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penguin

What's In Your Olive Oil?

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The problem I have with these articles is that they're full of "may be" and "might be" and "could be" and completely devoid of any real examples. Why doesn't he tell us what some of the major olive oil companies actually do? Maybe because what they do isn't really as bad as he makes it sound?

I don't doubt that we might get some inferior oils and I wish we would use the same standards as Europe, but I think the author is also making this sound like a HUGE problem without offering any proof that it is indeed a problem. In addition, if anybody is using soy in olive oil it now HAS to be clearly labeled as such in the U.S. (although some old labels still can be in circulation).

richard

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I don't understand how they can not label it accurately, for anyone with an allergy to soy this is obviously a health issue if they are mixing soy oil in.

This is unbelievable! I have used olive oil exclusively (baking, too! It's fine) for most of my adult life and this is such discouraging news. But, thank you, Chelsea, for the info. It would be nice to know some trustworthy brands. I prefer an oil from Kalamata, Greece and have always assumed it is what it says it is. I'll do some research and see if I can come up with anything.

lisa(used to log in as "Laferriere" but it wouldn't work- hope I've figured it out now!)

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Guest BERNESES

that's true, lovegrov about the soy and hazelnut.... since they are major allergens they would have to be labeled in the US. But, what is canola oil? is it made from corn?

I read the back of my Fellipio Berio olive oil last night (standard, supermarket olive oil) and it said, basically it was 100% pure olive oil, made in Italy, but basically from the low grade leftovers of the good stuff from Turkey, Spain and one other country (I forget). So it's olive oil, it's just not good standard olive oil :P

For anyone interested, check out cooc.com for California olive oils that are certified. Colavita also seems to be high quality.

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I read about the "possiblity" of "watering down" the olive oil in the US - so I looked for and found one that I use exclusively, EVOO, cold pressed, imported from Greece and less than 1% accidity:

Iliada Kalamata Extra Virgin Olive oil

The 'Golden Selection' of the Iliada Kalamata Extra Virgin olive oil First and cold pressing-naturally low acidity less than 1. The olive oil is pressed from Koroneiki olives and from groves in the South Peloponesse.

Acidity:<1% Type:Extra Virgin

Producer:AGROVIM S.A.

I haven't had any problems when I stick to just this, just in case some of this is true, better safe than sorry.

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Canola is made from rapeseed. In addition, corn is not one of the top 8 allergens so it does not have to be clearly labeled, although many do so anyway.

richard

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Somewhere around here in another thread, can't recall where I read it, (oh, it could have been on the Avoiding Corn board)....anyhow, another poster revealed a conversation with a server at a restaurant. She/he inquired about canola oil (sometimes those severely allergic to corn cross react with canola oil) and she told the server she would get very sick if she had any canola oil and he quietly admitted to her that they use half olive oil and half canola oil fo their cooking oil.

Actually this is a pretty standard thing for a cook to do. It raises the flash point of the olive oil. It is always a good idea to ask the server to ask the cook if they do this if it is a concern.

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