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Lady diver

Mono Diglycerides?

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Hello, this is my first post to this site. I was diagnosed early October after being quite sick for 2 weeks. Can now point to symptoms that can be connected, but not any really bad ones. My numbers on blood test are off the charts and my villi are almost 100 % atrophied. Shock to me, but has been a rough couple months. Really bad symptoms started 5 days after a routine colonoscopy because of anemia.

Anyway, I was told Jiffy peanut butter, was perfectly safe, but 3 times now when I tried it I got sick. The first two I thought it was something else that affected me. But, after it happened a 3rd time I rechecked the info, I found that the reduced fat has the mono diglycerides which shows on the unsafe list, with notes regarding it being only a possible problem. Yes, I can eat nuts just fine, except airplane type, learned hard way......

So, now I need to know, am I just more sensitive to the Mono- dig or was it how they used or manufactured them with the peanut butter. I started checking other items and I see the mono-dig on gluten free products and I am very nervous about trying. I don't want to find out 2 hrs later that my body decides that it is time to empty out the body through both ends and lose a day or night or whatever time of day. It has been horrible and I have lost so much weight that even my old skinny clothes are baggy, ( who knew I could ever complain about that ???)

I don't know what to think about this product, it is even in the crisco that a gluten free biscuit mix said to use so I paid extra for the organic pure type. Anyone have any info? Thanks for any response, I'll check in the AM.

Thanks from Denise in Utah.

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I'm confused about that myself. I thought I saw on some list that it was made of wheat but then when I checked on the Internet, it said it could be made of soy. So I don't know. I just generally try to avoid foods that contain it. Mostly we buy organic foods.

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Welcome to the board!

On the positive side, its really nice for someone to clearly know if they have celiac or not. You obviously do. Not everyone here does--even though they are still adversely affected by gluten.

As far as Jiffy goes, I certainly would pass on that next time. Don't believe everything you read about a product. It could easily have what is called cross contamination (CC) with gluten--maybe from machines that were shared with some glutenous product. or maybe the train boxcar it arrived in at the manufacturer's had rye or wheat in it previously. Bottom line is that if your body doesn't like it -- don't eat it no matter what anyone else says.

Most times with celiac also comes a lot of other food sensitivities due to the villi having been scarred and/or blunted. This blunting then creates leaky gut syndrome. This in turn allows undigested proteins to go into the blood stream. They are then treated like foreign invaders by our immune system which in turn causes a toxic overload in the liver-- which creates this whole reactive body thing to various foods.

Thus especially at first its best to eat a simple whole foods diet free of pre-mixed and pre-prepared foods. Thus no additives etc. is best--and also no sugar since it taxes the system and adds to feeding any yeast or fungal infection you might have.

The blunting of the villi also makes digesting certain vitamins and minerals very difficult. Thus its important to take some vitamin D, B vitamins, E, A, and minerals. Make sure of course they are not (cross) contaminated with gluten.

Eating lots of greens is very healing and inexpensive. Eating root vegetables (potatoes --as well as tomatoes and green peppers--i.e., the nightshade family--however can be suspect), squash and brown rice are easy to digest for most people and very and healing as carbohydrates. Eating meat like chicken and fish are also excellent and easy to digest as proteins. Remember to take the skins off if you have cholesterol problems.

You might want to ease up on the nuts and beans until your body normalizes and then try them one at a time to see how and if they agree with you currently. If you really want nut butter and can't find the right kind(s), you can make your own in a seed grinder with a little oil added to it.

Also its best to have no milk esp. at first except for unsweetened plain yogurt --and some can't handle that either. Milk is one of the hardest things for nearly everyone to digest at first when you initially discover you have celiac. You can always add lactose free, pure powdered stevia as a natural sugar free sweetener (avoid alcohol based extracts due to the gluten in nearly all such alcohols). I personally do better with home made yogurt I have fermented 24 hours to get rid of the hard to digest lactose. I like to use the plain Greek yogurt as the starter. The acidophilus etc. is helpful in healing the intestinal flora, necessary to create a better environment for your injured villi.

As you improve you may be able to handle eating certain cheeses--ones that have been aged at least a year like organic aged cheddar (without the funky orange colorants). I have found again I can have cheese if I want once a week. Others are fine with it every day--and some not at all--things like this vary from person to person and product to product.

Bromelain/papain (from pineapple and papaya) are excellent digestive enzymes helpful in digesting meats and proteins as well as healing of the lining of the intestines. Marshmallow root helps also to reduce and heal inflammation in the intestines (as well as the kidneys).

L-glutamine is great for those times you have inadvertently glutened yourself. It is very healing for the intestines. Avoid however if you have diabetes or kidney disease.

NAC and R-lipoic acid will help speed healing of the intestines too while also hastening your mitochondria to move faster so you end up having more energy.

Good luck! sounds like you are off to a good start.

Bea

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Welcome Lady Diver! In the US FDA regulates that wheat must be disclosed in a product. Jiff would have to reveal if the mono diglycerides were wheat based. It would look like this: mono diglycerides (wheat). I can't do Jiff because of the soybean oil. Didn't know I had a problem with soy too until last August, that was after being a year and a half gluten free and still thinking I was getting glutened or cc from something when it was just another intolerance to soybeans. As Yolo said, you can try a natural peanut butter and see how you do. Again welcome!!

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Welcome to the board!

On the positive side, its really nice for someone to clearly know if they have celiac or not. You obviously do. Not everyone here does--even though they are still adversely affected by gluten.

As far as Jiffy goes, I certainly would pass on that next time. Don't believe everything you read about a product. It could easily have what is called cross contamination (CC) with gluten--maybe from machines that were shared with some glutenous product. or maybe the train boxcar it arrived in at the manufacturer's had rye or wheat in it previously. Bottom line is that if your body doesn't like it -- don't eat it no matter what anyone else says.

Most times with celiac also comes a lot of other food sensitivities due to the villi having been scarred and/or blunted. This blunting then creates leaky gut syndrome. This in turn allows undigested proteins to go into the blood stream. They are then treated like foreign invaders by our immune system which in turn causes a toxic overload in the liver-- which creates this whole reactive body thing to various foods.

Thus especially at first its best to eat a simple whole foods diet free of pre-mixed and pre-prepared foods. Thus no additives etc. is best--and also no sugar since it taxes the system and adds to feeding any yeast or fungal infection you might have.

The blunting of the villi also makes digesting certain vitamins and minerals very difficult. Thus its important to take some vitamin D, B vitamins, E, A, and minerals. Make sure of course they are not (cross) contaminated with gluten.

Eating lots of greens is very healing and inexpensive. Eating root vegetables (potatoes --as well as tomatoes and green peppers--i.e., the nightshade family--however can be suspect), squash and brown rice are easy to digest for most people and very and healing as carbohydrates. Eating meat like chicken and fish are also excellent and easy to digest as proteins. Remember to take the skins off if you have cholesterol problems.

You might want to ease up on the nuts and beans until your body normalizes and then try them one at a time to see how and if they agree with you currently. If you really want nut butter and can't find the right kind(s), you can make your own in a seed grinder with a little oil added to it.

Also its best to have no milk esp. at first except for unsweetened plain yogurt --and some can't handle that either. Milk is one of the hardest things for nearly everyone to digest at first when you initially discover you have celiac. You can always add lactose free, pure powdered stevia as a natural sugar free sweetener (avoid alcohol based extracts due to the gluten in nearly all such alcohols). I personally do better with home made yogurt I have fermented 24 hours to get rid of the hard to digest lactose. I like to use the plain Greek yogurt as the starter. The acidophilus etc. is helpful in healing the intestinal flora, necessary to create a better environment for your injured villi.

As you improve you may be able to handle eating certain cheeses--ones that have been aged at least a year like organic aged cheddar (without the funky orange colorants). I have found again I can have cheese if I want once a week. Others are fine with it every day--and some not at all--things like this vary from person to person and product to product.

Bromelain/papain (from pineapple and papaya) are excellent digestive enzymes helpful in digesting meats and proteins as well as healing of the lining of the intestines. Marshmallow root helps also to reduce and heal inflammation in the intestines (as well as the kidneys).

L-glutamine is great for those times you have inadvertently glutened yourself. It is very healing for the intestines. Avoid however if you have diabetes or kidney disease.

NAC and R-lipoic acid will help speed healing of the intestines too while also hastening your mitochondria to move faster so you end up having more energy.

Good luck! sounds like you are off to a good start.

Bea

Bea, thank you for all your info. I am working on learning more, frustrating when you scour the ingredients, the bag etc and then find out later that something like barley is left out. That happened to me with a ghiridelli chocoalate candy at work, an online note says they started adding barley to their milk chocolate in 2008, except for their choc chips. My husband is insisting that I not touch anything that does not say gluten free, but not everything says that, you have to read the label. I will learn, thank you again. Denise

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Welcome Lady Diver! In the US FDA regulates that wheat must be disclosed in a product. Jiff would have to reveal if the mono diglycerides were wheat based. It would look like this: mono diglycerides (wheat). I can't do Jiff because of the soybean oil. Didn't know I had a problem with soy too until last August, that was after being a year and a half gluten free and still thinking I was getting glutened or cc from something when it was just another intolerance to soybeans. As Yolo said, you can try a natural peanut butter and see how you do. Again welcome!!

Thank you Kathy, that will help. I mentioned in another reply that I don't understand why barley does not have to be listed. I ate 2 ghiridelli milk chocolate thin squares and the next day when I recovered, I read online that they started adding barley in 2008 to their milk chocolate, except for the choco chips. I scoured the bag and ingredients etc, nothing about barley, wheat or anything. That scares me!

Thanks again, Denise

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The gluten free label really doesn't mean much. I've bought stuff that says gluten free only to discover it was made on shared equipment with wheat. Or in the case of Rice Dream, processed with barley.

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The gluten free label really doesn't mean much. I've bought stuff that says gluten free only to discover it was made on shared equipment with wheat. Or in the case of Rice Dream, processed with barley.

I have also tried to watch out for that! I want to say live and learn but what a crummy learning response!!!

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Lady Diver,

I eat Jiff Natural.

Ingredients: Made from Roasted Peanuts, sugar, Contains 2% or less of: Palm oil, salt, molasses.

Tastes really good. I am very sensitive, can't eat most gluten free processed foods. Haven't been glutened yet. Hope this helps.

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Is it possible that you were glutened by someone in your household that "doubled- dipped" in the peanut butter. I learned the hard way too and started buying 2 jars of peanut butter. One for my family and one for me that is clearly marked and labeled with my name and gluten-free all over it with black permanant marker.

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I'm curious what a celiac eats peanut butter on. I haven't had it in 3 years mainly because gluten-free bread sucks so bad I don't usually bother.

I would think it might be better to forgo reduced fat peanut butter and use the regular kind that doesn't contain any di-glicerides. The trade-off doesn't seem to be worth it.

best regards, lm

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I eat it with celery

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In 8 years I've never seen a mono dyglyceride with gluten.

As for what to use peanut butter on other than bread -- celery, apple slices, gluten-free crackers.

richard

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I would put Peanut Butter on Natural Nectar's gluten free cracklebred. Its kind of like having toast....(that's really stretching it - but I can tell myself that). ;)

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the mainstream peanut butters are hit and miss for me. i eat it one time it's fine, another jar and i'm sick. i put it down to the soy now that have had a couple of gluten free, celiac friendly products that gave me symptoms. only common denominator was soy. it seems worse than gluten to me.

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Thank you Kathy, that will help. I mentioned in another reply that I don't understand why barley does not have to be listed. I ate 2 ghiridelli milk chocolate thin squares and the next day when I recovered, I read online that they started adding barley in 2008 to their milk chocolate, except for the choco chips. I scoured the bag and ingredients etc, nothing about barley, wheat or anything. That scares me!

Thanks again, Denise

Kathy,I am just getting back to this site.Istarted looking for the mono-dig with wheat etc. Well,I keep seeing the mono-dig on gluten free foods and no info. So, I think you are on it with the soy. Darn... Bye the way, I went back on a site for the Ghiridelli and they say the barley is on a new bar, but they run it on the same lines. They said that they run two batches that they throw away/ I am just not sure. So, when in doubt, I say don't. That is my new mantra... haha thanks Denise

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