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Trouble swallowing choking on my own saliva?

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For the past week I've been having trouble eating and swallowing I choke on my own saliva and water when i do eat it feels like its going down the wrong way. I called my doctor tonight and she wants to do an xray on my throat to make sure everything is alright.  The thing is with this coronavirus thing going around I dont want to risk going into a lobby and catching something worse than whatever's happening to me. On top of that my doctor was coughing when I was speaking to her on the phone, not sure if I should risk it or not .

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Do you have celiac that has presented with nervous system symptoms? I had severe nerve impact and this did happen to me prediagnosis. I do think it would be wise to see your doctor. You do not want to choke to death and you need to find out what is happening. I realize that this is a scarey time to have to go but some doctors will have masks at the office you could put on and gloves if you don't have your own. If you are newly diagnosed and not yet healed call the office and ask to talk to a nurse about what precautions you can take. I know how scarey this is and I hope it resolves for you soon. 

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I experienced swallowing difficulty and excessive salivation before my celiac disease diagnosis.  It was due to thiamine deficiency.  

My dentist frequently commented on how much saliva I produced, but no explanation was given.  I couldn't understand why I had such trouble swallowing if I had that much saliva.  Nevertheless, everything I ate stuck in my throat.

Thiamine is one of the eight essential B vitamins.  The eight B vitamins and vitamin C are water soluble.  They are lost quickly during diarrhea and malabsorption conditions like Celiac Disease  or alcoholism.  

A deficiency in Niacin, Vitamin B3, can cause excessive saliva, too.  If you're low in one of the B vitamins, you may be low in some of the other B vitamins.  They all work together to keep your body healthy.  

Thiamine is used by the lower brain which controls things like the release of digestive juices, insulin, and saliva.  Thiamine also is needed to regulate heart beat rate and blood pressure.  I experienced  Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) which recently has been related to thiamine deficiency. Here's an article on this...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28531358

 

The World Health Organization has a quick screening test for thiamine deficiency:   

      Can you rise from a squat?

I squatted down in the grocery store to get something off the bottom shelf and, for the life of me, could not stand back up.  I was stuck.  It was scary, and embarrassing, too.  I had to topple over, get on all fours and then pull myself up.  

My walking changed.  I adopted a wider stance and rather waddled. Yes, like a duck.  Poor reflexes and foot drop occurs.  Thiamine is important to nerve function.

I'm one of those that went undiagnosed for years.  My health declined as my deficiencies got worse.  Subclinical nutritional deficiencies are not recognized by doctors anymore.  Blood tests for vitamins may not reliably reflect a deficiency.  And thiamine deficiency can have severe consequences if not remedied. 

One of the earliest symptoms of Thiamine deficiency is dysphagia, trouble swallowing....

Here's an article about that...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18379741

I'm not diagnosing.  I'm relating my experience.  Since my doctors were clueless, I took it upon myself to find answers.  Thiamine.  I took lots of thiamine.  I continue to take thiamine.  I have a higher metabolic need for it since I have T2 diabetes.  You need thiamine to help your pancreas make insulin.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376872/ 

I suggest you call your doctor and ask about trying thiamine.  Thiamine is water soluble.  Any your body doesn't need will be excreted in urine.  

To treat thiamine deficiency, a doctor can give an IV with thiamine, or thiamine can be taken orally....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3293077/#!po=32.8947

I order oral supplements online and get home delivery.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Thiamin-HealthProfessional/

I hope this helps!   Stay safe.  Stay well.  

Eat more LIVER!😸

 

Edited by knitty kitty
Clarification

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1 hour ago, knitty kitty said:

I experienced swallowing difficulty and excessive salivation before my celiac disease diagnosis.  It was due to thiamine deficiency.  

My dentist frequently commented on how much saliva I produced, but no explanation was given.  I couldn't understand why I had such trouble swallowing if I had that much saliva.  Nevertheless, everything I ate stuck in my throat.

Thiamine is one of the eight essential B vitamins.  The eight B vitamins and vitamin C are water soluble.  They are lost quickly during diarrhea and malabsorption conditions like Celiac Disease  or alcoholism.  

A deficiency in Niacin, Vitamin B3, can cause excessive saliva, too.  If you're low in one of the B vitamins, you may be low in some of the other B vitamins.  They all work together to keep your body healthy.  

Thiamine is used by the lower brain which controls things like the release of digestive juices, insulin, and saliva.  Thiamine also is needed to regulate heart beat rate and blood pressure.  I experienced  Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) which recently has been related to thiamine deficiency. Here's an article on this...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28531358

 

The World Health Organization has a quick screening test for thiamine deficiency:   

      Can you rise from a squat?

I squatted down in the grocery store to get something off the bottom shelf and, for the life of me, could not stand back up.  I was stuck.  It was scary, and embarrassing, too.  I had to topple over, get on all fours and then pull myself up.  

My walking changed.  I adopted a wider stance and rather waddled. Yes, like a duck.  Poor reflexes and foot drop occurs.  Thiamine is important to nerve function.

I'm one of those that went undiagnosed for years.  My health declined as my deficiencies got worse.  Subclinical nutritional deficiencies are not recognized by doctors anymore.  Blood tests for vitamins may not reliably reflect a deficiency.  And thiamine deficiency can have severe consequences if not remedied. 

One of the earliest symptoms of Thiamine deficiency is dysphagia, trouble swallowing....

Here's an article about that...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18379741

I'm not diagnosing.  I'm relating my experience.  Since my doctors were clueless, I took it upon myself to find answers.  Thiamine.  I took lots of thiamine.  I continue to take thiamine.  I have a higher metabolic need for it since I have T2 diabetes.  You need thiamine to help your pancreas make insulin.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376872/ 

I suggest you call your doctor and ask about trying thiamine.  Thiamine is water soluble.  Any your body doesn't need will be excreted in urine.  

To treat thiamine deficiency, a doctor can give an IV with thiamine, or thiamine can be taken orally....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3293077/#!po=32.8947

I order oral supplements online and get home delivery.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Thiamin-HealthProfessional/

I hope this helps!   Stay safe.  Stay well.  

Eat more LIVER!😸

 

I've had blood wok done a few weeks ago they said I was really low on Vitamin D but not anything else. I may look into that too.  

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Yes, I was severely deficient in Vitamin D.  My doctor was shocked at how low it was.  He prescribed D2, which is synthetic.  My body didn't like it.  I got the natural form, D3.  My body liked those.  I craved those little capsules.  I ate them like m&m's.  It was crazy.  However, recent research confirmed that high dose supplementation is the best way to correct a deficiency.  

There's the eight B vitamins and Vitamin C that are water soluble.  Then there's four fat soluble vitamins, Vitamins A, D, E, and K.  It's rare to have a deficiency in just one vitamin.  If you're low in Vitamin D, you're probably going to be low in others.  I have eye problems because I was deficient in Vitamin A during the same time I was deficient in Vitamin D.  

And then there's minerals like iron, magnesium, calcium, and more besides.  If you're not absorbing your vitamins, you're probably not absorbing minerals either.  I also have Osteoporosis and iron deficiency anemia. Deficiencies lead to dysfunction. 

Here's an article that explains it...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820055/

Another on B12 deficiency and how tests don't always show deficiency....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2696961/#!po=6.94444

The vitamins are used in your tissues.  The body will steal vitamins out of the organs and tissues to send to the brain via the blood stream.  So, while the blood stream may have "normal" levels, your tissues and organs are doing without.  They don't work well that way.  During times of illness or stress or strenuous activity, your metabolic requirements for vitamins increase.  Your body's stores of water soluble vitamins can be depleted in as little as ten days.  

Products made with wheat are required by law to be enriched with vitamins because processing wheat into flour removes the vitamins found in the wheat germ.  Many of the vitamins used to enrich these foods are synthetic, and there's some debate as to their bioavailability and quantity.  RDA guidelines may have been set too low. 

Gluten free products are not required to be enriched.  

When you go gluten free, you lose a big source of vitamins.  If you're eating gluten free processed products, you're setting yourself back because you need more vitamins (thiamine especially) to process those empty carbs.  

You really have to take nutrition seriously. Knowledge is power.  Arm yourself with knowledge.  Doctors get about fifteen minutes of nutrition education out of their seven years of training. My doctors missed my deficiencies.  They were so intent on writing prescriptions...heavy sigh.

One more for good measure....deficiency symptoms....

https://www.podiatrytoday.com/when-vitamin-and-nutritional-deficiencies-cause-skin-and-nail-changes

Hope this helps!

 

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After taking 10,000 i.u. of D3 a day for two years, when I was tested my level was 44.7 ng/mL. Optimum is in the 70's. And my health insurance declined to pay for the test as it was unnecessary. That level of supplementation would have put a normal body at 80 ng/mL. That was after 5 years gluten-free.

5 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

However, recent research confirmed that high dose supplementation is the best way to correct a deficiency.

 

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5 hours ago, Wheatwacked said:

After taking 10,000 i.u. of D3 a day for two years, when I was tested my level was 44.7 ng/mL. Optimum is in the 70's. And my health insurance declined to pay for the test as it was unnecessary. That level of supplementation would have put a normal body at 80 ng/mL. That was after 5 years gluten-free.

 

Here's the study about high dose Vitamin D supplementation.  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4128480/#!po=24.4681

I definitely took more than 10,000 out a day.  My health began to improve almost immediately.  My level has been measured as in the eighties.  I try to keep it there.  Being so low, it took several months to rebuild my stores of Vitamin D and get to a place where I felt more "normal".  You're not going to absorb 100% of what you eat.  You have to saturate your system.  

Hope this helps!

 

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10 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

Found some more articles on Vitamin D.  

Vitamin D needs magnesium to work well...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29480918

And Vitamin D and sunlight....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3897598/

Hope this helps!

Thank you for posting so much detail I really appreciate it. I'm seeing an allergiest in a few days, not sure if she can check my vitamins levels or not. I may look into get the B12 supplement but only a low dosage since I haven't been diagnosis yet. 

 

 

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You should get tested before supplementing with Cobalamine (Vitamin B12).  You need to get a baseline.  MMA and  homocysteine levels should be measured, as well as ferretin, folate and iron.  Once you start supplementing, the test results will be artificial higher and will skew the real levels.  Better to wait without supplementation in order to get an accurate measurement.

In the meantime, you can add more foods to your diet that contain these vitamins.  

Thiamine (Vitamin B1) will help the dysphasia.  Thiamine is found in peas, Lima beans and liver.

Cobalamine (B12) is found in eggs, fish and meat, like liver.  

Learn about the different vitamins and minerals your body needs.  Learn which vitamins are in the foods you eat and which foods you may want to incorporate into your diet.  Keep a food/mood/poo'd journal to help you track your vitamin intake.  

If you owned a fancy car, a Ferrari or a Lamborghini, you'd want to put the best fuel in it so it would run a peak performance level...  Your body is the same.  You need to put the best fuel into it so it runs well and lasts a long time.  Learn what makes your engine run.  Knowledge is power.

Hope this helps!

Eat more LIVER! 😸

 

Edited by knitty kitty
Typo

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On 3/20/2020 at 6:03 AM, Wheatwacked said:

After taking 10,000 i.u. of D3 a day for two years, when I was tested my level was 44.7 ng/mL. Optimum is in the 70's. And my health insurance declined to pay for the test as it was unnecessary. That level of supplementation would have put a normal body at 80 ng/mL. That was after 5 years gluten-free.

 

If you are curious to know your levels, you can order the test and pay for it yourself. It should be between $75 and $99. Not cheap, but it may give you piece of mind. I would think that if you were ever deficient, your doctor would order at least an annual D level, and if she or he did, then insurance would pay for it. Just request your doctor to order it at your annual physical.

Now is probably not the best time for various reasons owing to Covid-19 to be doing routine lab work though. Just my .02.

_______________________________________________________________________

To the OP:

Have you thought of consulting a speech pathologist? They are often the people who deal with swallowing issues, and I bet they are taking online appts these days!

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I agree with above posters. I have nerve issues too. During my challenge I had a knot sensation in my throat , my neck swells in inflammation,  I am more prone to bite my tongue on the sides, and coughing fits due to salvia and swallowing issues. They improve with gluten-free diet. Sometimes my nerve issues dysfunction get triggered and I scared my husband a few months ago with my random coughing fit. I inhaled before talking  or something and the epiglottis seemed to be delayed in response.   I too watch my b vitamins, d, magnesium as well.

I know I'm fortunate to be able to feel my feet etc.  I am learning to accept that I am lucky but not unscathed. I have a coworker who revealed he had a celiac father with neurological issues. He gently  reminds me to take my b12. I do wonder if he notices my symptoms at times.

Good luck 

 

 

Edited by Awol cast iron stomach
Forgot statement

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On 3/18/2020 at 1:08 AM, CottenCandyDream said:

For the past week I've been having trouble eating and swallowing I choke on my own saliva and water when i do eat it feels like its going down the wrong way. I called my doctor tonight and she wants to do an xray on my throat to make sure everything is alright.  The thing is with this coronavirus thing going around I dont want to risk going into a lobby and catching something worse than whatever's happening to me. On top of that my doctor was coughing when I was speaking to her on the phone, not sure if I should risk it or not .

Hello, I , too, went thru same symptom [years] bf I was diagnosed. I had barium swallow which revealed nothing! It wasn't until years later that i found out that this was a symptom of my bodies growing allergic reaction to gluten. There were initial symptoms of: stuffiness, swallowing, small bouts with anxiety, perpetual post nasal drip and occasional heart palpitations. Then approximately 3 years later my body totally gave up to celiac disease. 

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On 3/22/2020 at 5:08 PM, plumbago said:

your doctor would order at least an annual D level, and if she or he did, then insurance would pay for it.

You need to be in the 20's before you are considered medically deficient. After insurance declined payment the doctor only charged me $20. 

On 3/21/2020 at 3:30 AM, knitty kitty said:

Learn about the different vitamins and minerals your body needs.  Learn which vitamins are in the foods you eat and which foods you may want to incorporate into your diet. 

I'll add to that: or supplement to guaranty sufficient absorption until your gut heals. One of the references above, concerning hypovitaminosis and obesity. pointed out that vitamin D is stored at a higher level in adipose (fat) tissue than in serum. So a person with a fatty gut will have a lower D level in the blood, where it is useful, than a person with less fat, given the same intake; the fat sucks it up.

Quote

Based on its review of data of vitamin D needs, a committee of the Institute of Medicine concluded that persons are at risk of vitamin D deficiency at serum 25(OH)D concentrations <30 nmol/L (<12 ng/mL). Some are potentially at risk for inadequacy at levels ranging from 30–50 nmol/L (12–20 ng/mL). Practically all people are sufficient at levels ≥50 nmol/L (≥20 ng/mL); the committee stated that 50 nmol/L is the serum 25(OH)D level that covers the needs of 97.5% of the population. Serum concentrations >125 nmol/L (>50 ng/mL) are associated with potential adverse effects [1] … With the exception of measures related to bone health, the health relationships examined were either not supported by adequate evidence to establish cause and effect, or the conflicting nature of the available evidence could not be used to link health benefits to particular levels of intake of vitamin D or serum measures of 25(OH)D with any level of confidence. This overall conclusion was confirmed by a more recent report on vitamin D and calcium from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which reviewed data from nearly 250 new studies published between 2009 and 2013 [41]. The report concluded that it is still not possible to specify a relationship between vitamin D and health outcomes other than bone health. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

Even so, in the text of this fact sheet there is this:

Quote

In 2011, The Endocrine Society issued clinical practice guidelines for vitamin D, stating that the desirable serum concentration of 25(OH)D is >75 nmol/L (>30 ng/ml) to maximize the effect of this vitamin on calcium, bone, and muscle metabolism [40]. It also reported that to consistently raise serum levels of 25(OH)D above 75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml), at least 1,500-2,000 IU/day of supplemental vitamin D might be required in adults, and at least 1,000 IU/day in children and adolescents.

 

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On 3/19/2020 at 6:41 PM, knitty kitty said:

I experienced swallowing difficulty and excessive salivation before my celiac disease diagnosis.  It was due to thiamine deficiency.  

My dentist frequently commented on how much saliva I produced, but no explanation was given.  I couldn't understand why I had such trouble swallowing if I had that much saliva.  Nevertheless, everything I ate stuck in my throat.

Thiamine is one of the eight essential B vitamins.  The eight B vitamins and vitamin C are water soluble.  They are lost quickly during diarrhea and malabsorption conditions like Celiac Disease  or alcoholism.  

A deficiency in Niacin, Vitamin B3, can cause excessive saliva, too.  If you're low in one of the B vitamins, you may be low in some of the other B vitamins.  They all work together to keep your body healthy.  

Thiamine is used by the lower brain which controls things like the release of digestive juices, insulin, and saliva.  Thiamine also is needed to regulate heart beat rate and blood pressure.  I experienced  Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) which recently has been related to thiamine deficiency. Here's an article on this...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28531358

 

The World Health Organization has a quick screening test for thiamine deficiency:   

      Can you rise from a squat?

I squatted down in the grocery store to get something off the bottom shelf and, for the life of me, could not stand back up.  I was stuck.  It was scary, and embarrassing, too.  I had to topple over, get on all fours and then pull myself up.  

My walking changed.  I adopted a wider stance and rather waddled. Yes, like a duck.  Poor reflexes and foot drop occurs.  Thiamine is important to nerve function.

I'm one of those that went undiagnosed for years.  My health declined as my deficiencies got worse.  Subclinical nutritional deficiencies are not recognized by doctors anymore.  Blood tests for vitamins may not reliably reflect a deficiency.  And thiamine deficiency can have severe consequences if not remedied. 

One of the earliest symptoms of Thiamine deficiency is dysphagia, trouble swallowing....

Here's an article about that...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18379741

I'm not diagnosing.  I'm relating my experience.  Since my doctors were clueless, I took it upon myself to find answers.  Thiamine.  I took lots of thiamine.  I continue to take thiamine.  I have a higher metabolic need for it since I have T2 diabetes.  You need thiamine to help your pancreas make insulin.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376872/ 

I suggest you call your doctor and ask about trying thiamine.  Thiamine is water soluble.  Any your body doesn't need will be excreted in urine.  

To treat thiamine deficiency, a doctor can give an IV with thiamine, or thiamine can be taken orally....

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3293077/#!po=32.8947

I order oral supplements online and get home delivery.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Thiamin-HealthProfessional/

I hope this helps!   Stay safe.  Stay well.  

Eat more LIVER!😸

 

B vitamin malabsorbsion also causes anxiety and depression

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3 minutes ago, Shalome said:

Thank You! Near death experiences at night chocking on my saliva and during day when fully awake, no one cld tell me why!! Thank You!! Amen

If you are waking up choking on your saliva, you might consider getting evaluated for sleep apnea (when the pandemic subsides a bit).

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9 hours ago, Shalome said:

Near death experiences at night chocking on my saliva and during day when fully awake, no one cld tell me why!

My post nasal drip was so thick I had to pull it out of my nose like rubber cement glue. As an adolescent they removed my tonsils. I think that helped only because now there are fewer obstacles for it to stick to. C-Pap helps my son and brother, but begs the question: Why? Since increasing my vitamin and mineral supplements to 100% RDA of 15 of them it rarely occurs now. I suspect high fructose corn syrup is involved but that seems too simplistic. I also had my swallow reflex lock up when drinking cold water. I had to spit it out to breath. I think it was irritated vagus nerve. Like one unending hiccup. That hasn't happened recently either. Anyway, both are scary as heck. You can't even call for help!

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try taking an antihistamine like benedryl if you're havingh trouble swallowing. the mild allergies are very pervasive. i have an allergy to sesame seeds and i didn't notice because they were attached to a burger, then i had a sesame cracker one time and it burned like acid. 

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