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joemoe003

Finding A Boyfriend

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The best thing to do is to find someone who cares for you, respects you, and makes efforts to understand your condition. If it so happens that he also has celiac disease, I guess that is a bonus since you would share that lifestyle in common. However, there is a world of wonderful people out there and I would not exclude a guy just because he does not have celiac disease. If you join a local celiac disease association or group for teens, you just may meet someone that way. You are young and just entering the dating scene, which is harrowing enough without putting a lot of special criteria on people! Good luck!

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Honestly, I've always thought about the same thing since I was diagnosed with celiac disease. And seeing how, after 21 years, I've still yet to go on a date or have a boyfriend, now it makes me wonder about this even more.

I'm like all the rest of you:

I'd like to have a bf/maybe husband with Celiac, because they know how you feel. They know what you go through. You dont have to feel weird about cooking your own meals.

The downside: Hard to find those. I dont even KNOW any young man in SK w/it or even ones whos heard of it!

Thats why the other way would work. But they'd have to be more understandable and much more supportive. They have to be prepared to deal with all you're low points and how to treat you during those times. They need to repect you greatly. They have to eat foods they've probably never even heard of before. They cant take you on a date to a meal unless they want to pay big bucks or risk you getting sick, or cook you some romantic meal at home unless they know how the gluten-free foods work. They shouldnt be someone flat broke--who would help you out if you run short of cash when buying your gluten-free foods to live??

I dont know..its so hard to choose..At this point I'd take almost anyone who I liked and who liked me back :P Gets lonely after so long!

~lisa~

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I wonder what the percentages are on the possibility of the children having celiac disease or gluten intolerances if only one parent has it... I hope it isn't as "dominating" genetically as it is over my life!

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Guest Ziggy10

Dating someone without celiac would be difficult.. because right off the bat you have to get into the fact that you can't have this or that.. and you'd have to go to a certain place and eat a certain thing and I imagine it could be a real date destroyer for the person without it. I think we'd have to ask the non-celiac population if they considered Celiac a turn off :P . Unless of course you've got that clever bit of charm to make it amplify your attractiveness.

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Dating someone without celiac would be difficult.. because right off the bat you have to get into the fact that you can't have this or that.. and you'd have to go to a certain place and eat a certain thing and I imagine it could be a real date destroyer for the person without it. I think we'd have to ask the non-celiac population if they considered Celiac a turn off  :P . Unless of course you've got that clever bit of charm to make it amplify your attractiveness.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Is it really that big of deal? I mean if someone with diabetes or another food allergy was going out with someone and said I can't have that and explain why that would not matter...celiac is no different. Any person that is worth your time will consider celiac to be very minor.

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Guest Ziggy10

I completely agree! Maybe I'm just surrounded by shallow people but I've seen lots of relationships fail on the stupidest reasons. Esspecially in high school.

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I completely agree! Maybe I'm just surrounded by shallow people but I've seen lots of relationships fail on the stupidest reasons. Esspecially in high school.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It gets a little bit different later on in life from my experience.

In college I have found people are more accepting. People could care less about the diet I am on. I am considered normal just like everyone else...there are just certain things I can't eat..they ask about it and want to know more...some don't understand it but they are still pretty accepting and go with the flow. Yes, you run into some people who are not nice about it but on the whole I think people have been good about it.

In high school I could see things being alot different and more people being rude with things they may do and say regarding celiac.

The more they age though usually the more they mature and will probably realize how minor of an issue that would be for someone they care about.

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anyone who has a problem with a medical condition is not worth the time. yes, most people in college don't really care and leave you alone. i have always had medical issues and i am always upfront with people, especially someone i am going on a date with. if they don't understand or don't try to understand then that person is so not worth it! i don't think that you can go around just looking for a bf that is gluten-free or has the saem health issues, you are really going to limit your options. my requirement for going out with someone is being comfortable enough with him that it doesn't bother me to tell him some of my restrictions. just have fun! we are all young and should just enjoy ourselves! no need to be tied down right now, the right person will come along when it is time. :)

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Since there aren't any other celiacs in my area, there's no way I can date one. hahha :lol: But I have found a great guy and he's really supportive. He tries his best to understand my diet and it's cute as heck when he asks questions. :P He wears one of those green celiac zero band bracelets i bought and he's starting to learn what I can and can't have. Having a bf with celiac disease might seem easier, but it might not be as much fun gettin to know each other or watchin them learn :lol: and if you meet someone w/o celiac disease and they don't like you for who you are, then they're not worth your time anyway. B)

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Here's a view from an old one--hehe. I'm 50 ;) and dating again. At this point in life, honestly most of the guys are pretty easy with this. By this age, most everyone has some kind of health issue and are more understanding. To be honest, even my co workers watch out for me. I have never been glutened by a kiss.

I dont think you should go out in the world and try to find a gluten-free/bf that is celiac. Love is hard enough to find without putting that kind of restrictions on it. A person that truly loves you will work through all this with you. It is much easier living in as gluten free household, but I have done both and was fine with others too. My grandkids run to me with a kiss, I worry sometimes, but I would never turn them away. If a kiss glutens me, then ummmmmmmmm, oh well. Life is full of chances--crossing the street could kill you much faster then celiacs will. So, just look for love and let it all fall into place. Deb

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There aren’t enough males with celiac to go around, so you have no choice but to take matters into you own hands and implement a solution that will be to your advantage. One option is to create a “celiac” by convincing a boy that he also has problems with gluten.

You could bake some bread and/or cakes and secretly lace them with milk of magnesia or other diuretics/laxatives – and give it to a potential boyfriend that has commitment issues. When he gets the result, viola: instant celiac symptoms! You’ll probably have to do it a few times. Have him get tested anyway, and show concern, but just keep slipping the appropriate things in his glutened food until he tries going gluten free and feels better. This will change his life, and you’ll be right there to support and nourish him in his newfound gluten-free lifestyle.

Remember the old saying, “All’s fair in love and war”. :wub: Let me know if you plan on doing this, so I can remove the posting and circumvent the possibility of him getting wise to the scheme.

Hope this helps! :lol:

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There aren’t enough males with celiac to go around, so you have no choice but to take matters into you own hands and implement a solution that will be to your advantage. One option is to create a “celiac” by convincing a boy that he also has problems with gluten.

You could bake some bread and/or cakes and secretly lace them with milk of magnesia or other diuretics/laxatives – and give it to a potential boyfriend that has commitment issues.  When he gets the result, viola: instant celiac symptoms!  You’ll probably have to do it a few times.  Have him get tested anyway, and show concern, but just keep slipping the appropriate things in his glutened food until he tries going gluten free and feels better.  This will change his life, and you’ll be right there to support and nourish him in his newfound gluten-free lifestyle. 

Remember the old saying, “All’s fair in love and war”.  :wub: Let me know if you plan on doing this, so I can remove the posting and circumvent the possibility of him getting wise to the scheme. 

Hope this helps!  :lol:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

:lol::lol: Too funny ...that gave me a good laugh

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I saw this topic and just wanted to throw my 2 cents in. Ok so there are the obvious benefits of having a bf or gluten-free who is celiac disease; but I think the right person will be considerate of your needs regardless of being celiac disease or not. I have to be honest, I'm completely shocked at how awesome my husband is about my celiac disease. This sounds awful, but it's because we have a running joke that whenever I'm sick (not because of gluten - flu sick), he is awful at taking care of me. But he has gone so out of his way to educate people around us, talking to waiters in restaurants and searching out food for me.

Don't limit yourself to someone with celiac disease - you'll be amazed what you'll find.

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Guest BERNESES

Really- what you can and cannot eat doesn't matter- all that matters is that you care about each other's needs.

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yeah, i completely agree B) . people with serious peanut allergies or other more serious allergies have a similar idea of what's going on, but a boyfriend with celiac disease would be nice :D

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Don't go out set on finding a gluten-free guy/girl for a significant other...you'd limit yourself so much. The *right* one for you will accept you regardless and should be willing to work with you and be SUPPORTIVE! That in itself only comes across once in a blue moon, and if you're looking for that extra part (gluten-free) you'll completely pass up a potential mate!

Say...had I decided I only wanted to keep dating blond guys I would have never given my incredible and perfect-for-me brunette fiance a chance!

Edited by mightymorg

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Don't limit yourself...I mean sure it would be nice but it's not essential. I found a great guy and he is so supportive and helpful. As long as your significant other is understanding and helpful everything is fine:)

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Hey. I have considered the thought that having a gluten-free boyfriend would be great too. When I was dating my past boyfriend, my stomach pain started about a month before we dated, and so he knew that I was always sick, but was still great. and when we found out what was making me sick, he was wonderful about it, and happy that I could be healthy again. I think I was more picky about gluten free foods than he was. haha. one morning he came over and made me pancakes, because we had a mix, and I wanted to try them. And he would always make sure that my brothers didn't add spices to my meat for dinners and stuff. And he was very willing to eat what I could.

It was the night of prom, and we had chicken from Costco for dinner, that we cooked up. well, as we were leaving, I got sooooo sick from it. (turns out they injected unknown objects into it) and so our pictures were terrible, but he was wonderful about it, and I downed a ton of stomach relievers. lol. We ended up having a great time.

But now that we're dating other people, to see if we are as perfect for each other as we hope. It's kind of scary. I feel bad when I go to a restraunt with people, and all I can have is a dry salad. So I've been kind of reluctant to date. The best advice I can have for you is to not be reluctant like I am. Open up, and say, "Hey, I have food allergies, but I know I can eat at these places" and don't be shy about it. If he wants to go out with you, he evidently likes you, don't push him away. :) and have fun! :)

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I'd still like to find a guy who's gluten-free. I told a bunch of my male friends (not that I have many) about the no gluten before a kiss issue, and only one of them didnt freak out, he said "really..." in a "wow" and "thats interesting" way. And I mentioned it enough that I think he got the point hes supposed to remember it. :P

Too bad I havent talked to him in almost a month :(

Hes always been so supportive of me even tho he lives nowhere near me. I found the perfect potential bf who accept my gluten-free self. Now to just talk to the boy again ;)

No idea why I replied to this again, guess I'm just very lonely :P

~lisa~

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I have been with my boyfriend for about 1 -1/2. All I have to say is that he is wonderful :D . He always tries everything first and makes sure that I am eating properly. And when we go out he usually orders everyhting gluten-free so that I can try some of his food and we can share. I def. got lucky with this one :)

Amanda NY B)

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Even if whoever you're dating is not celiac, you may find out later on that they are. I discovered my boyfriend had celiac a few months after meeting him (2002). We had a pretty serious converstion about his symptoms almost matching my pre-diagnosis sypmtoms, and he's been gluten-free ever since. I've always thought that was pretty neat. It turned out to be really helpful for both of us.

But then again, both of us being gluten free could be pretty annoying. Stupid tiffs over the validity of each other's gluten-free product knowledge, and me worrying a great deal about whether or not he was taking the gluten-free thing seriously enough. I guess overall it was a positive thing- both of us being celiac.

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Don't be selfish!

Think of your kids and and even their kids!

Try to get your celiac genes mixed with non-celiac ones...

It will be better for your upcoming kin! :D

Am I being too pragmatic, or what? ;)

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Hello Joe My name is chris and i have been recently diagnosed with celiac disease and DH (dermatitus herpetaformus) i've been sick for so long.... didn't even realize i had this problem till now. I've been in serious pain because of the DH (celiac disease of the skin) its caused me so much more pain then just eating Wheat.... I dont mind being your BF lol i'm only 16 yrs old , you can atleast chat with me online :lol: my messenger is Yahoo or MSN , (yahoo > chrissm2006) (msn > warrioroflight)

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I have been saying the exact same things to my family, "why can't I just meet a boy who has Celiac." It would make things -a lot- easier. I would appreciate a guy who went gluten-free for no reason, well besides the fact that he likes me, but it would still be just easier. Anyone know a safe way to meet teenager (13-20) celiac disease people?

Anyone is welcome to chat with me; SolitaryRedRaven (AIM) and solitaryredraven@gmail.com (MSN).

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