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Malisa1

Accidental Discovery

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My mother had severe digestive problems as well as other issues. She died 6 years ago from an abdominal anurysm. About 6 months ago, a lightbulb went off and I began to think she had celiac disease. Besides cramping and diarrhea, she was fatigued (even as a child), late bloomer, thin, fine hair, short stature, diverticulitis, low cholesterol, chronic hives, etc. Anyway, it fits like a glove. While researching Celiac Disease to satisfy my curiosity about her, I realized that going back through my life, I have been able to apply 40 of the 300 symptoms to myself. I started a gluten free diet three weeks ago and my chronic hives have gone away, except after I cheated at McDonald's and with banana bread. Could there be something to this or am I being a hypochondriac? I've had hives for over 30 years.

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There could be something to this. If you want to do a really good test of the gluten-free diet then be very strict about it & stay on it for 6 months. But I will warn you that if you try to go back on gluten even now (after 3 weeks gluten-free) for testing; you are likely to have worse symptoms than before. This is the norm for almost all celiacs who go off gluten & then try to go back on for a challenge or for testing.

If you don't care about an official dx then you're already on your way!

And welcome to the board! smile.gif If you need help --- just post.

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My mother had severe digestive problems as well as other issues. She died 6 years ago from an abdominal anurysm. About 6 months ago, a lightbulb went off and I began to think she had celiac disease. Besides cramping and diarrhea, she was fatigued (even as a child), late bloomer, thin, fine hair, short stature, diverticulitis, low cholesterol, chronic hives, etc. Anyway, it fits like a glove. While researching Celiac Disease to satisfy my curiosity about her, I realized that going back through my life, I have been able to apply 40 of the 300 symptoms to myself. I started a gluten free diet three weeks ago and my chronic hives have gone away, except after I cheated at McDonald's and with banana bread. Could there be something to this or am I being a hypochondriac? I've had hives for over 30 years.

Sometimes hypochondriac is what society labels us, crazy people who believe that a "healthy" person should be healthy. You should always listen to your body is what i have learned and not ignore it when it is clearly telling you something. I would definitely continue my suspicions if i were you and follow up with a doctor.

See what everybody else says though :)

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Personally, I think you should immediately start eating gluten again and get complete testing done. If you do have celiac disease, it is important for other family members to be tested. Also, if it is celiac, cheating is not an option, ever.

It is easy to justify cheating "a little bit" if you aren't even sure you have it.

Also, if it is celiac, you are at increased risk for other autoimmune disorders.

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I appreciate all of your replies. As far as the not cheating, I am doing very well at home, trying to see it as an adventure and not a curse. It is the food outside at restaurants that will take more discipline. Again, thanks.

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I, too, would recommend that you continue with gluten. But that's always a personal choice. I have included the tests for a RX from your Primary Care Physician:

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG

Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA

Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA

Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG

Total Serum IgA

It's highly likely, you have a genetic pre disposition. Your children or your siblings, might like to have confirmation.

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