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Emme999

Bacterial Enzyme Renders Gluten Harmless

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Here's a little research I just found regarding an enzyme that supposedly can "neutralize" celiac disease. (I'll stick in the main parts and put the link at the end :))

In the September 27 issue of Science, Chaitan Khosla and his coworkers at Stanford University and the University of Norway in Oslo, report disassembling the large, complex mixture of gluten proteins and identifying a single component that triggers the autoimmune response characteristic of celiac sprue.

The researchers determined that the autoimmune response in people with celiac sprue can be traced to an unusually long molecule - a chain of 33 amino acids - that cannot be broken down by the human digestive system. They immersed the 33-amino acid chain in digestive enzymes derived from bacteria and found that a bacterial enzyme, prolyl endopeptidase, can break the chain into apparently harmless components.

In the small intestine, enzymes from the pancreas initially digest gluten by breaking it into a number of fragments called peptides. In most people, the larger peptides probably work their way down to the lower intestine where they are eaten by microorganisms.

"But in people with celiac sprue, the stable 33-amino acid peptide causes big problems because the molecule is recognized as being a threat to the person's immune system,"

Khosla and his coworkers believe the bacterial enzymes, which worked in human tissue cultures as well as intact rats, may result in a simple, oral supplement that can eliminate the harmful effects of gluten. The treatment approach would be similar to enzyme supplements taken orally by people who cannot digest lactose, a sugar found in milk.

Khosla adds that an approved therapy could be as many as 5 to 8 years away, although research is already underway and the treatment should be testable in people within 2 to 3 years.

(This research is from 2002)

Here's the link: http://www.nsf.gov/od/lpa/news/02/pr0277.htm

Let me know if you've heard about this :)

- Michelle :wub:

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I remember reading about that, and thinking "ok, but is that particular chemical reaction going to finish to completion, and how do you know just how much of the enzyme you need to balance that mass equation". Usually, with lactase, as long as MOST of the lactose is split apart, it's sufficient not to cause any symptoms, but some people are so sensitive, even that's not enough. We're sensitive enough that "breaking up most of the gluten" wouldn't be enough for us either - to prevent damage. So I'll be looking at the follow up testing very closely.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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So if this panned out, and rendered gluten totally harmless, would you guys go back to a regular diet? I'm not sure I would. I've come to the conclusion that wheat isn't particularly good for anyone and I've felt so good since going gluten-free that I don't think I'd revert to my pre-diagnosis way of eating. I might use it before eating out at a restaurant though, or on a special occasion, but not every day.


Carolyn

"When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. "

- Hunter S. Thompson

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I would stay gluten free. This pill may help with symptoms but may still cause damage. I am very skeptical.

Something to help with reactions(that you get by accident) would be nice but as far as I am concerned...I will continue being gluten free

I would have to evaluate further after testing and so forth is done...at this point I am very skeptical of it.


Kaiti

Positive bloodwork

Gluten-free since January 2004

Arkansas

Jeremiah 29:11- "For I know the plans that I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for you to prosper and not harm you,plans to give you a hope and future"

"One Nation, Under God"

Feel free to email me anytime....jkbrodbent@yahoo.com

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As with all new therapies, I would probably take a wait and watch mentality. I do this even with some of the new wonder drugs for other things or immunizations for my kids. I figure if it is still shown to work with minimal side effects after several years, then I'll try it. Even then, I would probably just keep it around for special occasions. I just can't see taking anything else if I don't have to.


Donna

South Georgia

9 yrs gluten-free

...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!

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I'd certainly do the new therapy, once it was tested and proved to be totally effective, of course. I think they would be able to tell with endoscopy's if it really worked or if there was still intentinal damage.

Would I change my entire diet to a gluten one again... the answer to that is no, however I was not a huge bread eater/gluten eater before. But it would be nice to go to a restaurant and pop and pill and not have to worry about salad dressings and seasonings and such. I'm eating well now and happy with that but with all the travel I do it would certainly take a lot of the worry out of my life.

Susan

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My thoughts are the same as Tiffany's... I would wonder--how could we be sure the supplement would account for every nook and cranny gluten could get it, and every chain we'd ingest? Will be interesting to see what happens....


~~~~~~~

Jen

Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005

dairy-free

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This sort of treatment, I would consider taking when going out to eat - though I'd still choose items that ought to be gluten-free - or attending special events, but that'd be about it. After two years without bread, who needs it! ;-)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I would be thrilled to have a "pill" to take, especially when eating out. I find the hardest part of being gluten free is the constant "worrying" about what to eat. I miss the days of just "grabbing a bite." Eating out was a huge part of my family's social life and now I just can't do it any more without a lot of planning.


Kathy C.

Ft.Lauderdale, Fl.

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I would stay gluten-free for SURE but agree with Susan. When I have to eat out I get anxiety ridden. If I could take a pill where I knew I wouldn't get sick, I would still order gluten-free but not feel so worried. It would be GREAT!

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Peptidase supplement product for Gluten ingestion now available

http://www.kirkmanlabs.com/products/enzyme...60_Spec230.html :D

Research at Stanford University School of Medicine regarding Peptidase dietary enzyme supplement:

http://mednews.stanford.edu/releases/2002/...ber/gluten.html

Originally posted by Michelle:

http://www.nsf.gov/od/lpa/news/02/pr0277.htm


Diagnosed with Celiac March, 2005: Positive endoscopy, blood tests and biopsy. Gluten free since March 2005.

Retested Jan. 2006: Negative blood tests: "Results do not support a diagnosis of celiac disease. Serological markers for celiac disease were not detected."

Results for 2006 endoscope/biopsy pending.

Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong.

-Thomas Jefferson

Give me the storm and stress of thought and action rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will but first let me eat of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge.

- Robert Green Ingersoll

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Folks, this is NOT a proven treatment for celiac. As the Stanford scientists say, a whole lot more study has to be done. They have no idea if this works inside the human body or even if it did work, how much you would have to take. Do NOT buy this stuff thinking you can take it and suddenly eat all the gluten you want.

richard

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Yes we know its not proven... I think that was said but the question was... if it was proven would you eat gluten regularly and take the "pill" or would you mostly avoid it and use it occasionally.

Personally as I said, my diet it healthier this way but I'd certainly use it when I go out to dinner.

Susan

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"Yes we know its not proven... I think that was said but the question was... if it was proven would you eat gluten regularly and take the "pill" or would you mostly avoid it and use it occasionally."

Ah, but if you go to the first link celiachap posted, you might think these folks have a proven product for celiac. They do not.

I should have been clearer about what I was refering to.

richard

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"Yes we know its not proven... I think that was said but the question was... if it was proven would you eat gluten regularly and take the "pill" or would you mostly avoid it and use it occasionally."

Ah, but if you go to the first link celiachap posted, you might think these folks have a proven product for celiac. They do not.

I should have been clearer about what I was refering to.

richard

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

:(

We can wait five, ten, or twenty years until (or if) this product is approved for pharmaceutical use, or we can try it now.

Since the overall tone of the responses to my postings regarding this has been negative, by "advanced members" (lol), I will not bother to post the results of my personal use of this product on this board. :P


Diagnosed with Celiac March, 2005: Positive endoscopy, blood tests and biopsy. Gluten free since March 2005.

Retested Jan. 2006: Negative blood tests: "Results do not support a diagnosis of celiac disease. Serological markers for celiac disease were not detected."

Results for 2006 endoscope/biopsy pending.

Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong.

-Thomas Jefferson

Give me the storm and stress of thought and action rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will but first let me eat of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge.

- Robert Green Ingersoll

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Uh, that's helpful. I'm not sure I see a major upswelling of reaction by "advanced" members here. I, for one, would be interested, but I'm not going to beg. :P

Stephanie


Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04

Gluten-free since 10/04

Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)

Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07

Fibromyalgia, 6/11

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IMO, "personal" experence in this case is not very usefull. Unless you have been using it a while. and have had an enscopy to measure if any damage has been done, all you can realy speak to is symptons. I am far more concerned with damage the symptons.

Thats just my opinion, others will disagree I am sure. :)


- Vincent -

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:(

We can wait five, ten, or twenty years until (or if) this product is approved for pharmaceutical use, or we can try it now. 

Since the overall tone of the responses to my postings regarding this has been negative, by "advanced members" (lol), I will not bother to post the results of my personal use of this product on this board.  :P

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey I'm interested in your personal experience! :)

- Michelle :wub:

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An Email, from Kirkman Labs, received by one of our Celiac.com members today, in response to an inquiry:

DPP IV Forte is just one enzyme. It does help with casein and gluten, but works better in conjunction with other enzymes. We have several customers who use it together with the Enzyme Aid or Enzyme Complete for when they think they may need extra help

The Enzymaid is specifically for dairy and wheat proteins. It may help with some additional proteins but has nothing for carbs or fats.

Enzym-Complete is a broad spectrum enzyme. Meaning that it helps with all food proteins and carbohydrates and fats it also includes the enzyme DPP IV that is specific to casein and gluten.

We never recommend using enzymes to replace a gluten free diet. They are meant to be an aid to help with hidden gluten or infractions either intentional or accidental. The enzymes break down the proteins, but they may not get every molecule and the effectiveness is going to depend on the sensitivity of the person and the severity of the infraction.


Diagnosed with Celiac March, 2005: Positive endoscopy, blood tests and biopsy. Gluten free since March 2005.

Retested Jan. 2006: Negative blood tests: "Results do not support a diagnosis of celiac disease. Serological markers for celiac disease were not detected."

Results for 2006 endoscope/biopsy pending.

Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong.

-Thomas Jefferson

Give me the storm and stress of thought and action rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will but first let me eat of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge.

- Robert Green Ingersoll

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This is all I need to see.

"We never recommend using enzymes to replace a gluten free diet."

And from the company's web site.

"These statements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease."

I've been gluten-free for almost four years and went from very near death to healthy again simply by being gluten-free. That's my experience. Although this company has that warning at the bottom of the web page, the rest of it reads like they've found a cure.

richard

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They always get excited about that sort of stuff. They are close to making money! The better convincing they are, the more the public will want it.


MD

I had a negative blood test.

Diagnosed by Enterolab 6/05, positive for gluten intolerance genes and antibodies.

My mother also diagnosed positive by Enerolab.

My grandmother diagnosed positive by a blood test.

Checking other relatives...

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And from the company's web site.

"These statements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease."

I've been gluten-free for almost four years and went from very near death to healthy again simply by being gluten-free. That's my experience. Although this company has that warning at the bottom of the web page, the rest of it reads like they've found a cure.

richard

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That warning is required to be put on *all* supplements & vitamins. It doesn't mean that they don't have any value.

I wouldn't (ever) give up the gluten-free diet because of claims from a company manufacturing an unproven product - but, who knows! It could be beneficial when you ingest a particle of gluten - not a great deal, but enough to damage your villi. My greatest concern is that the particle wouldn't come in contact with the enzyme.

I'm also concerned with their statement: "effectiveness is going to depend on the sensitivity of the person and the severity of the infraction." I think it's true that while some people are more noticably reactive - *all* celiacs are sensitive to minute amounts of gluten - and damage to the villi has been shown when only .1 gram of gluten has been ingested. Yikes!

I'm still interested in hearing what celiachap has to say about this though. Even when I am unbelievably careful, I sometimes (accidentally) get glutened. It's not enough to give me a GI response, but my emotional response is absolutely horrible. I would consider taking this enzyme before eating out or hell, maybe all the time - if it might help me to digest that microscopic amount of gluten that makes me crazy.

- Michelle :wub:

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It could be beneficial when you ingest a particle of gluten - not a great deal, but enough to damage your villi.  My greatest concern is that the particle wouldn't come in contact with the enzyme. 

I would consider taking this enzyme before eating out or hell, maybe all the time - if it might help me to digest that microscopic amount of gluten that makes me crazy. 

- Michelle :wub:   

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That's exactly the way I feel about it. Even if DPP-IV only helps partially, as in the case of an accident, it's probably worth taking every day. Once I find out that I am OK with the DPP-IV, and (maybe) an associated multi-enzyme formula from Kirkman, I am going to take it on a daily basis. One of their multiple-enzyme products, Enzym-Complete, already has some DPP-IV included. They suggest augmenting that with the stand-alone DPP-IV (when needed). I think that the multi-formula has protease in it, which MAY be bad for celiacs to take.* Going on a regimen like this (provided it's safe) will hopefully improve the overall digestion process, and possibly protect against damage from accidental injestion due to contamination or restaurant errors. The fact that this company specializes in making products for patients that often have multiple allergies, intolerances, etc., is reassuring.

*http://www.enzymestuff.com/conditionceliac.htm


Diagnosed with Celiac March, 2005: Positive endoscopy, blood tests and biopsy. Gluten free since March 2005.

Retested Jan. 2006: Negative blood tests: "Results do not support a diagnosis of celiac disease. Serological markers for celiac disease were not detected."

Results for 2006 endoscope/biopsy pending.

Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong.

-Thomas Jefferson

Give me the storm and stress of thought and action rather than the dead calm of ignorance and faith. Banish me from Eden when you will but first let me eat of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge.

- Robert Green Ingersoll

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