have some turkey with them, or a hard boiled egg...?

thanks for the potato suggestion - I've never heard it. It could work!

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When I go on long hikes or backpacking trips, I take plenty of energy bars (look around, you'll find a number that have a decent amount of protein, even if you're also trying to avoid dairy, though that makes it harder), dried fruit, nuts, and beef jerky (there aren't a lot that are gluten free, but some are, including Whole Foods' house brand). You can also invest in a dehydrator and make your own foods (or bake your own energy bars).

Trader Joes has Gluten Free beef jerkey (the organic beef in green pack). Very yummy and a lot cheaper than whole foods. I eat this before I work out. Also, dried fruit is a good option for energy and trail mix.


2010- Gluten, Soy, Corn, Dairy, Eggs, Nut free. Sugar, non-gluten grains lite(Yes, still plenty to eat!)

2010-Doctor diagnosed me as Celiac then took diagnoses back, then said avoid gluten for life

2009

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Apple slices with almond butter is a great snack for bike rides like this. Spread a light coating on the side of each slice and leave room so that you can pick up the apple without getting the almond butter on your fingers. Sugar and fiber for fuel, protein for recovery, high in good fats, simple to make, and delicious.


Your friendly support guy

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