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Swimmr

Pancake Mix...failed, Twice.

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I know sometimes its easier using the separate flours for a good blend, but find it way easier to buy it already mixed. And when it's labeled, "Perfect Flour Blend" you expect to use it as a sub for any gluten free flour blend that a recipe calls for.

I buy Namaste's perfect flour blend. I've used it for a modified red velvet cake - which ended up coming out perfectly and the recipe called for separate flours and perhaps I just got real lucky with adding up the amount of dry flours and using the exact amount of the blend minus the xanthan gum because the blend has that in it already. This was the only successful baked good that has come out of using this blend though. I made their printed recipe for banana bread and pumpkin loaf and BOTH were gummy and wet on the inside and too cooked on the top. I've tried both three times.

However, when it comes to pancake mixes, I've used Pamela's, which is really really good, but so dang expensive. I found a recipe for gluten free pancakes this morning and used my perfect flour blend in place of the "gluten free flour blend" that the recipe called for. It was not separate flours. I thought it would be fail-safe. No. It turned into a thick gummy dough. I added so much liquid that they were wet on the inside even after cooking in the pan. Nasty nasty nasty. DH is a human garbage disposal and literally will eat anything, so he ate them anyways. I decided I would try again substituting water for milk thinking that maybe the milk is causing the gummy thickness. No. Same thing. I was so angry I cried. I really really wanted pancakes. I don't want to have to buy a gazillion flours to make a comparable pancake and don't want to spend 20 bucks on a bag of mix (Pamela's because my local store doesn't carry smaller bags). If a flour blend is a flour blend, it should work universally and not just for the recipes printed on their own stupid label. I don't really like bob's red mill either. I can't find a basic universal blend of flour that tastes great for pancakes and other baked items like cakes and cookies. Is there a universal blend that is good for everything?

This morning I really truly despised being a Celiac :( I didn't even eat breakfast - I wanted to torch my kitchen instead. Watching it burn would have made me feel better. I was more angry over the waste of money I think.


-Self-diagnosed gluten/wheat intolerance 2007. Negative (basic) blood test for celiac disease March 2009.

-Diagnosed positive for Celiac 5/11/2010!!

-Vitamin D low (last year was deficient), Iodine low, Protein S low. Balance/dizziness not related to Celiac.

-Elimination diet 11-4-2009 and ended 02-28-2010. Tolerating dairy again. Highly intolerant to soy, sensitive to green peas and corn kernels.

"Oh CRAP! Are you SERIOUS??

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


There is some good info on this thread-


Started on this journey w/ my 9 yr old son after a bout w/ the flu in the fall of 2009.

2 neg celiac blood tests, mine was also neg. No endo done. Son had x-ray, showing severe constipation. Son has latex allergy. KP for both of us.

Long family history of bowel problems, auto-immune and all sorts of cancers. My G-mother informed me that she was put on a gluten free diet after she had my mom (1950's), of course she stopped when she felt better. She has had problems ever since I can remember.

So here we are! I do have my son's Dr to thank for even bringing up celiac! Thank You Dr.B!

My adult daughter also has been helped by eating gluten-free.

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I found that I had the same problem. I switched to a buckwheat/brown rice flour pancake. Here is the link to the recipe: http://www.ehow.com/how_4703831_gluten-buckwheat-pancakes.html

I have never added xanthan or quar gum. However lately, the family wants a different taste. I plan on trying the Betty Crocker recipe for the gluten free Bisquik. I have made the waffles and we all love them so the pancakes are next to try.


Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.

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I always use Pamela s flours for pancakes... It does get expensive, but I buy mine in bulk from (Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned) I usually buy 6 small bags for 23.00 I open one and keep the rest in the freezer.


Wheat free March 2008

Gluten free December 2010

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I always use Pamela s flours for pancakes... It does get expensive, but I buy mine in bulk from (Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned) I usually buy 6 small bags for 23.00 I open one and keep the rest in the freezer.

Pamela's is $6.29 for a 24 oz. bag at Giant so I did the subscribe-and-save at "the company that spammed the forum" and six bags were $25.89 in Oct., which brought it down to $4.31 a bag with free shipping. Surprisingly I've never made pancakes from it but use it for quick breads, muffins, etc. It's probably my favorite product.

I like gluten-free Bisquick for pancakes and they always turn out well.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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I like gluten-free Bisquick for pancakes and they always turn out well.

Do you do anything different from what the recipe calls for?? My Bisquick pancake tasted like a fluffy potato <_< And my Bob's Red Mill pancake tasted like a gummy bean-flavored bread. (I used the all-purpose flour.)

I can do without breads and stuff, but I really like my pancakes. If I can perfect just one recipe, I'd be ecstatic.

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I've had great results using just rice flour for pancakes. I've done this recipe: http://www.food.com/recipe/rice-flour-pancakes-304233

And last week when my DH wanted banana pancakes I did a search and found this: http://www.grouprecipes.com/25531/gluten-free-banana-pancakes.html

I liked the banana pancakes even better than the plain ones. I used almond milk in both recipes and for the banana ones I used my blender so there were not big chunks of banana. The plain ones turned out thin and the banana ones turned out thick, but both cooked through and were devoured by my non-gluten free hubby.


A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

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Do you do anything different from what the recipe calls for?? My Bisquick pancake tasted like a fluffy potato dry.gif And my Bob's Red Mill pancake tasted like a gummy bean-flavored bread. (I used the all-purpose flour.)

I can do without breads and stuff, but I really like my pancakes. If I can perfect just one recipe, I'd be ecstatic.

I may have added a bit more milk as the batter really thickens up but other than that, I make it according to package directions. I didn't notice a potato taste.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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I use the Nemaste Perfect Flour blend to make pumpkin rolls, and they are great.

For Pancakes, I use Gluten-Free Bisquick, but instead of regular milk, I use evaporated milk as a substitute. Sometimes I have to add a little water as well, because before you can cook the last pancake, the batter really thickens up. I've also used the Bisquick to make the biscuits and they were also great, just didn't like the idea of shortening (partial fat free diet), so next time, I'll use butter. I've also used bisquick to make the coconut pie, sloppy joe pie and several other dishes that were found on liveglutenfreely site, which is a website by Betty Crocker.

Wenmin

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Have you tried cutting the mix with rice flour or starch? It sounds like there is too much gum. Just be sure to increase the baking powder and sugar, maybe.

I like 123 Gluten Free's buckwheat pancakes, but mostly just mix rice flour with one flavored flour like corn or buckwheat and a dash of ground flaxseed to sub in a standard recipe.


2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable

3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG

4/2010 Negative biopsy

5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)

5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?

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There is no such thing as a universal gluten free all purpose flour mix that works in every recipe. This is because you are combining flours with different weights and physical properties such as proteins and starches. One cup of rice flour does NOT equal one cup of wheat flour by weight even if the volume is the same. You should go to the Shauna's blog Gluten Free Girl, and she can explain this better. She does her recipes that she invents, by the weight of the flour blends and uses a kitchen scale. But she is aiming for the professional cook or the wonky amateur who wants to duplicate the results exactly.

Some of the commercial mixes, such as Pamela's, are a little closer than others in having the ability to work in more than one or two recipes. Others are obviously taylored to just work in a few and that is why the results are so iffy. What works for cake or cookies might not be as suitable for bread. Even my husband can take the Pamela's bag and EffDee (Follow the Directions) and make suitable pancakes.

One of the things you can do is to get a cookbook of gluten free baking, and most will have a basic gluten free blend or several that they dedicate to working in most of the recipes in that book. Bette Hagman's is very good.

I make pancakes by using a small pre heated cast iron skillet, cooking the bottom in hot oil until it is browned and smells a certain way, and then finishing it off under the broiler, and then cutting the results into 4 wedges. They always come out and I don't have to worry about flipping them. I have a blender dedicated to grinding almonds and I start by throwing the nuts into the blender and a minute later I have the nut meal, I put it in a measuring cup and add the dry ingredients (it may or it may not have any other gluten-free high protein flours) and then in another bowl I have put some oil, cider vinegar, honey,agave, or molasses, and I crack an egg into it, mix it up, add the dry ingredients to the wet with a bit of extra water to make a batter, and it goes into the pan heating on the stove. Once you get your basic recipe down you can do this quickly by rote. I can also do a bun - a- bowl microwave bread fairly quickly this way, which takes about 1 min 30 sec to 2 minutes to cook, and there is a small, hot quick bread to go with breakfast or lunch. All this needs is a bit of practice and then go and post the recipe on a card on the inside of your kitchen cupboard with the proportions - I can do a small regular loaf of gluten free bread without measuring really strictly, but this is after years of practicing with the same ingredients and I never consider it "done" until I test it with a clean table knife - how to avoid gummy breads - cook it until it is done, but you may have to drop the oven temperature for certain grains, seeds, or nuts, and you may have to flip a loaf out of the pan, and finish it upside down for a few more minutes.

Some gluten free flours are sticky enough in combination that they don't even need added xanthan gum for pancakes or pan breads, such as combinations of almond meal and amaranth with some sorghum. Amaranth also seems to have some mold retardant properties and it stores well in the refrigerator when baked.

________________

There is also a "Clone" recipe for Pamela's mix which is supposed to be less expensive.

"Clonella's" Gluten Free Pancake Mix

1

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I absoutely love gluten-free Bisquick for pancakes. I really think they taste just like regular Bisquick pancakes. I use whole milk and I've topped them with applesauce, yogurt or syrup and really just can't say enough about that mix. I tried it for their Impossible Cheesburger Pie and the whole family loved it.

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I've only used the gluten-free Bisquick for pancakes so I can't help, sorry. But -- with the confession that I am NOT a cook -- I will mention that there are frozen gluten-free pancakes. I found them at Whole Foods or Trader Joe's (can't remember which now, sorry), near the waffles, and I like them. :rolleyes:

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