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melikamaui

Genetics - Can It Skip A Generation?

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So far my youngest son is the only person in our family to test positive for Celiac Disease. He, so far, is the only one to carry the genes. I had a test a year ago that came back negative, and am currently awaiting results of a new genetic test for myself as well as my oldest son. So my question is - If my husband and I are both negative for the celiac genes, how can my son have celiac disease? Could it have skipped a generation? (My parents and in-laws refuse to get tested.)

And furthermore, how common are false genetic negatives? I have found a myriad of symptoms that have cleared up for me as the result of going gluten free. If my son is a confirmed celiac, and I am finding that I am a new (healthy!) woman now that I'm gluten-free, how can I be negative genetically?

We've been at this for a year and I still feel like I have to go to medical school to figure all of this out!

Thanks,

Melika

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That is a question I would like to see answered as well. There doesn't seem to be any Celiac in my parents that I know of.

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About 30% of the population in the US has the genes commonly associated with Celiac. Just because you have the gene, it doesn't mean it is "activated" to cause Celiac. Everyone in your family for the last 20 generations could have the gene but not all or even any might have active Celiac.

If you have the gene, you got it from one parent. If you have a double of the same gene, you got it from both parents. Each parent gives you half of your genes. You have 2 genes for everything - one from each parent.

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About 30% of the population in the US has the genes commonly associated with Celiac. Just because you have the gene, it doesn't mean it is "activated" to cause Celiac. Everyone in your family for the last 20 generations could have the gene but not all or even any might have active Celiac.

If you have the gene, you got it from one parent. If you have a double of the same gene, you got it from both parents. Each parent gives you half of your genes. You have 2 genes for everything - one from each parent.

I think I get it now. Kareng, would you mind looking at my son's genetic test results posted in the Pre-Diagnosis forum? Can you tell from looking at it if he has more than one gene?

Thanks so much,

Melika

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I think I get it now. Kareng, would you mind looking at my son's genetic test results posted in the Pre-Diagnosis forum? Can you tell from looking at it if he has more than one gene?

Thanks so much,

Melika

I'm no expert on which genes mean what. He had to get these genes from his biological mom or dad. He did have a blood antibody test? I don't remember if you said.

This is from the Celiac Center in Chicago. There is research going on that may change this slightly but they tend to take the conservative approach.

http://www.celiacdisease.net/assets/pdf/CDCFactSheetsGeneticScreening4.pdf

How is the genetic predisposition for celiac disease inherited? Inheriting the genes for celiac disease occurs differently than the manner in which many genetic traits are passed on. We are accustomed to thinking in terms of dominant or recessive genes which are inherited from both parents and form sets to determine hair color, height, and other human health characteristics. In fact,

even though DQ2 and DQ8 are passed on similarly, they are not sufficient to determine the occurrence of the disease, even if they are present in double doses. Because 35% of the American population have either DQ2 (more commonly) or DQ8, it is possible for two affected people to marry each other. The genes can be passed on by males as well as females. Therefore, one person's gene test doesn't necessarily mean that the other side of the family is not affected as well.

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I'm no expert on which genes mean what. He had to get these genes from his biological mom or dad. He did have a blood antibody test? I don't remember if you said.

This is from the Celiac Center in Chicago. There is research going on that may change this slightly but they tend to take the conservative approach.

http://www.celiacdisease.net/assets/pdf/CDCFactSheetsGeneticScreening4.pdf

How is the genetic predisposition for celiac disease inherited? Inheriting the genes for celiac disease occurs differently than the manner in which many genetic traits are passed on. We are accustomed to thinking in terms of dominant or recessive genes which are inherited from both parents and form sets to determine hair color, height, and other human health characteristics. In fact,

even though DQ2 and DQ8 are passed on similarly, they are not sufficient to determine the occurrence of the disease, even if they are present in double doses. Because 35% of the American population have either DQ2 (more commonly) or DQ8, it is possible for two affected people to marry each other. The genes can be passed on by males as well as females. Therefore, one person's gene test doesn't necessarily mean that the other side of the family is not affected as well.

Are the blood antibody tests the tests that you need to be on the gluten challenge for? If so, no. We can't do a challenge with him, he is crazy sensitive. He got cc'd awhile ago (still haven't figured out how) and he was really sick for 8 days. He lost 2 pounds from diarrhea and vomiting. Our doctor agreed that a gluten challenge isn't necessary with him. They ran his serology but it all came back fine because he's been gluten-free for over a year.

I'll check out that link. Thanks!

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