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StClair

Basic Celiac Question

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I hope I can ask this clearly. Do migraines, joint problems, osteoporosis, anxiety (I'm newly diagnosed celiac and have all of these), and the like, all come from gut problems, malabsorption, etc? In other words, since gluten causes an autoimmune reaction in the intestines, does it also get into the bloodstream and cause an autoimmune reaction in the brain, joints, bones, etc, or are all these problems caused secondarily by malabsorption/vitamin deficiencies in the gut?

Sorry if my question is not clear! I'm so curious about what has been happening in my body all these years.


Celiac Disease, diagnosed April 1, 2015

Migraines, Esophagitis/Gastritis, Lower Digestive Issues, Osteoporosis, Anxiety, Arthritis, etc--some improving.

DQ2.2 and DQ2.5 trans

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The autoimmune reaction starts in the gut, but those antibodies get into the bloodstream and circulate around the whole body. I don't think the biological mechanisms for all of the problems that can be seen in celiacs are known.

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Many problems can come from the inflammation it causes as well.

 

I don't completely believe that the damaged intestines is the sole cause of vitamin deficiencies and malabsorption.  I am certain that I had celiac disease my entire life, yet I had no vitamin or malabsoption issues even though I am sure I had extensive gut damage.  I guess the damaged intestines do have an impact on those who suffer from those symptoms, but it can't be the only reason it happens or we would all have those symptoms.  KWIM?

 

I don't think "they" really know why it causes such problems yet.  With less than 1% of the population having celiac disease, and it not requiring any medication to treat it, I don't think they do much research into it.  Money wise, it isn't worth it.


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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If you think the medical community understands celiac disease or gluten issues, I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell. What I do know is that since going gluten free, my life has improved immeasurably in manifold ways. No more depression or anxiety. I sleep better. No more snoring. No more gut aches. No more coughing.

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It's an eye-opener how little research there is, unless I am not looking int the right places.  I guess there are not enough of us to justify funding.  My curiosity is intense, but I guess I'll have to get used to not understanding certain things.  Not the only area of life this is true for, I guess.   I'll take the improved heath, though, whether I understand it or not!


Celiac Disease, diagnosed April 1, 2015

Migraines, Esophagitis/Gastritis, Lower Digestive Issues, Osteoporosis, Anxiety, Arthritis, etc--some improving.

DQ2.2 and DQ2.5 trans

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There are more neural connections in the gut than there is in the brain. These connections control a whole host of biochemical reactions throughout the body and endocrine system. Any damage in the GI tract can manifest itself in other parts of the body and definitely will effect your health, the way you feel and how chemical messengers tell your body what to do. 

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