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Hi,

 

I was recently tested for celiac markers and here are my results:

 

TISSUE TRANSGLUTAMINASE IgG <=0.90 Index 0.13 Tissue transglutaminase IgA <=0.90 Index 1.17

 

Would this mean I have celiacs?    Also, I have broke out in hives all over my body and they burn.  They don't itch, they just burn and they have said it's Urticaria and it's autoimmune related even though all my auto immune tests came back negative, except this IgA test.

 

Please help.

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The positive tTG igA test is specific to celiac disease about 95% of the time - unfortunately you probably have celiac disease. Most celiacs (around here) do not test positive on every celiac test they have run.  If you have more tests run, like the DGP IgA, DGP IgG, and EMA IgA, or the endoscopic biopsy, you might end up with more positive tests that support that diagnosis. If you do choose to do more testing, do not go gluten-free until after the testing is done. 

 

I haven't had dermatitis herpetiformis, or any other skin related problems with celiac disease so I can't comment on that. I'm sure others will chime in and offer you advice.

 

Best wishes. I hope you feel better soon.

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Hi,

 

I have had a rash now for 6 weeks and it burns (sun burn sensation).     I also tested a low positive for wheat allergy and my Tissue Transglusamine IgA was elevated at 1.17 with <.9 being the normal range.     The allergist gave me a shot of Xolair for my hives (not helping so far), and I still have a burning rash.   Now my skin is starting to get dry and sand paper feeling.   Last night, I went to the ER due to facial swelling and my white blood cell count was high at 23, 000.

 

Is this normal with celiacs or any other ideas you may have?  Any insight would be appreciated.  Thanks!

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The positive tTG igA test is specific to celiac disease about 95% of the time - unfortunately you probably have celiac disease. Most celiacs (around here) do not test positive on every celiac test they have run.  If you have more tests run, like the DGP IgA, DGP IgG, and EMA IgA, or the endoscopic biopsy, you might end up with more positive tests that support that diagnosis. If you do choose to do more testing, do not go gluten-free until after the testing is done. 

 

I haven't had dermatitis herpetiformis, or any other skin related problems with celiac disease so I can't comment on that. I'm sure others will chime in and offer you advice.

 

Best wishes. I hope you feel better soon.

Thanks!

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Hi,

 

I have had a rash now for 6 weeks and it burns (sun burn sensation).     I also tested a low positive for wheat allergy and my Tissue Transglusamine IgA was elevated at 1.17 with <.9 being the normal range.     The allergist gave me a shot of Xolair for my hives (not helping so far), and I still have a burning rash.   Now my skin is starting to get dry and sand paper feeling.   Last night, I went to the ER due to facial swelling and my white blood cell count was high at 23, 000.

 

Is this normal with celiacs or any other ideas you may have?  Any insight would be appreciated.  Thanks!

I merged this topic with the other because they are the same topic. FYI in case it looks a bit odd.

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The symptoms that you are describing are not considered "normal" for a celiac based on my readings.  That being said, they are not unheard of either.  Our family suffers from skin issues related to gluten exposure.  We are considered to have celiac and gluten allergy.  Often times I will refer to the allergy as wheat allergy, but that is only to simplify it for people.  Our skin reactions have included hives, as well as burning skin.  I don't think that we ever had burning hives.  There are many issues that can affect skin, so professional medical advice is prudent.  And, in our experience, it can be a long struggle to get skin issues back under control, and that required a lot of medical consultation for us.  At the end of our countless doctor visits, a couple of hospital visits and a lot of money . . . gluten eradication has been the solution.

 

One of my children suffered a horrific hiving period that resulted in a lot of medical intervention.  While gluten eradication was instrumental in her gaining and maintaining wellness, she was also identified as having h. pylori on that road to recovery.  We do not know what role that h. pylori played in her journey, but we treated it.  Unfortunately, successful treatment of h. pylori did not alleviate the gluten eradication steps that she must maintain.  In my readings during that time, I did come across some information to indicate h. pylori may be considered for chronic, idiopathic hiving symptoms.

 

I hope you find relief soon.  Zyrtec and cool, wet cloths are what we have found to help take the edge off the burning sensation.

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