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Kimbalou

Almost Cried At Work!

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Love my crockpot! I use it every weekend to make food for the week. Yesterday got some cheap, marked down meat that turned out fabulous after 8 hours in the crock pot.

Today I think I'll throw in all my leftover veggies, cook them a bit, throw in some leftover soup and maybe a handful of rice and end up with a thicker stew-type meal that works well to take to work for lunches.

I love my crock pot and I use it every weekend to make the tenderest dinners out of inexpensive meats.

Mine is showing a little wear :P I think I need to buy my self a couple new ones ( one large and one small)

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Well all the recipes I read for making things from scratch, include so many different ingredients that we are not able to buy right now, I mean i am hoping eventually to be able to buy a few at a time or something. Things like potato starch, tapioca flour, xanthan gum, etc. All those different ingredients are hard to find here,in a rural part of Iowa. What do you all do? Do you buy those and use them or just forget about making things like pie, desserts, meals, etc. from scratch? Sometimes we buy the betty crocker gluten free desserts, or other gluten free desserts, but those are pretty spendy. We have recently gotten more fruit, and are eating more of that for snacks and such though. I guess I am just kinda stumped on where to start to be able to add more variety, and still stay in a tight budget.

When you first start the gluten free diet, to aid in healing and not to have to wonder what is causing possible reactions, it is best to eat a whole foods diet. That means shopping the outside of the supermarket for meats, veggies, fruits, eggs, and only venture into the middle to get some rice, nuts, gluten free pasta, perhaps a pizza base from the freezer case. The whole foods diet promotes healing, and is the least expensive way to eat, and avoids all those new grains that may be hard to digest at first and cost the earth. You will need some gluten free (perhaps rice or you can use corn) flour for thickening sauces, stews, etc. For special treats to start out with you can buy a box of a gluten free mix for brownies or something like that.

You will find that eating this way is a better way to heal and transition to the diet, rather than frustrating yourself reading every label in the supermarket and getting overwhelmed. As time goes by and you start healing you can slowly add in other things, buy the xanthan gum, find out what flours you like and build your confidence.. The nice thing is that you can do this over time and the cost is absorbed week by week

You can eat things like trail mix, nuts, popcorn, corn chex, maybe corn chips and salsa or homemade guacamole for snacks.

Hope this helps.

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Well all the recipes I read for making things from scratch, include so many different ingredients that we are not able to buy right now, I mean i am hoping eventually to be able to buy a few at a time or something. Things like potato starch, tapioca flour, xanthan gum, etc. All those different ingredients are hard to find here,in a rural part of Iowa. What do you all do? Do you buy those and use them or just forget about making things like pie, desserts, meals, etc. from scratch? Sometimes we buy the betty crocker gluten free desserts, or other gluten free desserts, but those are pretty spendy. We have recently gotten more fruit, and are eating more of that for snacks and such though. I guess I am just kinda stumped on where to start to be able to add more variety, and still stay in a tight budget.

I have made lots of meals without wheat flour before I went gluten-free. Chili, soups, stew, BBQ chicken, various potatoe dishes, Mexican stuff ( use corn tortillas), stir fry ( use the gluten-free tamari soy sauce), salad, etc. You might need that stuff for baking but you don't need dessert e everyday. There are a couple of recipes on here for gluten-free cookies - pb chip and a choc merrange type that use normal ingredients. Look at the websites mentioned above for some ideas. Potato flour is usually in the regular grocery with the regular flour.

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Since went gluten-free, my hub says we have had a lot of really good food. And we have tried a few different things. We have made things we might have gotten at a restaurant. Potato skins are cheaper & healthier at home. We don't use alot of special gluten-free foods except some bread, pasta and pizza crust.

I've had a loaf of gluten-free bread in the freezer for about five months now. I use it to make breadcrumbs for salmon cakes or meat balls, or stuffed mushrooms.

And even though I used to make homemade breads and pies, etc. I'm completely off desserts except for an occasional cobbler or fruit, or a piece of dark chocolate. (The cobblers have been ok, and leftovers are good for breakfast.)

I've bought quite a few flours and the one I am the happiest with is chick pea flour. That might be difficult to find in rural Iowa, but it might be worth it to make a road trip to an Indian store (load up on rice and spices while you're there) or purchasing it on line. It makes an awesome flatbread, tastes good with fritters or onion rings.

I know that your husband appreciates your cooking and it must be so difficult to go gluten-free without actually having an issue yourself. My bff (roommate) is quite pleased with it, because he lost ten pounds without trying.

If you have space for a garden, it might be fun to start looking at seeds to grow your own veggies and try new things. (I'm thinking about all that energy you used to put into baking...)

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I am so glad that I joined this website, you all have been so helpful and uplifting, it is nice to know there are ppl out there who have had the same issues and adventures in going gluten free, yes its been a challenge, but I have also tried things we would never had tried if my hubby had not been diagnosed with this. And I know we will find more and more things, we planted our first garden last summer, and it was wonderful, I plan on doing it again this year, with more variety! It is rewarding to eat our own veggies, fruits! We eat a lot of rice, and are now switching to brown rice instead of white rice, cause its healthier. I will check our Hy-Vee store and see they carry potato flour. We ordered some "all-purpose gluten free flour" from Bob's Red Mill awhile back, but it really taste strange, and not as good as some other gluten free flours I have tasted. What kinds are the best tasting in your opinions?

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I too have this issue with co-workers, I work in a hotel and frequently they have pizza etc. Now in the year I have been Dx the cravings for wheat containing things has not curbed at all, Gluten free stuff is good and all but lets face it it is not the same. I often hear the "I'm sorry" or " I forgot" but it is something we all have to cope with. I would challenge your co-workers to try your diet for a couple days just to see what it is like, I know that mine after a few hours were not at all pleased and had a new understanding of how hard it really is. But I agree with all the other posters that just get your own or make a batch for the office and all can enjoy.

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I too have this issue with co-workers, I work in a hotel and frequently they have pizza etc. Now in the year I have been Dx the cravings for wheat containing things has not curbed at all, Gluten free stuff is good and all but lets face it it is not the same. I often hear the "I'm sorry" or " I forgot" but it is something we all have to cope with. I would challenge your co-workers to try your diet for a couple days just to see what it is like, I know that mine after a few hours were not at all pleased and had a new understanding of how hard it really is. But I agree with all the other posters that just get your own or make a batch for the office and all can enjoy.

My husband also still craves things with wheat, and other gluten. The craving does not dissapear and its been a year for him as well.

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I think it's perfectly understandable to be bothered by watching others eating cupcakes and the like. It makes one feel a bit like an outsider.

I'm very glad this post was made now. I have a meeting to attend on the 27th which will have glutenous food. Now I'll (hopefully remember to) bring my own gluten free treat. I suspect they will have some fruit for the health conscious among us but I'd be leery of cross contamination unless I was first in line.

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I am so glad that I joined this website, you all have been so helpful and uplifting, it is nice to know there are ppl out there who have had the same issues and adventures in going gluten free, yes its been a challenge, but I have also tried things we would never had tried if my hubby had not been diagnosed with this. And I know we will find more and more things, we planted our first garden last summer, and it was wonderful, I plan on doing it again this year, with more variety! It is rewarding to eat our own veggies, fruits! We eat a lot of rice, and are now switching to brown rice instead of white rice, cause its healthier. I will check our Hy-Vee store and see they carry potato flour. We ordered some "all-purpose gluten free flour" from Bob's Red Mill awhile back, but it really taste strange, and not as good as some other gluten free flours I have tasted. What kinds are the best tasting in your opinions?

Most all desserts I make use either Pamela's gluten-free baking mix, gluten-free Bisquick, or the Gluten Free Pantry All purpose flour mix. Sometimes I use the Betty Crocker mixes. So far I've not found anything I couldn't make with those flour mixes. I have no time or storage space for buying 1000 different flours and making my own blend.

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Most all desserts I make use either Pamela's gluten-free baking mix, gluten-free Bisquick, or the Gluten Free Pantry All purpose flour mix. Sometimes I use the Betty Crocker mixes. So far I've not found anything I couldn't make with those flour mixes. I have no time or storage space for buying 1000 different flours and making my own blend.

That's what I do also. I also like Tom Sawyer's gluten free mix for stuff like scalloped potatoes. I am going to make a batch of banana bread today with the Pamela's mix.

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At a previous company, the whole group would gather once a month and have a huge sheet cake for all that month's birthdays. Everyone knew about my celiac and every month I would sing happy birthday and then refuse cake. When my birthday came, I thought for sure they'd remember and get me a gluten-free cupcake or muffin or cookie. Nope. Nada. They offered me a piece, and again I turned it down.

My company used to do the same thing. It never bothered me at all that I couldn't eat the cake for everyone else's birthday because I'm used to that.....really.

However, when my birthday came around, no one made any effort to pick up even a candy bar that was gluten-free. That truly annoyed me until I realized why they probably did not. There is another Celiac at our office and she cheats all the time. She would pick decorations off the cake and eat those because we all know that the frosting is a good buffer between the gluten cake and the gluten-free candy on top, right? :blink: People would offer me things like that because the truly clueless general public doesn't know any better. The depth of their lack of understanding of Celiac and how we have to do things really hit me then so I just do not let it bother me anymore. I am not emotionally attached to food so if I can't eat when others can, what I do instead is smile to myself because all the people stuffing their faces with sugar will commence complaining about their inability to lose weight about 2 hours after the cake party.It just now makes me shake my head and laugh to myself. If I want to eat at a party, I bring my own food but I don't always do that. Sometimes it's fun to watch people get uncomfortable when they realize I have will power and they know they don't. Sometimes people are bothered when I am not eating when they are. Funny how things work sometimes!

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It is interesting the different reactions the same situation.

I am one of those who does not get upset at all... in fact, I encourage people to completely forget about it. It makes me uncomfortable when people focus on what I can not eat.

I have had more people try to accomodate my dietary limitations, and leave me in a quandry for it. They will make "Rice Krispie treats" not realizing that Rice Krispies have malt, and I can't eat them. Or the myriad other foods that sound perfectly fine, but are really not gluten free. Of course, when someone goes out of their way to make something that they thought was safe, they are either disappointed, or worse, angry, that you have to turn it down. That often leaves them hurt or grumbling that you simply can't be pleased (and, maybe, even assuming that you are "making it all up for attention.")

If I were in a wheelchair, I would not be angry that people in my office are walking around me. I look at my gluten-intolerance as an inconvenience, not a major disability, and can not begrudge my co-workers their pleasure in a piece of cake in my presence.

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I agree with Gemini. It is particularly difficult if you have other intolerances too. They may make something that is perfectly, cleanly, gluten free, but it contains tomatoes or potatoes or beans or citrus or corn, and then what do you tell them? Sorry, I can't eat that either :blink: You can't go around with a little sign on our back listing your food intolerances, nor can you constantly recite them to others, so better they just leave you alone and let you eat what you brung :rolleyes:

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It is interesting the different reactions the same situation.

I am one of those who does not get upset at all... in fact, I encourage people to completely forget about it. It makes me uncomfortable when people focus on what I can not eat.

I have had more people try to accomodate my dietary limitations, and leave me in a quandry for it. They will make "Rice Krispie treats" not realizing that Rice Krispies have malt, and I can't eat them. Or the myriad other foods that sound perfectly fine, but are really not gluten free. Of course, when someone goes out of their way to make something that they thought was safe, they are either disappointed, or worse, angry, that you have to turn it down. That often leaves them hurt or grumbling that you simply can't be pleased (and, maybe, even assuming that you are "making it all up for attention.")

If I were in a wheelchair, I would not be angry that people in my office are walking around me. I look at my gluten-intolerance as an inconvenience, not a major disability, and can not begrudge my co-workers their pleasure in a piece of cake in my presence.

This is the post of the day! What an excellent attitude you have! Your last paragraph is beautifully put, although I must admit, I might be a bit angry if I were in a wheelchair.....I really like to hike and walk. That would bother me more than not eating. That is the reason I don't mind Celiac all that much because it isn't a disability but an inconvenience. We have the ability to get our health back when anyone confined to a wheelchair doesn't have that opportunity to walk again, for the most part. It's much more of an effort to live normally when you are truly disabled and I always try to remember that when having a bad day.

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I think it was a little bit of an overreaction, but I understand being sensitive. I personally have no cravings or jealousy towards others who CAN eat "normally" and I think it's because I know how sick it makes me. Of course, pregnancy complicates things (I have been craving things I can't eat but know better than to try) but I still am not mad at others when they eat around me. I just bring my own eats and sit back and relax :).

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This line from aeraen sums it up for me:

I am one of those who does not get upset at all... in fact, I encourage people to completely forget about it. It makes me uncomfortable when people focus on what I can not eat.

For me that is the worst thing, when everyone focuses on it and everyone is quiet and you have to explain what it is. I hate that- especially around coworkers or acquaintances.

I had a bad experience Saturday night- I was out with friends and I ate dinner before I went out. Well, we were hanging at the bar and a few people decided they wanted to eat. they kept asking what I wanted and I kept saying nothing, I already ate- so finally this one guy I know remembered the gluten thing and started making a big deal to the bartender about a gluten-free menu. I was sooo mad, I didn't even want anything. Why are people so pushy sometimes?

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I've posted a few times about how people on our elementary school staff are. The sweet young things eat all the cake, cookies, brownies, chips, pizza they want. I always bring my own snacks and more often than not they make a comment. I can deal with the funny looks and comments as I sit and eat my glutino pretzels or baggie of fruity pebbles, but what I can't deal with is when they blow their breath in my face after eating a brownie and say, "Now, don't you want some?"

Yes, I want the pizza, cookies, cake, all the dairy stuff, gluten stuff they eat, but I know it just isn't worth it. That is what gets me through these times. I think about how sick I will be for the next several hours or days.

I believe the trick is imagery. Imagine you can see yourself feeling ill or being sick. Always, always, always have some safe treats tucked away in your purse or your drawer. I've even had to resort to a candy sucker when I was in an awkward situation on the run. I always keep them in my purse.

So imagine how you will feel if you eat something you shouldn't and have a safe snack. I figure these sweet young things will have their own things to deal with when they reach 61!

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I'd have a hard time not smacking someone who blew their brownie breath in my face. Who raised these people?

I don't care much about the birthday celebrations here. We always get store bought cake with the gross crisco icing I find repulsive. Everyone else enjoys and I just think about nasty trans fat clogging their arteries.

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I am not bothered by people who eat normally either I have T1 Diabetes so eating wheat for me makes it so I cannot eat for 2-4 days after it sucks... a lot... I do mind like most of the posts I have seen when someone has a brownie or a hot piece of pizza coming up to me and offering it to me. I decline and that's when the questions start. Generally, I can buffer them away with the basic I'm allergic to save the 30 mins of explanation that is Celiac's. Don't get me wrong I am tolerant and am willing to explain my disease but not when you have something I REALLY want to eat. I also enjoy the being skinny by default. I do miss the naughty foods but I also like the 30lbs I lost by not eating them it is a double edged sword. But overall coping is tough it gets easier with time as I learned with the diabetes but the urges do not really go away.

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Hi Becca,

I'm sorry you got upset at work. I hope you can find a way to cope with this - having your own treats handy should definitely help.

I decided not long after starting the diet that it's not worth getting upset by what other people eat - gluten free is forever and forever is a long time to be pissed off. Also, I don't want other people to feel uncomfortable around me. The way I see it, most people have stuff they have to put up with and coeliac disease is one of my things. Mind you, my biggest test will be visiting the US later this year for the first time since I started the diet - I'm used to what I can't eat here in the UK but it'll be tough to go into a whole supermarket of new stuff!

I hope things improve for you soon x

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