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alcie

Untreated Gluten Sensitivity Long Term Effects?

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We're currently trying to figure out of my daughter is celiac or just gluten sensitive (she has high dgp IGG numbers but is IGA negative) and I think I'm gluten sensitive.  It looks like there are a lot of research articles on long term effects of untreated celiac but not non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  Does anyone know if there are long term health effects (besides current gluten reactions) to not eating a gluten-free diet if gluten sensitive?

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I think the long term effect for a gluten sensitivity will depend on what is causing them. Because there are at least 5 or 6 reasons I can think of, and who knows how many reasons I don't know for it, it will be hard to know. To me, it seems that the best thing would be to rule out Celiac and then look from there.


 

 

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If she has high dgp igg numbers then she wouldn't be just gluten sensitive. Have they tested the total IGA? If total IGA is low then her IGA related tests will be a false negative. The test she is positive on is one that is specific to celiac and you only need to have one test be positive to be celiac. Be sure to stay on gluten until all celiac related testing you choose to do is done then get strictly gluten free. 


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If she has high dgp igg numbers then she wouldn't be just gluten sensitive. Have they tested the total IGA? If total IGA is low then her IGA related tests will be a false negative. The test she is positive on is one that is specific to celiac and you only need to have one test be positive to be celiac. Be sure to stay on gluten until all celiac related testing you choose to do is done then get strictly gluten free. 

 

Here are her numbers, I'm not sure if her IGA numbers are low or just within the normal range.

 

2014:

Demediated Anti-Giladin IGG: 33 strong positive (20-30 is a weak positive, 31+ is a strong positive)

Demediated Anti-Giladin IGA: 1 negative (normal is 0-19)

TTG IGA: less than 2 (negative is 0-3)

Total IGA: 42 (normal is 44-89)

 

2015:

Demediated Anti-Giladin IGG: 33 strong positive (high is greater than 20)

Demediated Anti-Giladin IGA: 2 (high is greater than 20)

TTG IGG: 2 (high is greater than 6)

Quantitative IGA: 52 (normal range is 33-235)

 

As a side note I was also tested in 2009 and came back with similar results.  My GI said I had damage based upon the scope but that it was not Celiac.  I don't know what damage he saw but he said he could see it without the biopsy results.  I do not have either genetic marker.

AGA IGG: 45.1 (high was greater than 10)

AGA IGA: 1.5 (high was greater than 5)

TTG IGA: 1.2 (high was greater than 4)

Total IGA: 155 (range 44-441)

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From what I understand, the current thinking is that food sensitivities, when not treated, create inflammation which over time can lead to other health complications such as heart disease, cancers, or simply pain like arthritis. It sounds like it could be a cause of future health problems, but it is sort of like smoking - not everyone gets lung cancer. 

 

It comes down to the fact that eating problem foods could cause health problems. If you know you are sensitive to gluten, it must already be causing you problems. You should be tested.

 

DGP tests do NOT indicate NCGS. If they are positive it indicates celiac disease.  On the other hand, SOME doctors think the AGA (anti-gliadin antibodies) tests may indicate NCGS but it USUALLY indicates celiac disease if positive.  To me, it looks like you both have celiac disease.

 

These articles discus the tests:

http://drrodneyford.com/extra/documents/279-gliadin-antibody-confusion-same-name-different-test.html

http://cvi.asm.org/content/17/5/884.full#T1

http://www.worldgastroenterology.org/assets/export/userfiles/2012_Celiac%20Disease_long_FINAL.pdf


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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Only my DGP IGA was positive. All others on the complete celiac panel were normal. My biopsy showed severe intestinal damage. I think you both need endoscopies. If you choose not to, then go gluten free. Chances are you have celiac disease. I went with the biopsy because my husband had been gluten free for over a decade. I could not believe that we'd both have it!


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