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What Is Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein?

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Here's what Wikipedia has to say about it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrolyzed_protein

Hydrolyzed protein is protein that has been hydrolyzed or broken down into its component amino acids. While there are many means of achieving this, two of the most common are prolonged boiling in a strong acid (acid-HVP) or strong base or using an enzyme such as the pancreatic protease enzyme to stimulate the naturally occurring hydrolytic process.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that "[t]he chemical breakdown of proteins may result in the formation of free glutamate that joins with free sodium to form MSG" [1] When added this way, American law does not require the labels to list MSG as an ingredient.[1].

Can those with a scientific background elaborate on this in any way? I have always consciously (instictively) avoided it in hair care products (and any other products). Is this really necessary?

Is it really just another way of saying MSG?

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Hydrolyzed wheat protein isn't pure MSG. Protein is usually a mix of all the amino acids. Whatever proportion is glutamate ends up as MSG. Wheat protein is favored for making MSG because it has a very high proportion of glutamine compared to other foods. Wheat hydrolysate is typically 25-30% glutamine, which turns into MSG when salt is added.

This is part of why MSG used to be on old celiac lists. It used to be made from hydrolyzed wheat. Nowadays, most American MSG is made by engineered bacteria. Supposedly (can't remember where I read it) there is still wheat-derived MSG in China. It's also why there is wheat in soy sauce. Soy sauce that is naturally fermented is largely hydrolyzed and wheat increases the natural MSG content resulting in a richer flavor.

Is it safe? I found this one article cited on Wikipedia that suggests acid hydrolysates would be safer than enzymatic hydrolysates for wheat allergy. I'd expect celiac to be similar.

http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?doi=10.1159/000092000

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Skylark that is very interesting. Thank you.

I always wondered about the wheat in soy sauce...and why it was there.

Hmm very interesting.

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I have read previously that the hydrolyzing process, removed the offending gluten and then, it's processed again, leaving no or only miniscule residue.

Is this true?

Although a blog, this cites varied sources:

http://thesavvyceliac.com/2011/01/20/research-hydrolyzed-wheat-flour-may-be-celiac-safe/

When shopping I come across hydrolyzed wheat starch frequently, most likely different from hydrolyzed wheat flour.

Interesting. :)

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The hydrolyzing process partially breaks down the protein. The protein is a long chain of amino acids, including glutamic acid. The key here is partially--long fragments remain, which may be recognized as gluten. The breakdown of any protein in the body results in the release of free glutamic acid radicals. If they meet up with sodium, they combine to form MSG. Hydrolyzing accelerates the breakdown process, leading to more MSG faster. It is literally true that any and every protein is a source of MSG. The question is how fast it is released, not if it is.

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I have read previously that the hydrolyzing process, removed the offending gluten and then, it's processed again, leaving no or only miniscule residue.

Is this true?

Although a blog, this cites varied sources:

http://thesavvyceliac.com/2011/01/20/research-hydrolyzed-wheat-flour-may-be-celiac-safe/

When shopping I come across hydrolyzed wheat starch frequently, most likely different from hydrolyzed wheat flour.

Interesting. :)

Are you talking about hydrolyzed wheat starch or protein, Lisa? It would be nice if the protein were processed to remove residual gluten. I have read that the starch can be gluten-free if it's processed heavily enough and of course there is the 200 ppm codex starch in Europe. I have read similarly that glucose syrup from wheat is gluten-free. (I'm still not eating it! :lol:)

I saw that Savvy Celiac blog too and checked out the research article. They made a sourdough bread with carefully chosen bacteria and enzymes and there was no detectable gluten at the end. Five brave souls ate the stuff for 60 days, had no symptoms, no increase in TTG, and no damage on endoscopy. Everyone who at normal bread or partially hydrolyzed bread had TTG and some degree of damage. Two of the six controls eating normal bread even chose to drop out of the study. The grains weren't post-processed at all. It's very encouraging.

This blogger got an interesting letter from Kikkoman, where they tested their naturally fermented soy sauce and didn't find allergenicity. The link is in the article. Notice the blogger had some kind of reaction anyway.

http://surefoodsliving.com/2007/05/kikkoman-soy-sauce-claims-its-ok/

Interestingly, rather than marketing it's usual soy sauce as gluten-free, even if it's testing as not-detectable, Kikkoman doesn't seem to have had any faith in the testing. Instead made a new, gluten-free one with rice rather than wheat.

http://www.kikkomanusa.com/homecooks/products/products_hc_details.php?pf=10106&fam=101

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The hydrolyzing process partially breaks down the protein. The protein is a long chain of amino acids, including glutamic acid. The key here is partially--long fragments remain, which may be recognized as gluten. The breakdown of any protein in the body results in the release of free glutamic acid radicals. If they meet up with sodium, they combine to form MSG. Hydrolyzing accelerates the breakdown process, leading to more MSG faster. It is literally true that any and every protein is a source of MSG. The question is how fast it is released, not if it is.

Right, and whether long enough fragments to be troublesome remain and in what amount. Problem is that it may be different according to the process used, and probably from one batch to another.

There are 20 amino acids, so protein will usually yield ~5% MSG if it's fully hydrolyzed. Gluten is unusual to make so much MSG.

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Are you talking about hydrolyzed wheat starch or protein, Lisa? I have read that the starch can be gluten-free if it's processed heavily enough and of course there is the codex starch in Europe.

When reading ingredients, I frequently come across Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch. What I have read, in my layman's brain, I understand that the offending protein is removed during processing, rendering it safe for most people with Celiac to consume.

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When reading ingredients, I frequently come across Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch. What I have read, in my layman's brain, I understand that the offending protein is removed during processing, rendering it safe for most people with Celiac to consume.

You quoted me while I was thinking in the editor. :lol:

That's encouraging about the starch. I wonder how you'd know, though?

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You quoted me while I was thinking in the editor. :lol:

That's encouraging about the starch. I wonder how you'd know, though?

I sense a sucker hole?! Not jumping! :D

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I sense a sucker hole?! Not jumping! :D

You made me laugh out loud. :P Not meant to be a sucker hole, just my own personal paranoia about the word "wheat" on a label. :lol:

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New research by a group of Italian scientists indicates that fermented wheat flour may be a viable option for those suffering from celiac disease.

The study, which appeared in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterology Association, examined the effects of baked products made with a hydrolyzed form of wheat flour on a group of 16 celiac sufferers. The researchers created the fermented wheat flour using sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases, which decreased the concentration of gluten in the baked products.

The participants in the study ranged in age from 12 to 23, were healthy and had been on a gluten-free diet for at least five years. Each received 200 g of baked products every day for 60 days. Six were randomly selected to receive baked products made with natural flour, five were selected to receive products with extensively hydrolyzed flour, and five were selected to receive products with fully hydrolyzed flour. The natural flour contained 80,127 ppm of gluten, the extensively hydrolyzed flour contained 2,480 ppm of gluten, and the fully hydrolyzed flour contained 8 ppm of gluten.

“This is the first time that a wheat flour-derived product is shown to not be toxic after being given to celiac patients for 60 days,” said Luigi Greco, M.D., Ph.D., the lead author of the study.

Two of the six participants that ate the natural-flour products dropped out of the study due to symptoms that included abdominal pain and diarrhea. Those on the extensively hydrolyzed-flour diet reported no medical complaints, but researchers did observe that the participants lacked villi, the protrusions in the gut that absorb nutrients from digested food. The participants who ate the baked products containing fully hydrolyzed flour reported no medical complaints.

The researchers added that additional and lengthier trials are necessary to determine if fermented wheat flour is safe for all celiac sufferers.

“A period of 60 days, although repeatedly shown to be sufficient to evaluate gluten toxicity in the majority of patients, might not be long enough to evaluate toxicity in all celiac disease subjects who might show different sensitivity to gluten. Prolonged trials have to be planned to state the safety of the baked goods manufactured by applying this rediscovered and adapted biotechnology,” the study’s authors concluded.

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The study, which appeared in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterology Association, examined the effects of baked products made with a hydrolyzed form of wheat flour on a group of 16 celiac sufferers.

Wow! Sixteen subjects. How did they get so many? Seriously, that is not a big enough sample to convince me of anything.

Do you have a link to the actual article that you can share with us?

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Wow! Sixteen subjects. How did they get so many? Seriously, that is not a big enough sample to convince me of anything.

Do you have a link to the actual article that you can share with us?

Perhaps not Peter, but I found it interesting.  And pleased that ongoing research is paving the road for all of us.  Sometime, small successes make large impacts. ;)  I would also like to see a link to the study.

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Lisa, I agree that it is interesting. But I'm not going to consider hydrolyzed wheat safe based on such a small study. More study is clearly worthwhile, but I am waiting for more proof.  :blink:

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Okay, I'm trying to post but can't tell what's happening with where I'm typing. I once used Costco hair shampoo while in a Jacuzzi tub soaking in the bubbles. 4 hours later the symptoms hit. It took me awhile but it could only be the shampoo with hydrolyzed wheat protein. Guess you could say I steeped in it. Another time I used a new hair product, a leave in hair conditioner. Went out to PF Chang for lettuce wraps. Yep, never realized how many times I play with my hair. I am super sensitive so it's easier for me to just run any time wheat is mentioned, processed or hydrolyzed.

Are you talking about hydrolyzed wheat starch or protein, Lisa? It would be nice if the protein were processed to remove residual gluten. I have read that the starch can be gluten-free if it's processed heavily enough and of course there is the 200 ppm codex starch in Europe. I have read similarly that glucose syrup from wheat is gluten-free. (I'm still not eating it! laugh.gif)

I saw that Savvy Celiac blog too and checked out the research article. They made a sourdough bread with carefully chosen bacteria and enzymes and there was no detectable gluten at the end. Five brave souls ate the stuff for 60 days, had no symptoms, no increase in TTG, and no damage on endoscopy. Everyone who at normal bread or partially hydrolyzed bread had TTG and some degree of damage. Two of the six controls eating normal bread even chose to drop out of the study. The grains weren't post-processed at all. It's very encouraging.

This blogger got an interesting letter from Kikkoman, where they tested their naturally fermented soy sauce and didn't find allergenicity. The link is in the article. Notice the blogger had some kind of reaction anyway.
http://surefoodsliving.com/2007/05/kikkoman-soy-sauce-claims-its-ok/

Interestingly, rather than marketing it's usual soy sauce as gluten-free, even if it's testing as not-detectable, Kikkoman doesn't seem to have had any faith in the testing. Instead made a new, gluten-free one with rice rather than wheat.
http://www.kikkomanusa.com/homecooks/products/products_hc_details.php?pf=10106&fam=101

 

 

You quoted me while I was thinking in the editor. laugh.gif

That's encouraging about the starch. I wonder how you'd know, though?

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