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Luvbeingamommy

Was Food Allergy Tested Today....

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I decided to go ahead and do this even though I didn't really think I had any true allergies. I figured it never hurts to check before I started guessing and pulling things out of my diet.

The allergist didn't think we were dealing with true IgE allergies, but maybe delayed IgE allergies or more intolerances. Mostly stomach he said can be true allergies, but often are not. I did have a month not too long ago where I kept getting hives, but it went away.

Anyway, found out that I had a reaction to green peas, peanuts, and soybeans. At first I wanted to cry when I added gluten to that, but then I kind of thought about it and hopefully it won't be too bad. He wants me to remove those from my diet and do it for a month and see if my stomach problems resolve and then I can try to add one one month at a time. He seemed to be hopeful that I might be able to tolerate soy, as it was the least reactive.

I was a little confused, so if you have a reaction, but you don't notice it then it's okay to eat it?? That's what I got from what he said. I believe my soybean was 2+ and peas and peanuts 3+.

Oh and if anyone has had these kind of reactions did you feel better soon after eliminating??

Also it seems to me when you are diagnosed with anything autoimmune it seems common for allergies to show up, I wonder why that is??


Meagan~Happy Mama to my 3 kiddos!

Had a stroke 11-16-09 as a healthy 25 year old, complete workup and found nothing! I *knew* it had to relate with my recent stomach/nausea problems, but was told no for along time. *I* pushed for Celiac testing, even when doctor doubted it.

Positive bloodwork and negative biopsy- 12-09.

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

Neurologist concluded stroke was caused by Celiac/Gluten Sensitivity!

6-10 Tested IgE allergic to peanuts, green peas, and soybeans.

Kingston age 2 1/2 tested positive via Enterolab, tested poitive for IgA and TTG. Doing MUCH better gluten free as of 3-10.

HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

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i have some mild, some moderate, and some severe allergies

during high allergy seasons (think NOW when it's high pollen time) i really avoid foods that i'm allergic to (nuts, seeds, fruits, etc...)

i find that i can tolerate very small portions of some items that i'm allergic to if 1) i have my medication in me, & 2) i do it in a smart way (i might have 2 strawberries but that will be it today for my allergy foods. then tomorrow i might have peanuts. then the next day i'll have pesto made w/ pine nuts - but a VERY SMALL amt.)

remember, everyone is different!

i also always keep a backup supply of benadry (i am allowed to take it in case my everyday pill doesn't do the job) and my epi pen around too.

however, if i wake up and my day starts off as a bad allergy day, i avoid all of it.

good luck and know you have support!


-severe soy, wheat & yeast allergies 2006

-penicillin allergy 2008

-multiple other food & environmental allergies starting 1982

-non-iron deficient anemia - life long

-migraines 3/07

-negative celiac blood testing 10/09 & upper endoscopy biopsy 3/10

-negative GERD observation during upper endoscopy 3/10

-positive hereditary hiatial hernia during upper endoscopy 3/10

+continually working on gluten-free/CF/SF related to allergies & celiac like symptoms

+continually working on elimination of caffine, chocolate, & spicy foods related to hernia & heartburn

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So you take allergy meds year round then?? I do have seasonal allergies and take it on and off during the allergy season.

I forgot to tell the doctor but when I was laying there maybe 5 minutes into it my heart was beating really fast for the second half, but not for a long time or anything. Probably not a big deal though??

So you hear about peanut allergies all the time and how scary they can be. I know mine isn't severe, but when I avoid it and then get it again can't the reaction be worse?? I just worry he didn't say anything about an epipen, but maybe with the severity he didn't think I needed it?? Probably me just worrying too much.


Meagan~Happy Mama to my 3 kiddos!

Had a stroke 11-16-09 as a healthy 25 year old, complete workup and found nothing! I *knew* it had to relate with my recent stomach/nausea problems, but was told no for along time. *I* pushed for Celiac testing, even when doctor doubted it.

Positive bloodwork and negative biopsy- 12-09.

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

Neurologist concluded stroke was caused by Celiac/Gluten Sensitivity!

6-10 Tested IgE allergic to peanuts, green peas, and soybeans.

Kingston age 2 1/2 tested positive via Enterolab, tested poitive for IgA and TTG. Doing MUCH better gluten free as of 3-10.

HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

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Sorry to hear about your allergies, but hopefully this will start to help you feel better!

My GI has prety much noted exactly what you said, in his practice. His celiac and other auto-immune patients seem to be susceptible to food allergies more than his other patients. I asked why and I don't remember his answer, darn it.

I was told I might be able to add things on my allergy list back in, too, after a while. The explanation I was given was that if it's a low level allergy, many people seem to stop being allergic after they have avoided it entirely for a while. Perhaps that is the same with your allergies?

One little bit of info. might be of use to you, that my doc passed on. In animal studies right now, animals fed soy beans that are genetically modified in a large portion of their diet tended to develop allergies to peanuts for some reason. the researchers didn't know why. But my doc said he very much suspected that celiac folk would be more vulnerable to this type of issue than non-auto-immune-issue folk. I tested allergic to soy, too, and my doc advised me that when I try to reintroduce soy some time in the future, I should look at organic products, since the soy in those isn't genetically modified, so I won't run into that issue. Figured I'd pass that on! :-)

I decided to go ahead and do this even though I didn't really think I had any true allergies. I figured it never hurts to check before I started guessing and pulling things out of my diet.

The allergist didn't think we were dealing with true IgE allergies, but maybe delayed IgE allergies or more intolerances. Mostly stomach he said can be true allergies, but often are not. I did have a month not too long ago where I kept getting hives, but it went away.

Anyway, found out that I had a reaction to green peas, peanuts, and soybeans. At first I wanted to cry when I added gluten to that, but then I kind of thought about it and hopefully it won't be too bad. He wants me to remove those from my diet and do it for a month and see if my stomach problems resolve and then I can try to add one one month at a time. He seemed to be hopeful that I might be able to tolerate soy, as it was the least reactive.

I was a little confused, so if you have a reaction, but you don't notice it then it's okay to eat it?? That's what I got from what he said. I believe my soybean was 2+ and peas and peanuts 3+.

Oh and if anyone has had these kind of reactions did you feel better soon after eliminating??

Also it seems to me when you are diagnosed with anything autoimmune it seems common for allergies to show up, I wonder why that is??


T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive

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Also it seems to me when you are diagnosed with anything autoimmune it seems common for allergies to show up, I wonder why that is??

I have read it has to do with the inflammation in your body from the autoimmune, and that the body just starts fighting all kinds of stuff because it is over inflammed. My relatives that went on an allergy exclusion diet, (because of having to go gluten-free) said the doctor said too that once your inflammation is down and controlled, then you can slowly add back in the things that you became allergic to...but you have to slowly test them you can't eat them more than once a week...and it takes like 3 months for them to add things back into their diet.

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I couldn't tolerate milk or soy at first. After a year gluten-free my body settled down and I could eat them again. I don't know of any danger eating non-gluten foods that you can tolerate. You do have to pay attention for a few days, as delayed reactions can show up the day after you eat the food. I've had gluten reactions as late as 36 hours after eating something with wheat by mistake.

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Gluten has been shown to influence the expression of the genes responsible for determining your intestinal permeability meaning that substances that normally can't pass through your intestines potentially could make their way through if enough of the expression is altered. This would mean that your body normally wouldn't be exposed to these larger more reactive chemicals yet with the influence of gluten on your system is now having to react. This is most likely part of the reason why a lot of people with gluten problems end up having many other allergy problems that often go away once their gut heals.


Receiving a qualified diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is as useful as a Psychiatrist giving you a diagnosis of "Doesn't Think Right".

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I couldn't tolerate milk or soy at first. After a year gluten-free my body settled down and I could eat them again. I don't know of any danger eating non-gluten foods that you can tolerate. You do have to pay attention for a few days, as delayed reactions can show up the day after you eat the food. I've had gluten reactions as late as 36 hours after eating something with wheat by mistake.

Yeah that's why my allergist said I can try the foods I have to do it over a month I guess. Not for awhile though, but eventually.

Gluten has been shown to influence the expression of the genes responsible for determining your intestinal permeability meaning that substances that normally can't pass through your intestines potentially could make their way through if enough of the expression is altered. This would mean that your body normally wouldn't be exposed to these larger more reactive chemicals yet with the influence of gluten on your system is now having to react. This is most likely part of the reason why a lot of people with gluten problems end up having many other allergy problems that often go away once their gut heals.

That makes sense. I read though that most don't loose a peanut allergy, but maybe I will be one of the lucky few. If not I guess it's not the end of the world. Although going gluten free cut my candy bar choices down and now even more....not sure even what I could eat without gluten or peanuts. Thanks for the explanation.


Meagan~Happy Mama to my 3 kiddos!

Had a stroke 11-16-09 as a healthy 25 year old, complete workup and found nothing! I *knew* it had to relate with my recent stomach/nausea problems, but was told no for along time. *I* pushed for Celiac testing, even when doctor doubted it.

Positive bloodwork and negative biopsy- 12-09.

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

Neurologist concluded stroke was caused by Celiac/Gluten Sensitivity!

6-10 Tested IgE allergic to peanuts, green peas, and soybeans.

Kingston age 2 1/2 tested positive via Enterolab, tested poitive for IgA and TTG. Doing MUCH better gluten free as of 3-10.

HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

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Gluten has been shown to influence the expression of the genes responsible for determining your intestinal permeability

Could you please provide links to these studies?


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Oh how interesting! I have been wondering about why that is, too, for a while now! Good info. to know.

I have read it has to do with the inflammation in your body from the autoimmune, and that the body just starts fighting all kinds of stuff because it is over inflammed. My relatives that went on an allergy exclusion diet, (because of having to go gluten-free) said the doctor said too that once your inflammation is down and controlled, then you can slowly add back in the things that you became allergic to...but you have to slowly test them you can't eat them more than once a week...and it takes like 3 months for them to add things back into their diet.


T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive

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If you have seasonal allergies you may have what is called cross reaction food allergies. There's also something called oral allergy syndrome. (links below)

I'm allergic to birch and ragweed and have an intolerance to soy. My body misinterprets the soy to be birch pollen. I've also had some reactions to strawberries and other fruits.

cross reaction allergy chart

cross reaction article

birch and soy


40 year old former foodie on a quest to feel better!

-IgE to oats and rye

-Diagnosed with
Colitis
via endoscopy/colonoscopy Oct '10

-Following
FODMAP
diet since June '10, Positve
SIBO
test, July '10

-Diagnosed
non-celiac gluten intolerant
June '10 (celiac in March '10, endocsocopy in Oct '10 shows no signs of celiac)

-
Osteopenia
June '10

-
Gluten free
since July '09 &
Soy free
since December '09

-
Dairy free
since '06

-
IBS & Sjogren's
diagnosed '05

-
RA
diagnosed as a toddler

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