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Roy Jamron

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About Me

Roy S. Jamron holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Engineering Applied Science from the University of California at Davis, and independently investigates the latest research on celiac disease and related disorders.

  1. Careful here... The research only establishes an "association" between high serum levels of persistent organic pollutants and celiac disease and does not establish that those pollutants are an actual "cause" of celiac disease. The high pollutant serum levels can also be explained by the high...
  2. Gluten-Free Bread Without Potato Starch For the benefit of those intolerant to potato starch or nightshades, I decided to try a few variations of this gluten-free bread without potato starch. First, since my last posts, I found adding a bit more water increases loaf height and settled on...
  3. The following March 2019 article provides exciting new findings on the benefits of fasting, fasting-mimicking diet, and cell regeneration resulting from such dieting. It is an "Open Access" article and can be freely read in html or pdf format: Fasting-Mimicking Diet Modulates Microbiota and...
  4. Sustituting Popped and Raw Amaranth Flours for Oat Flour Raw amaranth flour and popped amaranth flour were both investigated as substitutes for oat flour in this gluten-free bread recipe. The resulting amaranth loaves proved to have less than desirable characteristics. A flour blend of 1 cup...
  5. Brown or Ivory Teff Flour Substitution for Oat Flour? The answer: It makes no difference. The photo above shows a loaf made using Bob's Red Mill brown teff flour. Even cutting back the buckwheat flour to 1-1/4 cups and the steeping water to 2-1/4 cups, the bread height still rose to...
  6. Substituting Teff For Oat Flour Ivory Maskal Teff Flour is substituted for oat flour in the above shown photo. The flour blend used consists of 1 cup ivory teff flour, 1 cup sweet white sorghum flour, 1-1/2 cups raw, dehulled buckwheat flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 2/3 cup arrowroot starch...
  7. Replacing Oat Flour with Quinoa Flour The photo above shows the quinoa (no oats) version of the Perfect 4 Inch Tall gluten-free Bread. This version uses a flour mix of 1 cup rinsed and toasted white quinoa flour, 1 cup sweet white sorghum flour, 1-1/2 cups raw dehulled buckwheat flour...
  8. Longer Mixing Time Boosts Bread Height Bread loaves made with identical ingredients are compared in the above photo. The taller loaf on the left was made from dough mixed for 35 minutes. The loaf on the right was made from dough mixed for 16 minutes at the same speed. The loaf on the...
  9. Further evaluation of millet flour as a replacement for oat flour in this bread recipe has revealed some disappointing millet flour properties. Millet flour produces a denser, firmer texture and harder crust than in bread using oat or extra sorghum flour. Unlike the oat or additional sorghum non...
  10. Substituting Millet Flour For Oat Flour The above photo shows the result of substituting millet flour for oat flour in the recipe. The version shown uses 1-1/4 cup sorghum flour, 1-1/4 cup buckwheat flour, 1 cup millet flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 2/3 arrowroot starch plus an additional...
  11. Celiac.com 09/28/2018 - MIT researchers have found that intestinal stem cells removed from mice after fasting for 24 hours and grown in culture have twice the regenerative capacity of stem cells...
  12. This is a summary of some bread recipe test variations. First, adding non-soluble baker's yeast beta-glucan to the no-oat recipe did nothing to increase bread volume or height. Only water soluble beta-glucan can be expected to have an affect on bread volume, and oat beta-glucan is the only...
  13. Pizza_lover: I am very happy you were able to benefit from my pursuits. You really should submit your own article to Celiac.com to share your success with flat breads. I am still concentrating on getting the most height and volume out of gluten-free breads and looking more into beta-glucan...
  14. For those of you sensitive to oats, I tested a non-oat loaf of the bread by substituting the cup of oat flour with another cup of sorghum flour to make a flour blend of 2 cups sorghum flour, 1 cup buckwheat flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 2/3 cup arrowroot starch. The result is shown in the photograph...
  15. This recipe has only been vetted for the flours and ingredients as described in the recipe and article. You are encouraged to try substitutions to meet your specific needs, but these substitutions may alter the qualities of the bread. You may be able to omit oat flour and simply replace with more...