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lonewolf

Becoming A "celiac Educator"

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I'm not sure if this is in the right forum, so a moderator can move it if it fits better somewhere else.

I have developed a growing passion for helping people to learn how to shop, cook and cope with Celiac, gluten intolerance and other food sensitivities. I love my "real" job (teaching PE, Health and coaching basketball), but I'm becoming more and more drawn to the idea of finding a way to earn a living by helping people in the area of Celiac and gluten intolerance.

My naturopath refers people to me occasionally when she diagnoses them with food allergies/sensitivities. She told me last month that I am the most knowledgable person she knows of for Celiac and gluten intolerance and is encouraging me to do something with that knowledge. (I help people for free, but I don't have the time to help all the people that ask for it since I have 4 kids and a job already.) I meet people in the store, friends tell their friends to contact me and it just seems that everywhere I turn I'm running into someone who needs help with their new diet. And I love doing it! I would love to teach cooking classes, especially for kids and parents, take people on tours of stores to help with label reading and shopping and generally be a resource person for people still in that panic mode of "Oh no! What can I eat?"

Does anyone on here have any ideas for what type of certificate or degree or training I could get so I could actually get paid for doing this? I would like to work for a GI clinic or a naturopath's office and be able to have people's insurance pay me or something. I have a degree in Physical Education with an emphasis in Health Education and took a lot of science and nutrition in college. I am a teacher at heart. I can't seem to find any reputable school that offers anything I'm interested in or could afford to do.

Any ideas, anyone?


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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With your educational background and knowledge I don't know how much more education you would need. I do not think you'll find anything celiac specific but perhaps you could add a few more nutrition classes so you have an offical degree in nutrition, but if you have a naturopath and others who trust and refer folks to you already I wonder if you even need that. After all you are not going to be treating anyone medically you are going to be educating them on the ins and outs of celiac.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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your post kinda reminds me of a "Dietician"

I spoke to one from the local hospital at the begining of my "ordeal to overcome the medical world" she didnt have a clue about Celiac itself but helped sort out the list of stuff that made me sick down to "at least 50% of them had gluten"


Just my .00000002 cents worth

If I knew what I was doing years ago I would have half a clue today!

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I think a former poster from this board became a gluten-free consultant, or a lifestyle coach, or something like that. Maybe you could just give yourself a title, and continue to do what you're already doing (but not for free).

Maybe you can look into how Danna Korn does it. I don't know what qualifications she has, but it seems like she's pretty successful.


"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

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I'm not sure if this is in the right forum, so a moderator can move it if it fits better somewhere else.

I have developed a growing passion for helping people to learn how to shop, cook and cope with Celiac, gluten intolerance and other food sensitivities. I love my "real" job (teaching PE, Health and coaching basketball), but I'm becoming more and more drawn to the idea of finding a way to earn a living by helping people in the area of Celiac and gluten intolerance.

My naturopath refers people to me occasionally when she diagnoses them with food allergies/sensitivities. She told me last month that I am the most knowledgable person she knows of for Celiac and gluten intolerance and is encouraging me to do something with that knowledge. (I help people for free, but I don't have the time to help all the people that ask for it since I have 4 kids and a job already.) I meet people in the store, friends tell their friends to contact me and it just seems that everywhere I turn I'm running into someone who needs help with their new diet. And I love doing it! I would love to teach cooking classes, especially for kids and parents, take people on tours of stores to help with label reading and shopping and generally be a resource person for people still in that panic mode of "Oh no! What can I eat?"

Does anyone on here have any ideas for what type of certificate or degree or training I could get so I could actually get paid for doing this? I would like to work for a GI clinic or a naturopath's office and be able to have people's insurance pay me or something. I have a degree in Physical Education with an emphasis in Health Education and took a lot of science and nutrition in college. I am a teacher at heart. I can't seem to find any reputable school that offers anything I'm interested in or could afford to do.

Any ideas, anyone?

You can get a degree and become a registered dietitian - average salary is $50,000... or become a nutritionist, essentially the same, but without the complete degree and credentials (and not as much pay).

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You & I have the same non-paid job!!!!! I have been doing the exact same thing helping others survive the wheat/gluten free world.I sometimes have to many to handle. It just amazes me that people have been dx'd for months & even years & do not know what to eat or cook....or even know how to adapt a recipe....

I have been doing this for several years now. I do get s few perks from stores & also from bakers & mgf's of gluten-free. I'm in the process of starting a friendly group to help people cope & not deprive themselves of a food they totally loved before gluten-free...

I have a couple of doctors who refer patients to me & at times they also have called me for info. But they get the bucks!!!!!

I have traveled across the US, Canada & Alaska to try gluten-free foods--- to meet the bakers & vendors also. I just helpded a vendor from Vermont sample their products while they were in my area...I know what is cream of the crop...... I truly love helping people... I bake gluten-free & give tons away to newbies......

I do not know how to make money from this unless you would be a consultant for a doctors office...For me it is a labor of love...... it is a way to give back.......

god luck & thank you for helping others ...

mamaw

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I'm not sure if this is in the right forum, so a moderator can move it if it fits better somewhere else.

I have developed a growing passion for helping people to learn how to shop, cook and cope with Celiac, gluten intolerance and other food sensitivities. I love my "real" job (teaching PE, Health and coaching basketball), but I'm becoming more and more drawn to the idea of finding a way to earn a living by helping people in the area of Celiac and gluten intolerance.

My naturopath refers people to me occasionally when she diagnoses them with food allergies/sensitivities. She told me last month that I am the most knowledgable person she knows of for Celiac and gluten intolerance and is encouraging me to do something with that knowledge. (I help people for free, but I don't have the time to help all the people that ask for it since I have 4 kids and a job already.) I meet people in the store, friends tell their friends to contact me and it just seems that everywhere I turn I'm running into someone who needs help with their new diet. And I love doing it! I would love to teach cooking classes, especially for kids and parents, take people on tours of stores to help with label reading and shopping and generally be a resource person for people still in that panic mode of "Oh no! What can I eat?"

Does anyone on here have any ideas for what type of certificate or degree or training I could get so I could actually get paid for doing this? I would like to work for a GI clinic or a naturopath's office and be able to have people's insurance pay me or something. I have a degree in Physical Education with an emphasis in Health Education and took a lot of science and nutrition in college. I am a teacher at heart. I can't seem to find any reputable school that offers anything I'm interested in or could afford to do.

Any ideas, anyone?

Liz, what a great idea! You're a natural.

You could just network with your naturopath and other naturopaths and make it informal. I agree with others that you have a great background and may not need a formal education.

On the other hand, you could check out some classes. I'm up by Bastyr University http://www.bastyr.edu/ in Kenmore and they're one of the best naturo schools in the country. (You're in Washington state, but not sure where.) You could meet with a counselor there to see if they have any classes you could take. Or, if you're limited by time/space like I am (I completed my whole Masters degree via online classes from an accredited university) you could try online classes. A good resource is http://www.eatright.org/cps/rde/xchg/ada/h...35_ENU_HTML.htm which is current and has a link to accredited programs offered online. You might not need to get the complete degree but could take classes over time and then when you complete the degree you could work for a GI as a licensed dietitian (maybe when your kids are grown?).

Anyway, if you try the networking method, maybe you could job share and reduce your teaching hours in order to still have insurance, salary etc., without quitting all at once while you build up your business. Also, you could combine celiac education with general sports nutrition education and market to youth sports leagues and individuals - just a thought.

Good luck!

~Laura


Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

"Great difficulties may be surmounted by patience and perseverance." Abigail Adams (1744-1818) 2nd First Lady of the United States

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I have know idea if the following will actually pay but I'll toss them out anyway:

Contact stores that sell gluten free foods and offer to give a class (for pay). I know Whole Foods sometimes has classes but I don't know where they get the teachers.

Contact places that give cooking classes and see if you can teach a class. I have seen these classes in grocery stores and stores that sell cooking equipment. The major draw back is the kitchen also be used to teach classes that prepare gluten meals.


Phyllis

Gluten Free - 30 years

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Contact places that give cooking classes and see if you can teach a class. I have seen these classes in grocery stores and stores that sell cooking equipment. The major draw back is the kitchen also be used to teach classes that prepare gluten meals.

I attended a gluten-free baking class once that was set-up more like a lecture. The teacher talked about the basics of gluten-free baking and reviewed many available mixes and products. It's a popular class and a way of getting around the shared kitched issue.


"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

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You can get a degree and become a registered dietitian - average salary is $50,000... or become a nutritionist, essentially the same, but without the complete degree and credentials (and not as much pay).

I have an interest in doing this too....from what I learned, however, there are more registered dietitians than jobs at this time (due to hospitals closing down a lot of these professionals are competing with each other for jobs). But if you have a source of clients then go for it. It could be the most enjoyable work you've ever done.

I believe there is a website for registered dietitians .... the association who certifies them ...I don't recall the name of the site however...


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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I am interested in this too. I am constantly trying to help people know how to shop and cook and what they can eat and would love to be a "gluten-free" or at least "allergy-free" consultant. Post if anyone has any luck with making this a career.

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Thanks for the responses everyone. It sounds like it isn't quite possible to make a living from this right now. As much as I love doing it, I have to work and earn some money. I guess I'll keep looking into it and keep doing what I'm doing as much as I'm able. Our local health food store owner is interested in having me teach a cooking class for parents/kids, so I think I'll get on their schedule for the spring - after basketball season ends. I "only" work 20 hours a week, but I also coach basketball for 12-15 hours a week, shuttle kids to school, etc. and spend a lot of time cooking from scratch.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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About a year ago, I met a well known dietician who came to our support group to give a lecture on gluten. She had just finished giving the same talk to a group of doctors in our area. I can't for the life of me remember her name, but I wonder how much she makes doing this. She's from Canada ... With your background you'd be a natural. The only problem is that she does a lot of travelling.

I found this while googling celiac dietician though ...

http://www.9wsyr.com/mostpopular/story.asp...3d-df9f90c20c34

Other stores like Natur-Tyme in East Syracuse have their own Celiac Specialist Dietician. That dietician is provided as a service through Natur-Tyme, free of charge. And Natur-Tyme holds Gluten-Free samplings the second Tuesday of every month.

Jan 1990 - Dx CFS/ME/FM (URI's, Ataxia, myoclonus, orthostatic hypotension, insomnia, brain fog, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat... ) Completely Disabled (housebound and bedridden at times)

2004 - Digestive pain all the time.

May 2004 - Hiatal hernia, erosive gastritis, gastroparesis (endoscopy)

August 2004 - Colon polyps, diverticulitus, internal hemorrhoids (colonoscopy)

No relief from Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Zelnorm, Miralax, Imodium, Lomotil ...

July 2005 - GP recommended WFDFSFEFCF + vegan (Also, anything that hurts free)

Immediately stopped needing naps and digestive pain reduced.

Sept 2005 - GFDFCFSFEF + chemical free - Immediately stopped feeling jittery / buzzing and digestive issues were much better.

June 2006 - Dx B12 and iron deficient. Started B12 injections and using cast iron pan.

August 2006 - MYOCLONUS GONE. (off Klonopin)

September 2006 - ATAXIA, INSOMNIA and Feeling like the floor was moving under my feet gone.

June 19, 2007 - Positive DQ2, Dx Celiac

October 2007 - Sleeping like a baby, waking up with energy, but still having fatigue/stamina issues

Nov 2007 - Started Paleo diet for chronic hypoglycemia

April 2008 - GTT normal. I'm no longer hypoglycemic. Started Low oxalate diet for kidney stones.

May 1, 2008 - Began salt loading for OI/NMH - noticed immediately muscle weakness was gone. I was sodium deficient but my labs don't reflect it. Still working on OI and PEM.

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