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MikeTambo

Gluten Withdrawl

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I was recently diagnosed and have been off gluten for about 2 weeks. My appetite seems to have gotten worse and my ability to digest anything seems to take forever! I've lost a few pounds, something I'm not happy about as my "fighting weight" is about 10 lbs north of where I am now.

I've heard about gluten withdrawal and how this new eating style can otherwise throw your digestive system out of whack for a few weeks into months. Any comments? Does this seem normal?

Mike

UPDATE - appetite gotten WORSE means I'm not nearly as hungry as I should be, not eating as much and everything seems to take forever to burp up, even water!

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Yes thats normal. No gluten means super hungry. I eat a lot of fruit. Bananas or apples.For carbs if lactose isn't a problem eat some cheese. Avocados are high in fat too! It doesn't sound like your having gluten withdrawals yet, but it does sound like your body is detoxing. Good luck! B)

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In what way is your appetite worse? Do you mean more hunger or less?

If you're eating gluten-free breads and pasta, you might find it helpful to put those aside for awhile, and focus on whole, unprocessed foods. Fresh veggies, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds, grains, etc should provide the best nutrient value. In addition, a good quality digestive enzyme might help the digestive system do its job.

When I first went gluten-free, I also couldn't digest foods very well. This seemed to contribute to a truly ravenous and insatiable appetite. I could not eat enough. What I found to be helpful, even necessary, was to make a puree out of everything using a blender. It took over a year for my digestive system to improve enough so that I didn't have to do that anymore. While it certainly made meals kinda boring, there was the obvious benefit. My weight did drop during that time as well.

I don't know how common these things are, but they do occur for some of us.

I also found various nutritional supplements to be very helpful, and still do. It seems not everyone has a quick and miraculous recovery. I hope yours is quicker and more complete than mine!

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In what way is your appetite worse? Do you mean more hunger or less?

If you're eating gluten-free breads and pasta, you might find it helpful to put those aside for awhile, and focus on whole, unprocessed foods. Fresh veggies, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds, grains, etc should provide the best nutrient value. In addition, a good quality digestive enzyme might help the digestive system do its job.

When I first went gluten-free, I also couldn't digest foods very well. This seemed to contribute to a truly ravenous and insatiable appetite. I could not eat enough. What I found to be helpful, even necessary, was to make a puree out of everything using a blender. It took over a year for my digestive system to improve enough so that I didn't have to do that anymore. While it certainly made meals kinda boring, there was the obvious benefit. My weight did drop during that time as well.

I don't know how common these things are, but they do occur for some of us.

I also found various nutritional supplements to be very helpful, and still do. It seems not everyone has a quick and miraculous recovery. I hope yours is quicker and more complete than mine!

Thanks! Appetite gotten WORSE means I'm not nearly as hungry as I should be, not eating as much and everything seems to take forever to burp up, even water!

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Well, the first 6 months are a roller coaster.

Some people find other food intolerances - temporary or permanent.

Probiotics and digestive enzymes can help break down food and repopulate your system. Some people have low stomach acid and take an enzyme to help with it (search low stomach acid here).

Sometimes you just have to revamp your diet and eat what works - its constant change.

Good luck!

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I'm not sure what you mean by 'burp up', but that may fall under TMI, also. :huh: However, I've read a few blog entries for the book 'Wheat Belly', and apparently eating wheat will cause a large increase in one's blood sugar. Higher than a candy bar, even. I think that would account for your not being as hungry. Here's the most recent blog entry that talks about hunger pangs, in fact.

I haven't read the book yet, I have it on my Amazon wish list.

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I'm not sure what you mean by 'burp up', but that may fall under TMI, also. :huh:

:lol: then you may wish to steer clear of topics about bowel movements and C and D on here. :lol: :lol:

We sometimes "tell all"--in gory details-- in attempts to figure out people's issues.

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I was recently diagnosed and have been off gluten for about 2 weeks. My appetite seems to have gotten worse and my ability to digest anything seems to take forever! I've lost a few pounds, something I'm not happy about as my "fighting weight" is about 10 lbs north of where I am now.

I've heard about gluten withdrawal and how this new eating style can otherwise throw your digestive system out of whack for a few weeks into months. Any comments? Does this seem normal?

Mike

UPDATE - appetite gotten WORSE means I'm not nearly as hungry as I should be, not eating as much and everything seems to take forever to burp up, even water!

Hi Mike,

The first few months are unique to everyone, but I can assure you that what's happening is probably quite "normal" for YOU.

Yes, gluten withdrawal does occur (it does not last very long)and yes, you will have dyspepsia, changes in your bowel patterns (sorry to be frank, but this is the human body we're dealing with), even your sleep patterns may change ---and you may feel downright rotten at times. It's all temporary as your body readjusts. It's an up- and -down healing path.

As PRICKLYPEAR wisely points out, many of us used digestive enzymes to help with digestion.

And I second her suggestion and recommend probiotics to balance your gut flora. Celiacs need them. And drink a lot of water. You're probably dehydrated--as most of us were, too. Please read this:

http://www.thefooddoc.com/probiotic_facts

Dairy may cause you some issues. It is suggested by celiac-savvy doctors that you avoid it the first few months. But that is up to you. Why do it? Well, Lactase, which is the enzyme that breaks down the sugar lactose, is produced in the tip of the villi. When the villi get blunted in celiac disease, sometimes the ability to digest lactose is decreased and you can become lactose intolerant. This may cause bloating, stomach cramps, diarrhea, etc. After you go gluten-free, the villi will heal and most people are able to tolerate dairy foods again.

It takes time for your gut lining to heal. In time, you will put on some weight. Don't worry about that right now. Just focus on being gluten-free and feeling better! (I lost 90+ lbs. to this disease --granted, I was overweight to start with--and I became pretty emaciated, but I have gained 14 since my DX and healing my gut.

It's all about the absorption--you'll get it back.

Hang in there!

Best wishes!

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Thank goodness someone else shared this. I'm sorry to hear you're feeling as crappy as I am but misery loves company. I've been rewarding myself getting through my first few gluten-free days by drinking Synergy

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