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Hello there, sorry I am new here, but I have seen conflicting views on corn and just do not know what to believe in for sure.

"Though corn (maize) is one of those grains that many people -- not just celiacs -- may be allergic to, it is not a grain that is thought to cause damage to the villi in celiacs. It is tolerated by most celiacs."

https://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-51107127626.77

If this is bad for you, how can it be safe?

I tried searching to find the answer, but was not completely conclusive. I hope you all may help :) Thank you for your time, I really appreciate this so much!

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Welcome!

Corn is gluten-free.

Some people are allergic to corn ... that is what your quote is saying. It's not a celiac thing ... it's a food allergy thing for some people, celiacs and non-celiacs alike.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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From what I have been told, corn and even rice have gluten in them, but it is a different type of gluten than what we refer to as gluten. Why it is called by the same name, I do not know. You can eat corn safely unless you have a corn allergy. Some people do.

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Some people, including some celiacs, are allergic to, or intolerant to, corn. Corn does not contain a protein that triggers the celiac auto-immune reaction, so it is safe from a celiac point of view.

Soy is another food to which many people are allergic or intolerant. But again, this is a different issue than celiac disease.

I am allergic to crustacean shellfish, but this does not mean that all celiacs must avoid shrimp and lobster.

I hope this helps.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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Welcome!

Corn is gluten-free.

Some people are allergic to corn ... that is what your quote is saying. It's not a celiac thing ... it's a food allergy thing for some people, celiacs and non-celiacs alike.

Thank you Carla! That is such a relief. I must have misread the statement. Maintaining a gluten-free lifestyle is very hard. I make a pinto bean dip that I wanted to incorporate some corn chips with. This is what it contains

http://www.fritolay.com/fl/flstore/cgi-bin...ProdID_3059.htm

"Ingredients: Whole corn, corn oil, and salt. No preservatives"

So I assuming I am okay on this :)

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It is only difficult in the beginning. There is a steep learning curve!

I would eat the bean dip. I usually make my own, but that looks safe to me.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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It is only difficult in the beginning. There is a steep learning curve!

I would eat the bean dip. I usually make my own, but that looks safe to me.

That is relieving :) You guys are wonderful, I am already in love with this place. By the way my name is Patrick, it's nice to meet you all! And it's nice to feel home.

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From what I have been told, corn and even rice have gluten in them, but it is a different type of gluten than what we refer to as gluten. Why it is called by the same name, I do not know. You can eat corn safely unless you have a corn allergy. Some people do.

The word "gluten" literally means grain protein. In theory it can refer to any cereal protein.

We normally use it to mean four specific grain proteins: wheat, rye, barley and oats. The first three definitely trigger the celiac autoimmune reaction. Oat protein is not so clear, but most celiacs avoid it. Most oats are contaminated with wheat, and so contain wheat gluten.

"Corn gluten" is the protein in corn; it is not a celiac issue. Neither is "rice gluten," although you generally see "rice protein" instead. Glutinous rice is not a problem either. Glutinous means sticky. It is all very confusing at the beginning.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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Thank you Carla! That is such a relief. I must have misread the statement. Maintaining a gluten-free lifestyle is very hard. I make a pinto bean dip that I wanted to incorporate some corn chips with. This is what it contains

http://www.fritolay.com/fl/flstore/cgi-bin...ProdID_3059.htm

"Ingredients: Whole corn, corn oil, and salt. No preservatives"

So I assuming I am okay on this :)

Just a quick heads up while the Fritos may be ingredient safe my family have found that Frito Lay are products to avoid. The CC issues with this company are extreme. Consume with caution and if you have a reaction don't think you have developed another sensitivity until you drop their products and try a less risky brand.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Actually, Corn is NOT gluten-free. All grains contain gluten, it's just that scientific studies have determined that the gluten in Barley, Rye, and Wheat is the type that causes damage to the intestinal villi. Oats are avoided because of contamination with Wheat. There is belief among some celiac's that uncontaminated oats may still cause problems for Celiacs.

Corn contains gluten. So if you get sick after eating corn then you should avoid it because it's probably causing some damage somewhere in your body.

Personally, I can eat a little bit of corn, but if I go a period where I eat corn products everyday, I get sick.

-Scott

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I do okay with stuff made from corn meal (corn chips, bread, etc) but WHOLE corn kernals go through me like wheat, except the poo doesn't have that classic "gluten-poo" look. I've also heard non-celiacs talk about "corn-poo" and I'm assuming they have the same issue.

For me, gluten causes D for a day or two along with a few days of abdominal pain (pain/cramps last longer than the D). Corn causes 1 episode of D, without the abdominal pain. So, I assume (and hope I'm right) that the corn is not doing any damage to my intestines.

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