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benjamin1993

Been gluten-free for 4 weeks - ate gluten two days ago and feel like I have the flu?

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Hey guys - For the last few years I've dealt with energy issues, emotional lethargy, grogginess, and recently OCD, so I decided to go gluten-free 4 weeks ago. After a week of dizzy spells, irritability and insane cravings it felt like a veil had been lifted from me - I felt lighter on my feet, endlessly energetic, and most of all, so very happy. 

Two days ago, I ate a LOT of gluten - a whole plate of breaded chicken thinkig it was battered in corn starch (newb issues, I guess) and within 30 minutes it felt like I had been hit by a truck: extreme fatigue, sudden depression, sense of hopelessness. The next morning was worse, and today I have felt no better and am experiencing swollen eyes and sinusitis.

Before going gluten-free I had never had a reaction like this. Can anybody relate? 

 

 

 

 

Edited by benjamin1993

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Welcome.  You might consider staying on gluten and seeing your doctor for a celiac blood test panel.  You need to be consuming gluten for several  weeks prior to the blood draw otherwise the tests can be invalid.   You could have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity.   The only way to know for sure is to get tested as there are over 200 symptoms attributed to celiac disease and those can overlap with other illnesses.   Best to rule out celiac disease. 

Learn more: 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/

Celiac disease symptoms are like a chameleon -- always changing.  

 


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Yes! Being gluten-free for a significant amount of time, and having a gluten exposure, will make your body have a greater reaction to gluten. At least for many if not most of us. I'm not sure of the logistics, but there is a reason for it as well. Take it easy, eat simple whole foods, bone broth if possible, lots of water.... hopefully you will feel better very soon.

But cyclinglady was right. You probably should actually stay on gluten until you get tested for celiac disease so you know for certain this is your issue. You have found a great community here to help you. Welcome!

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I agree that you should keep eating gluten and get tested if you can.  The reason for the increase in symptoms after being gluten free is the antibodies flaring in response to you injesting what your body doesn't want you to consuming.  Your body is letting you know in no uncertain terms that gluten is not something it wants.  You don't have to consume a lot of gluten for testing. A couple slices of bread worth is enough.  There is a chance with most of your issues sounding like they are neuro related for a false negative. After testing you should IMHO go back to being strictly gluten free no matter what the results. Keep in mind that many doctors consider celiac to be a solely GI problem and won't test if you don't have gastro issues.  Sounds like your body is giving you the answer but a formal diagnosis can be helpful with family members and freinds taking the condition as seriously as you need to take it.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Hi Benjamin and welcome :)

You've found a good site. Everyone above has given you good advice I just wanted to reinforce this point from Ravenwoodglass:

15 minutes ago, ravenwoodglass said:

After testing you should IMHO go back to being strictly gluten free no matter what the results.

Some people (like me), test negative for celiac but still have a problem with gluten. This is called Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and is not a well known or understood condition. Suffice to say if you do test negative, you shouldn't assume that gluten is fine for you, it may well not be.

Best of luck!

Matt

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Thanks for the thoughtful replies, everybody!  I want to highlight that it's just been almost 4 weeks since I've eliminated gluten (and I've been very strict about it) - prior, I could eat gluten with no issues that like this. A sandwich would rob me of energy, but not in a way I could associate with having eaten the sandwich. How insane that four weeks off of gluten could produce this new exposure reaction for me  

1.5 weeks into being gluten-free I felt well enough to taper off my OCD meds and so, while I haven had had any noticible negative reactions, SSRI withdrawals can resemble gluten exposure (although the symptoms I don't think are often delayed) - so I wonder if a weird mix is happening there. 

And also... I'm mostly just stunned that my body could react so extremely now to what it used to take with relative ease a mere 26ish days ago. It's good to know this is an actual thing and not me being dramatic about my new eating regimen. :) 

It literally feels like death and like I'll never getting through it - but I'm staying reasonable about it and woke up this morning feeling less terrible (although I've had to make several trips to the bathroom - tmi I know). 

Thanks so much!

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1 hour ago, benjamin1993 said:

Thanks for the thoughtful replies, everybody!  I want to highlight that it's just been almost 4 weeks since I've eliminated gluten (and I've been very strict about it) - prior, I could eat gluten with no issues that like this. A sandwich would rob me of energy, but not in a way I could associate with having eaten the sandwich. How insane that four weeks off of gluten could produce this new exposure reaction for me  

1.5 weeks into being gluten-free I felt well enough to taper off my OCD meds and so, while I haven had had any noticible negative reactions, SSRI withdrawals can resemble gluten exposure (although the symptoms I don't think are often delayed) - so I wonder if a weird mix is happening there. 

And also... I'm mostly just stunned that my body could react so extremely now to what it used to take with relative ease a mere 26ish days ago. It's good to know this is an actual thing and not me being dramatic about my new eating regimen. :) 

It literally feels like death and like I'll never getting through it - but I'm staying reasonable about it and woke up this morning feeling less terrible (although I've had to make several trips to the bathroom - tmi I know). 

Thanks so much!

Feel free to discuss ANYTHING here. Nothing is tmi! We have heard it all. And you can be as dramatic as you like, we will still be here for you. 

SSRI's are a bear to come off of. I got off one and for MONTHS I had the zaps in my brain. I must say I did not do it slowly or carefully and put myself in the throngs of withdrawal. Did you get off your med with the help of a doctor? (It's best to do so.)

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2 hours ago, Victoria1234 said:

Feel free to discuss ANYTHING here. Nothing is tmi! We have heard it all. And you can be as dramatic as you like, we will still be here for you. 

SSRI's are a bear to come off of. I got off one and for MONTHS I had the zaps in my brain. I must say I did not do it slowly or carefully and put myself in the throngs of withdrawal. Did you get off your med with the help of a doctor? (It's best to do so.)

Hey, yes I did! I haven't had a single associated symptom that I know of, minus feeling sleepy for one day and having this weird washy sound in my head that has since disappeared. Thank you so much for your kind openness!

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10 minutes ago, benjamin1993 said:

And yes, I tapered with the help of a doctor. 

Good to hear you tapered with your doctors assistance. Many drugs are very dangerous to stop suddenly and not just in terms of the withdrawl.  I tapered off all meds also at diagnosis and have only had to add back in my 'as needed' Alprazolam. I take that for something not celiac related though.

Things can be up and down for a bit when we go gluten free. Hang in there.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Yes I can relate. I describe  the feeling as having run a marathon and  being hit by a Mac truck just after crossing the finish line. A fatigue, exhaustation, annihilation type experience. Lol

 welcome and the veterans above gave excellent advice. Best Wishes on the journey of testing and healing. 

We're here.

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What was your gluten free diet like? I wonder if, when you were gluten-free, you went more whole food, less processed food? Or did you continue to eat processed food that was just gluten free? One reason I ask is that I have cut way back on grains and processed foods like gluten-free bread, but occasionally allow myself a treat which is a gluten-free biscuit southern-style from the gluten-free bakery nearby. There is no better sleeping pill in the world! I am knocked out. I’m not saying you’re not Celiac, I’m just curious what your diet was replaced with. You’re definitely reacting to something, and in a way you’re lucky to know what that is!

Plumbago


Diagnosed with Celiac in 2010. Diagnosed with sleep apnea 2018.

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