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sammers1

Kids Cereals.....

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As far as I know, you're safe as long as you read the label on those cereals. Every now and again the formula will change and they will add in wheat starch or something, but it is always listed on the label.

If the package you have or see in the store does not have wheat listed, then it isn't in there.

I've never been brave enough to try those cereals, except Fruity Pebbles, which I don't think has ever had wheat (or any of the other nasty stuff) added to it.

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My son has been gluten free for 2 and a half years and Fruity Pebbles and Cocoa Pebbles have been safe the whole time. Of course read the ingredients every time you buy just in case. Trix is also safe right now. They were safe in the beginning of us being gluten free, then they added wheat in again, then they took it out again. So right now it is safe, as long as your box says so ;) .

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I thought cocoa pebbles had carmel coloring in it? Can't carmel coloring contain gluten? I recently tried fruity pebbles since going free, just today actually, and had some interesting digestive stuff happen. I am new to being a celiac (2 weeks) and it may be too soon to tell if it was from that, or something else. I was just recently glutened (i think?) because I had really bad stomach cramps and gas after eatting at a 'gluten free' restaurant last night, so who knows, maybe my stomach stuff was still left over from the night before. I have no idea how long 'being glutened' symptoms last..but I am not going to eat fruity pebbles again.


Depression, asthma, a million enviromental allergies, psoriasis,

fatigue, sleepy after eating, extreme IBS symptoms, muscle and body pain apon waking, acne

when I never had it before - all developed (or at least became obvious) in the last 5 years

Diagnosed Gluten Intolerant November '07

Happily (for the most part) gluten free for 3 months, go me!

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I thought cocoa pebbles had carmel coloring in it? Can't carmel coloring contain gluten?

Caramel coloring can contain gluten. But Post Cocoa pebbles is made by Kraft foods. They have a policy of clearly declaring any gluten containing ingredients on the label. If their caramel coloring had gluten in it, it would be listed.

I have boxes of both Fruity and Cocoa pebbles in the house right now, and both are gluten-free. Trix was also gluten-free the last time I bought it, but the formula goes back and forth. You have to check the label on all these things before you buy them.


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

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Aeshlea--it's way too soon to tell what's OK and what's not for you--at only 2 weeks into the gluten-free diet, your gut is still reeling from all the gluten exposure you've had all your life--give it time--eat really safe foods for a few weeks (bananas, rice, applesauce, refried beans and corn tortillas, etc.), and then start experimenting with more complicated (multi-ingredient) foods to find out what you can tolerate. Here are my newbie tips:

gluten-free newbie tips--now you can eat to treat, and soon feel better. Here are some key coping strategies to get you started.

1. Know that you will grieve your old favorite gluten-filled foods. I actually tear up when I see a brioche sometimes. Grieving is normal, BUT IT IS NOT EASY OR COMFORTABLE. People around you will eat treats you can't have and you will feel sad and isolated. Strategy: stock your car, office, purse, backpack, secret drawer at home with gluten-free treats you can reach for any time you are feeling deprived. This really helped me. I recommend Baby Ruth Bars, Snicker Bars, Lara Bars, Dove Dark Chocolate, meringue cookies, macaroon cookies (read labels), Butterfinger, Reeses Peanut Butter Cups. You get the idea.

2. Know that it will take time (months, probably) to figure out what to eat (it took me 6 mos.) and during this time, it'll be kind of a daily challenge to plan meals. Every time you go to the store it'll be a challenge to choose groceries. Strategy: plan on an hour--don't bring kids or friends. Go the bathroom before you start grocery shopping. Bring your reading glasses--read every label. The good news is, THIS GETS MUCH BETTER OVER THE NEXT SEVERAL MONTHS AS YOU GET USED TO THE DIET.

3. It may take a while for your gut to heal, depending on how damaged it was at the time you went gluten free. So, you are going to have to be patient with your body--some people feel better immediately after going gluten-free, but most of us take longer than that. Don't give up if you don't see instant results. Strategy: Maximize your general health by getting enough rest, water, exercise, and limiting stress. Maximize your digestive health by limiting foods that are hard on the gastrointestinal tract until you're feeling better: limit irritants like dairy, caffeine, alcohol, and fried foods--these are all hard to digest--go back to them when you feel your gut is recovering.

4. Accept right now that it will be YOUR job to teach those around you about your diet


Diagnosed in March 2006 by blood test and biopsy. Eleven year old son diagnosed in May 2006. Both gluten-free since diagnosis.

The Susanna (Flagstaff, AZ)

"I GOTTA have more cowbell!."

--The legendary Bruce Dickenson

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