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chumley

Root Beer Or Thai Food?

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Last night was my first eating-out experience since going gluten-free. I had about a glass and a half of Mug brand root beer, Chicken Satay, Massaman Curry, and one bite of Pad Thai and rice pudding. I verified with the server that there was no wheat/flour in the Satay or curry (which usually there isn't) and I'd be really surprised if it was an intentional ingredient in the other two dishes. Any ideas where I went wrong? Right before leaving the restaurant I started having a reaction and was feeling really lousy by the time I got home.

I know Mug Root Beer says their product is gluten-free, but there is a question on anything with caramel color.

I guess my main question is: Has anyone had a reaction with Mug Root Beer, or should I just avoid the Thai place? The only thing on the menu that seemed suspicious was some tempura, so it seems like there would not be a lot of gluten in their kitchen for cross-contamination.

I know this is a lame newbie question, but I am a total newbie at this; thanks for any help! It would be nice to be able to dine out at all since I definitely am going to have to cut down on eating out in general.

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most soy sauce is made with wheat. Did you think to ask about that?

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most soy sauce is made with wheat. Did you think to ask about that?

No, I didn't, thanks for the info!

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You need to ask more questions of the thai place. Chicken Satay usually has a sauce that contains soy sauce. While many thai soy sauces do not contain wheat, it's a huge assumption that a thai restaurant won't use a japanese or chinese soy sauce that is much more readily available. It can also hide in many oyster sauces and some fish sauces. It's far more than just finding out if there is flour in a dish.

For restaurants I don't know, I like to use the Triumph Dining Cards, as they've worked well for me.

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I know Mug Root Beer says their product is gluten-free, but there is a question on anything with caramel color.
Caramel color is one of those celiac urban myths that just won't go away.

Here is Shelley Case's take on it, from Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide:

Although gluten-containing ingredients (barley malt syrup and starch hydrolysates) can be used in the production of caramel color, North American companies use corn as it has a longer shelf life and makes a superior product. European companies use glucose derived from wheat starch, however caramel color is highly processed and contains no gluten.
[Emphasis in original]

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If you didn't check on soy sauce, that's your problem. Caramel color is NOT a problem.

richard

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If you didn't check on soy sauce, that's your problem. Caramel color is NOT a problem.

richard

You really should be nicer about that. Soy sauce isn't something you think of as having wheat. After all, the climate in Thailand isn't conducive to growing wheat.

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You really should be nicer about that. Soy sauce isn't something you think of as having wheat. After all, the climate in Thailand isn't conducive to growing wheat.

Such is the difficulty of text only communication.

I'm pretty sure he meant "If you didn't check the soy sauce, that is the source of your symptoms" rather than "If you didn't check the soy sauce, it's your own fault for feeling crappy".

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You really should be nicer about that. Soy sauce isn't something you think of as having wheat. After all, the climate in Thailand isn't conducive to growing wheat.

Nothing rude meant at all. By "problem" I meant the physical difficulties she was having.

richard

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The Thai restaurant I go to makes gluten-free Pad Thai - they have their own gluten free menu. The server also told me it would be relatively easy to make - just tamarind paste, fish sauce, chicken, rice noodles, eggs, and onions. He told me to stay away from the restaurant's soy sauce though.

I agree with an above poster, carrying a card that explains your dietary limitations is extremely helpful. I use one from Cecilia's marketplace.

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Many Thai restaurants don't use soy sauce; they use fish sauce, which is safe. My local one has soy sauce on the table, but they do not cook with it.

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