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Having Trouble In Starting Gluten Free

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First off, I'm sure I have a food allergy of some kind, even though I've had an allergy test and nothing came positive.

I've had seborrhoeic dermatitis for 10 yrs now, but at times I randomly get bloated, gassy and sharp abdominal pains but I thought those symptoms could be stress as I have an anxiety disorder.

Anyway, this week has really hit me, and is the reason why I'm typing this out looking for answers.

I do get a lot of headaches, and migraines around a couple a month, a burning sensation around my mouth and the aforementioned symptoms above.

The thing is, I've had bread and milk (I believe that's the culprit judging this week and other days), but other times eating these foods I get no reaction?

I do find it very challenging to stay gluten free though. Not because of cravings, but I just don't fill up. Wen I'm out, I usually get sushi ( try to get brown), and just eat a lot of fruits, nuts, rice cakes, eggs, gluten-free cereal. I just find it hard to make good full meals.

Any advice for someone trying to start a gluten free diet?

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Complying with a gluten free diet can be challenging at first.  A lot of people find the difficulty lies in not having a definate diagnosis.  Once you do commit to the change in eating for life it gets much easier.  If you are having trouble feeling full, you may want to eat many smaller meals.  Rice and potatoes are very filling.  Snacking throughout the day on nuts, fruits and vegies will help.  

 

Also, seborrheic dermatitis or eczema is linked to celiac disease.  Here is some information on it.

 

http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/glutenintolerance/ss/Nine-Signs-You-May-Have-A-Gluten-Allergy_3.htm.

 

Good luck to you. 

 

Colleen 

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My doctor tells me to make sure to have just under a tablespoon of good fat with every meal.  Good fats include butter,(if tolerated) olive oil, or coconut oil.  Fats help you feel full and keep that full feeling until time for the next meal.  She also says to have 2-3 ounces of protein along with some (27)carbs.  She allows more than that, but you keep it in the same proportions.  Don't forget a cup or so of vegetables.

 

Hard to tell why you would seem to react one time and not the other.  According to my functional medicine nurse, one can have reactions up to 4 days after eating  I can tell you that when I ate gluten constantly, my body became too overwhelmed to react.  (This in retrospect and as a guess)  I dealt with constant fog and fatigue.  Not to mention the bloating so much that people asked if I were pregnant.  As I became better, I noticed that I had responses to what I ate. 

 

I did antibody testing to help me discover my food intolerances.  I also did a rotational diet.  I only eat various food groups every 4 days.  This helped me to realize or suspect some foods that caused more and more noticeable reactions as I healed.  You may want to add some new foods to your diet.  I ate more fish and tried some novelty meats.  I tried lamb, alpaca, bison, duck, and yak.  The new foods you try you are less likely to have antibodies to.  Some vegetables you might try include turnips, swiss chard, and fennel bulb.  I tried papaya and mango.  These two fruits are not common where I live in Minnesota.

 

Have you done a nutrient test to see whether you are absorbing nutrients well?  Are you doing a digestive enzyme supplement?  Do you take a gluten free vitamin?  All of these things helped me and many on the forum.

 

You may want to try these ideas over time if you need them.  It is possible that eliminating gluten will  get to the root of the problem and you will heal without more trouble.  Things can get a little complicated; I generally avoid doctors, I had help from several to deal with celiac disease.

 

D

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Starting Gluten free is easy. No pre packaged foods.. Buy meat and fresh veggies. 

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the kefir (it's like yogurt you drink) i buy is 99% lactose free and gluten free - i am like you, hungry all the time, i could eat every 2 hours.  kefir has lots of protien and will tide me over if i am feeling famished, eat, drink some kefir, good to go :)  also, almonds or almond butter will keep me satisfied for a longer amount of time, but even a pb&j sandwich is pretty good, too. 

 

if you are planning on getting tested for celiac, they will want you to be eating gluten.

 

good luck :)

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Complying with a gluten free diet can be challenging at first.  A lot of people find the difficulty lies in not having a definate diagnosis.  Once you do commit to the change in eating for life it gets much easier.  If you are having trouble feeling full, you may want to eat many smaller meals.  Rice and potatoes are very filling.  Snacking throughout the day on nuts, fruits and vegies will help.  

 

Also, seborrheic dermatitis or eczema is linked to celiac disease.  Here is some information on it.

 

http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/glutenintolerance/ss/Nine-Signs-You-May-Have-A-Gluten-Allergy_3.htm.

 

Good luck to you. 

 

Colleen 

"interactable dandruff"  - lolz, colleen, one of them five dolla words :D

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HI,

 

Here are a couple threads with info you should read.  Test tomorrow.  Not!! :)

 

Celiac disease is a possibility, and so is NCGI.  Neither one is a food allergy, so food allergy testing will not reveal them. 

 

Your symptoms do make sense for possible celiac disease.  Celiac symptoms can vary widely, as our bodies don't all react like little robots.  Sometimes people have no symptoms at all but have a lot of damage to their guts.  That is called silent celiac.  People with NCGI have celiac like symptoms but a different immune response than celiacs do.

 

There is a  series of blood antibodie tests that the doctor can do for celiac, but there is no test for NCGI yet, except positive response to the gluten-free diet..

 

Helpful threads:

FAQ Celiac com
https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101
https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

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"interactable dandruff"  - lolz, colleen, one of them five dolla words :D

 

You just gotta love this stuff! :)

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When I was going through gluten withdrawal (it is a very real, physical withdrawal), I was hungry all the time. I could eat a huge chicken breast, and very large sweet potato, a large serving of broccoli, and even though my stomach was full, I was still hungry. Just eat lots of small meals throughout the day. Eat someting every hour if need be. The withdrawal phase only lasts a couple or three weeks. Expect headaches and mood swings with withdrawal too. It's worth a couple of weeks of that in order to start feeling better.

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Thank you all for the replies, much appreciated. :) I've yet to have a nutritional test done, and never have taken any supplements of any sort. Guess that's another thing I could look into.

I'll have a good look at those links and go from there.

Another thing I wanted to ask is should I also cut out dairy or see if the symptoms stop by only excluding gluten in my diet? I guess it'll make it easier to narrow it down instead of avoiding both allergens.

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Thank you all for the replies, much appreciated. :) I've yet to have a nutritional test done, and never have taken any supplements of any sort. Guess that's another thing I could look into.

I'll have a good look at those links and go from there.

Another thing I wanted to ask is should I also cut out dairy or see if the symptoms stop by only excluding gluten in my diet? I guess it'll make it easier to narrow it down instead of avoiding both allergens.

I believe you were saying that dairy is causing some issues.  I would try removing it for 3-6 months and test it after that.  I use coconut milk or nut milk as substitutes.

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