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farukhcasy2

Twitching/fluttering in my guts, feels like a fetus is kicking...definitely not pregnant.!!

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Does anyone else experience this? Dr. Google says "spasms" but it doesn't feel like spasms or cramping and there's definitely no...output issues (solid, liquid, or gas, lol). I had a lapse in judgement last week and ate chili garlic sauce even though I know garlic and me are not BFFs. That resulted in an evening of painful bloating, then a few more days of bloating, then a few more days of feeling "sensitive" in my intestines where I was hyper-aware of every activity (visceral hypersensitivity?), and now my guts are all twitchy and it's really annoying. I can feel the sensation from the outside too if I put my hand on my stomach. WTF is this?!

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Ugh!  I still can not tolerate garlic and onions.  Makes for some pretty bland cooking.  Now my kid is the same way.  Not only do we get GI problems, but our faces breakout.  We both have Rosacea.  Thankfully, we can now consume dairy!  

Research Zonulin.  Celiacs have too many of them thus maybe causing “leaky gut”.  It s a real thing.  Here is an easy to read article published on NPR:

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/12/09/459061317/a-protein-in-the-gut-may-explain-why-some-cant-stomach-gluten


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Ugh!  I still can not tolerate garlic and onions.  Makes for some pretty bland cooking.  Now my kid is the same way.  Not only do we get GI problems, but our faces breakout.  We both have Rosacea.  Thankfully, we can now consume dairy!  

Research Zonulin.  Celiacs have too many of them thus maybe causing “leaky gut”.  It s a real thing.  

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Prior to diagnosis, I did not have the so-called typical symptoms, no diarrhea or constipation, but I did get that fluttery feeling. Not so much in the stomach, but definately lower in the abdomen.  I had a sonic vaginal test once and they found no female problems, but did note a lot of peristalsis in the intestine (the normal rippling motion of muscles in the digestive tract that moves things along).  This was the closest any doctor came to noticing any celiac symptoms, yet it was totally dismissed and took another 5 years until I went to a naturopath and he figured it out in 15 minutes of conversation.

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No, MisterSeth!!!!  You should NOT be able to feel your heartbeat in your abdomen!!!!!

Feeling your heartbeat in your abdomen is a sign of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (Triple A).  It is deadly!

My mum confided in me (sorry, mum) that my dad couldn't get it up anymore.  I urged her to get him to the doctor ASAP.  Any changes in a man's "performance ability" is a RED Flag for circulation problems. 

At the conclusion of my dad's examination, during which nothing much seemed amiss, the doctor absent-mindedly laid his hand on my dad's stomach while they chatted.  The doctor could feel my dad's heartbeat in his abdomen!!!  Rushed for Cat scans, my dad was found to have an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.  Dad was scheduled for immediate surgery. In a Triple A, the aorta swells up like a balloon becoming thin and fragile and can rupture causing immediate death by bleeding out inside the abdomen.  During the surgery, the Triple A did rupture in the surgeon's hands.  By the grace of G* d, my dad survived. 

The intestinal squishing, peristaltic movement, that farukhcasy2 is feeling may be due to SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth), thiamine and niacin deficiencies.  The body tries to encourage the irritating bacteria (or even problematic foods) to leave the body by increasing muscle contractions.  SIBO uses up the body's thiamine and niacin, in which case thiamine and niacin deficiencies can result.  (Celiac Disease causes malabsorption of these vitamins as well.) 

The lower brain controls body functions we don't have to think about like blood pressure, digestion, heart rate and many more.  When thiamine becomes low or deficient, the signals from the lower brain become irregular, over and under signalling sporadically.   

For the SIBO, a low Fodmap diet, the Fasano diet or, my favorite, the AutoImmune Paleo Protocol diet should be implemented.  The SIBO bacteria love carbohydrates.  These diets are low in carbohydrates and effectively starve off the SIBO bacteria, allowing for recolonisation by good bacteria already in the gut.  Stay away from nightshades (tomatoes,potatoes, eggplant and peppers including chili peppers) because they increase zonulin that causes leaky gut syndrome.

Thiamine and niacin (in the forms Niacinamide and tryptophan) should be replenished by supplementation.  Thiamine will help the brain's neurological functions.  Niacinamide and tryptophan will help heal the leaky gut and help regulate the body's GI tract.    Magnesium will also help calm the muscle contractions.   

I am not a doctor.  This is not professional medical advice.  

Do check with your doctor about SIBO, and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.  Many newly diagnosed Celiacs have vitamin and mineral deficiencies.  Checking for nutritional deficiencies is part of follow up care.  Be aware you can have normal blood levels of these vitamins but still be deficient because the body has to keep certain levels in the blood to supply the brain's functions, but the body's tissues are starving.  Thiamine and Niacinamide are water soluble B vitamins.  Any extra is excreted in urine.  There's no upper limit or toxicity to thiamine.  

Hope this helps!

Knitty Kitty

 

 

 

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Yes, you can feel your heartbeat in your abdomen if you are very thin.  Granted aneurysms are genetic and often made worse by smoking.    My Dad had one and it was thankfully repaired.  Because doctors could feel a strong pulse in my abdomen and I had a strong family history, I had an ultrasound.  No aneurysm was found.  Get checked if you have a family member who has an aneurysm — even if you do not have related issues like obesity, are a male or smoke.  

 


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Quoted from...

https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/9181/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm

"Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is thought to be a multifactorial condition, meaning that one or more genes likely interact with environmental factors to cause the condition. In some cases, it may occur as part of an inherited syndrome.[3]

Having a family history of AAA increases the risk of developing the condition. A genetic predisposition has been suspected since the first report of three brothers who had a ruptured AAA, and additional families with multiple affected relatives have been reported.[4] In some cases, it may be referred to as " familial abdominal aortic aneurysm."[3] A Swedish survey reported that the relative risk of developing AAA for a first-degree relative of a person with AAA was approximately double that of a person with no family history of AAA. In another study, having a family history increased the risk of having an aneurysm 4.3-fold. The highest risk was among brothers older than age 60, in whom the prevalence was 18%.[4]

While specific variations in DNA (polymorphisms) are known or suspected to increase the risk for AAA, no one gene is known to cause isolated AAA. It can occur with some inherited disorders that are caused by mutations in a single gene, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type. However, these more typically involve the thoracoabdominal aorta.[4]

Because the inheritance of AAA is complex, it is not possible to predict whether a specific person will develop AAA. People interested in learning more about the genetics of AAA, and how their family history affects risks to specific family members, should speak with a genetics professional."

It's not simply a matter of having a gene for triple A.  

"Multifactorial condition"...... "genes  with environmental factors"....

no one else in my dad's family had a history of abdominal aortic aneurysm.  

 

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yeah in my experience any part of the body that gets inflamed starts to pulse. and if you get carpel tunnel or any other kind of nerve damage it goes numb for a long time and then when it wakes up it feels like someone is pumping a squirt gun into it. villus atrophy is nerve damage right? numb bowels?

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Villus atrophy is not nerve damage.  

The villi in your intestines should normally be long finger like projections waving around in a sea of digestive juices absorbing nutrients from your food.  Picture anemones where Nemo and other clown fish live.

Gluten damages these villi.  Instead of long finger like projections, the villi become short and stunted.  Picture a long lush lawn mowed too short, down to where the dirt shows.  That's villus atrophy.  Stunted, unable to function, stubby damaged villi.  

Nerve damage happens to the nerves.  Nerves are like electric cords. Electric cords have an outer layer of plastic coating with the live wires on the inside.  You've got a charger cord for your cellphone or an electric cord that plugs in to the wall socket and allows the electricity to flow through and turns on a lamp, your phone or your tv.  

Nerve damage happens when the myelin sheath (analogous to that plastic coating on the outside of the wires) gets stripped away or worn too thin. The electric current can't easily get past these spots without the protective coating.  That's nerve damage.

The myelin sheath is made up of fats.  The nerves in your body needs those fats to protect them. Omega three fats like flaxseed oil and extra virgin olive oil and fatty fish like salmon and in liver.

Peripheral neuropathy is where the nerves in your toes and feet and fingertips don't work right or quit working.  Maybe the myelin sheath is damaged and the nerves are left exposed and the electric current comes out and you feel like your toes are buzzing or pulsing.    Maybe the nerve cells don't have enough energy to function properly and don't fire at all and you can't feel anything at all, are numb.

Nerves need certain vitamins to function.  Without these vitamins the nerves don't function properly.  Your nerves need vitamin B12, thiamine, and benfotiamine, niacin, B6 (pyridoxine) and those omega three fats.  

Carpal tunnel syndrome is from repetitive movement.  The muscles are told to move the same way over and over. The nerves telling those muscles to move get worn out from firing too often without enough down time for repair and without enough parts for repair.  Maybe they shut down altogether and you become numb.  When they start working again, maybe they feel like a pulsing.

Fun Fact:  The longest nerve cell in your body runs from your back all the way down to your big toe.  

Hope this helps.

Eat more Liver!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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