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Kelynn

How To Eat gluten-free At A Japanese Restaurant?

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We are going to a Hibachi Japanese Restaurant for my boyfriend's sister's birthday next week and I have no idea what to eat. I HATE white rice, but I'm sure the fried rice is not gluten-free with the sauces they use in it. The employees speak very, very limited English. I tried calling once and they didn't even understand my question when I asked about "gluten free eating" at their restaurant. I plan to try again, and hope that there is someone that speaks better English, but I'm just not sure what to do! I don't like sushi, either :blink:

Anyone have any thoughts?

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We are going to a Hibachi Japanese Restaurant for my boyfriend's sister's birthday next week and I have no idea what to eat. I HATE white rice, but I'm sure the fried rice is not gluten-free with the sauces they use in it. The employees speak very, very limited English. I tried calling once and they didn't even understand my question when I asked about "gluten free eating" at their restaurant. I plan to try again, and hope that there is someone that speaks better English, but I'm just not sure what to do! I don't like sushi, either :blink:

Anyone have any thoughts?

The restaurant where I live is not called Hibachi, but it is the same type of restaurant. When we went there they were able to accomodate my daughter. They made her food in the back free of soy sauce, etc. She got to watch everyone else's food prepared and enjoy the expertise of the chef. It was quite entertaining:) They brought her her plate already prepared from the kitchen. The owner's are Japanese, but they did have staff that spoke English and were very familiar with gluten free preparation. I hope you find the same at the restaurant you are going to next time you call. Good Luck!!!

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well...tell the cook no soy sauce or teriyaki sauce on your food...ask for plain fried rice and bring your own sauce to put on it. I've ordered plain fried rice...he gladly kept it separate from the rest. Speak the word allergy and everyone seems to understand. Weird.

however cross-contamination might be an issue.

I love sushi, so that's always my alternative when we do the japanese thing.

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Find out what nationality the people are that work or own the restaurant, then print out free dining cards for them. There will be someone there that can help you. Can you stop by in person to talk to them?

http://www.celiactravel.com/restaurant-cards.html

Thanks for the tip on the restaurant cards! :) :) :)

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The traditional ginger, vegetable based salad dressing is not gluten-free. It contains soy sauce. Miso soup is problematic. The miso in the soup needs to be made with kome koji. That means that the starter culture for the miso should be grown on rice. It can be grown on barley. However, even many Japanese are unaware of the difference or process. Separately, there is miso made with barley as one of the main ingredients but it is uncommon outside Japan.

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We are going to a Hibachi Japanese Restaurant for my boyfriend's sister's birthday next week and I have no idea what to eat. I HATE white rice, but I'm sure the fried rice is not gluten-free with the sauces they use in it. The employees speak very, very limited English. I tried calling once and they didn't even understand my question when I asked about "gluten free eating" at their restaurant. I plan to try again, and hope that there is someone that speaks better English, but I'm just not sure what to do! I don't like sushi, either :blink:

Anyone have any thoughts?

We have a hibachi style restaurant that I love to go to. As long as we sit where they prepare it in front of us they will use my gluten free soy sauce. It makes for a great and delicious experience

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I have decided that I generally don't trust the places (too many various sauces). But, most of them will serve sushi, so I'd go for some simple sushi. If you're not too sure about raw fish, you can always just get a cucumber roll and avocado roll (the simple, one ingredient ones are best if you're not a sushi navigator, 'cause sometimes they'll put wacky stuff in there that'll surprise you). If you're feeling adventurous, you can also get a simple tuna or salmon roll, and have a bit of fish. :)

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I bring my own bottle of gluten-free soy sauce, and stick to nigiri sushi, sashimi or simple maki rolls that don't contain any extra mystery sauces.

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Bring your own cleaning solution and sponge. Before he throws the steaks down on the grill, say excuse me to the strangers sitting around the hibachi, then get up and wipe down one quadrant of the grill. Tell the chef that area is reserved for your steak. Then tell him to grill some veggies for you in the same area. Keep a close eye on the chef and don't let him toss any seasoning or lighter fluid on your quadrant. Enjoy gluten free steak and veggies.

We are going to a Hibachi Japanese Restaurant for my boyfriend's sister's birthday next week and I have no idea what to eat. I HATE white rice, but I'm sure the fried rice is not gluten-free with the sauces they use in it. The employees speak very, very limited English. I tried calling once and they didn't even understand my question when I asked about "gluten free eating" at their restaurant. I plan to try again, and hope that there is someone that speaks better English, but I'm just not sure what to do! I don't like sushi, either :blink:

Anyone have any thoughts?

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This response is obviously to late for the specific dinner you were going to but hopefully it can help you (or someone else) in the future.

There is a Japanese hibachi restaurant by me that I go to fairly often. I bring my own gluten free soy sauce (San-J) and my Triumph Dining Dining cards. At this point they seem to remember me and I don't really need the cards or explanation but I do it anyway. I simply give them the sauce and the card and explain that I am allergic to regular soy sauce and they need to make my food in the back in a clean pan rather then on the grill with everyone else. They are always happy to oblige and I've never gotten sick.

For anyone in the NY / Westchester area the restaurant I go to is Noda's in White Plains.

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