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singingfrizzle

Migranes After Starting Gluten-Free

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My 17 year old daughter has had years of stomach problems. After many years of testing, scoping, lab work, etc. etc., someone suggested she TRY eating Gluten free & sugar free. She started off with sugar free & the nauseau left, but the pain was still there. Once she went gluten-free, the pain left as well. (She WAS tested for Celiac along the years, but it came back negative. But that was several years ago.) But NOW she has started having pretty severe migranes. (Which she never had before starting this.) Any suggestions or help?

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Migraines are one of the first signs I've been glutened. Is she getting them after she accidentally eats some gluten? Early in the diet, reactions can vary and even get worse (and the symptoms can change) so that may be what's happening.

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Sensitivity to gluten can increase when you go gluten free. Therefore, if there is any cross contamination or trace gluten...she may have more extreme symptoms. And migraine headaches are very commonly associated with glutenings. It is possible her reactions will be more severe to itty bitty dust particles of gluten. We cannot tolerate even trace amounts as they cause the antibodies to react. The testing is not very reliable....her reactions are very reliable. Sorry she is feeling badly...look into all possible sources of contamination. Good luck.

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I never had migraines before in my life until I went gluten free. I experienced them after my second or third week as part of my withdrawal process. They went away for the most part shortly after that. Perhaps she's going through the same thing?

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I just started a gluten-free diet on 8-18-11 (yesterday) and I have a severe headache today.

I don't know if it's a lack of sleep or withdrawals from gluten.

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I got the headache issue as well. For me, it turned out to be undiagnosed food allergies - I don't get hives, I get things like headaches. Weird stuff, but can also happen to a number of celiacs.

I'd suggest keeping a food journal if you aren't already. Keep track of what's eaten, at what time, and when the symptoms are happening, and see if a connection pops up. For the foods, you want to record every ingredient, too, as the connection can sometimes be a very small ingredient among many, especially if it turns out to be gluten cc rather than an allergy or intolerance.

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I went gluten-free 6 weeks ago and had TERRIBLE migraine type headaches. Still get them off and on but they were BAD right away thought. Gluten has an opiate-like effect, and the withdrawals are uncomfortable. It's temporary, though! I really felt great when the worst of it passed.

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about a month after going gluten free I had horrible HORRIBLE headaches and they lasted for a very long time. I was tested for everything but none of the Drs I saw could find a reason why. A few people suggested something called gluten withdrawal. Months later I was dx with hashimoto's (autoimmune hypothyroidism) and after finding the right treatment for that my headaches went away. I believe that the headaches were my body's reaction to stopping one autoimmune attack and jumping to another. There are many reasons your daughter could be having headaches after going gluten free. It could even have something to do with her menstrual cycle regulating now that her gut is healing.

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I got the headache issue as well. For me, it turned out to be undiagnosed food allergies - I don't get hives, I get things like headaches. Weird stuff, but can also happen to a number of celiacs.

I'd suggest keeping a food journal if you aren't already. Keep track of what's eaten, at what time, and when the symptoms are happening, and see if a connection pops up. For the foods, you want to record every ingredient, too, as the connection can sometimes be a very small ingredient among many, especially if it turns out to be gluten cc rather than an allergy or intolerance.

Thanks for the reply.

Gluten cc? New to this.

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Thanks for the reply.

Gluten cc? New to this.

Gluten CC just means gluten cross contamination. For example: you make a sandwich with regular bread, don't wash your hands after, talk on the phone/pick up tv remote etc., daughter comes along and uses said phone or tv remote, she does not wash her hands and then makes a gluten free sandwich and eats it. This is cross contamination. The gluten residue was on the phone and tranfered to her and onto her sandwich and then ate it getting in her stomach.

It is recommended not to share a toaster that had regular bread in it. You can always buy another cheeper one and keep it strictly for gluten free. Wooden cutting boards/wooden spoons need replaced. Strainers that were used for regular pasta should be replaced or purchase a new one just for gluten free pasta. Condiments, spices, sugar etc. that may have potential for wheat/gluten contamination ie using same measure spoon/cup in regular flour then using it for other things without washing or dipping into the peanut butter or what ever then spreading it on bread and putting the knife back into the jar, need replaced or buy her separate. It is recommended that any teflon or non stick pans that the coating is scratched be replaced. I chose to replace all my bakeware except my glass or pyrex.

I guess you need to decide if you are going to have a shared kitchen or a gluten free kitchen. When I was first diagnosed I did all of the above things and took my kitchen mostly gluten free. My husband and kids had a separate part of the counter that they could prepare there gluten food if need be. I eliminated any baking with regular flour and strictly went gluten free for that. If they wanted something with gluten or something I couldn't make, they could buy it at the bakery. I didn't want the flour dust particles in the air to breath or settling back down onto the counter. All our meals together were made gluten free with the exception of pasta. Any left over condiments I marked with an X and let everyone else finish them up and then bought more in squeeze bottles if possible and then we shared. We share cheese and lunchmeat. Hubby washes his hands then takes out what he needs/wants then puts it away and then makes his sandwich. He scoops out jelly/peanut butter with a spoon then spreads it on his bread. I dedicated the top shelf and one crisper drawer in the fridge for their gluten food only, the rest being gluten free. I'm glad I took these initial steps because last Nov. my youngest son was diagnosed with celiac also. It has helped him feel more comfortable and confident to help himself in the kitchen. I didn't want him stressing. I also went through the house and wiped down anything I thought might have gluten residue on it. Think of it as germs and your need to wipe them away. Hope this helps and I'm sure I've left something out, but others will chime in.

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Thanks so much for the info. CC totally makes scense now.

I am sort of a germophobe so this part shouldn't be too hard.

I think the next step for me is to hire a dietician in order to learn HOW to eat all over again.

I'm sure that's the hardest part.

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