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MerrillC1977

Malt Flavoring And Caramel Color

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Does anyone know how much gluten would be found in the amount of Malt Flavoring found in a bowl of cereal (most cereals seem to contain this - IMO unnecessary - ingredient)? Like if a slice of bread has X-units of gluten, how many units would that bowl of cereal have, assuming the Malt Flavoring is the *only* gluten ingredient in it?

How about Caramel Coloring.....same question in relation to a bowl of cereal or a can of cola.

Thank you, all!

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Does anyone know how much gluten would be found in the amount of Malt Flavoring found in a bowl of cereal (most cereals seem to contain this - IMO unnecessary - ingredient)? Like if a slice of bread has X-units of gluten, how many units would that bowl of cereal have, assuming the Malt Flavoring is the *only* gluten ingredient in it?

How about Caramel Coloring.....same question in relation to a bowl of cereal or a can of cola.

Thank you, all!

I don't know the answer about the malt but caramel color is gluten free in the US. It is almost always made with corn. If it's made with wheat they would have to declare that on the soda. So go ahead and enjoy a Pepsi, Coke or Dr Pepper if you miss them--all of them are gluten-free in the U.S.

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I notice that footnote 3 on the Unsafe Foods list says:

"The problem with caramel color is it may or may not contain gluten depending on how it is manufactured. In the USA caramel color must conform with the FDA standard of identity from 21CFR CH.1. This statute says: the color additive caramel is the dark-brown liquid or solid material resulting from the carefully controlled heat treatment of the following food-grade carbohydrates: Dextrose (corn sugar), invert sugar, lactose (milk sugar), malt syrup (usually from barley malt), molasses (from cane), starch hydrolysates and fractions thereof (can include wheat), sucrose (cane or beet). Also, acids, alkalis and salts are listed as additives which may be employed to assist the caramelization process."

Can anyone point me to the section of law that says if the Caramel Color came from a gluten source, that the label must say so?

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Can anyone point me to the section of law that says if the Caramel Color came from a gluten source, that the label must say so?

Here is a link to an excellent plain language explanation of FALCPA.

Not all gluten is covered, but wheat is. I think the first paragraph on page three is what you will be interested in. Specifically, it says that the disclosure requirement applies even to ingredients such as colors and flavors that would otherwise be exempt.

Malt flavoring should be assumed to be barley (gluten) unless explicitly declared otherwise.

I've never heard of barley being used to make caramel color. Wheat is sometimes used in Europe--the FALCPA disclosure rule would apply if the food was sold in the US. Caramel color in North America is made from corn.

Here is Shelley Case's take on it, from Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide:

Although gluten-containing ingredients (barley malt syrup and starch hydrolysates) can be used in the production of caramel color, North American companies use corn as it has a longer shelf life and makes a superior product. European companies use glucose derived from wheat starch, however caramel color is highly processed and contains no gluten.
[Emphasis in original]
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Believe us, caramel color is safe in the U.S. You simply do not have to worry about this any longer.

richard

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Here is a link to an excellent plain language explanation of FALCPA.

Not all gluten is covered, but wheat is. I think the first paragraph on page three is what you will be interested in. Specifically, it says that the disclosure requirement applies even to ingredients such as colors and flavors that would otherwise be exempt.

Malt flavoring should be assumed to be barley (gluten) unless explicitly declared otherwise.

I've never heard of barley being used to make caramel color. Wheat is sometimes used in Europe--the FALCPA disclosure rule would apply if the food was sold in the US. Caramel color in North America is made from corn.

Here is Shelley Case's take on it, from Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide:

[Emphasis in original]

So, if I am understanding that document, and what you said here, correctly....it is safe to assume that unless the label says...

  • "Malt Flavoring (Wheat)" in the ingredient list; or
  • "Contains Wheat" under the ingredient list

that there is NO wheat in the product...HOWEVER, the malt COULD have come from barley or some other non-wheat gluten-containing source?

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Believe us, caramel color is safe in the U.S. You simply do not have to worry about this any longer.

richard

Sorry, I'm a "needs proof or back-up" kind of girl. I can't help it. :unsure: I don't mean to be a pain. I just really find it hard to blindly accept things. It's not personal towards any of you at all. Blame it on my upbringing?

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So, if I am understanding that document, and what you said here, correctly....it is safe to assume that unless the label says...

  • "Malt Flavoring (Wheat)" in the ingredient list; or
  • "Contains Wheat" under the ingredient list

that there is NO wheat in the product...HOWEVER, the malt COULD have come from barley or some other non-wheat gluten-containing source?

Malt usually comes from barley, assume that.

Caramel coloring usually comes from corn. If it comes from wheat it will say that. I've never heard of caramel being made from barley (although I suppose it could).

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Malt usually comes from barley, assume that.

Caramel coloring usually comes from corn. If it comes from wheat it will say that. I've never heard of caramel being made from barley (although I suppose it could).

Whoops, sorry. I was mixing up the two concepts. I meant to say:

So, if I am understanding that document, and what you said here, correctly....it is safe to assume that unless the label says...

•"Caramel Color (Wheat)" in the ingredient list; or

•"Contains Wheat" under the ingredient list

that there is NO wheat in the product...HOWEVER, the caramel color COULD have (although unlikely did) come from barley or some other non-wheat gluten-containing source?

And it's really only the Malt Flavoring that we need to worry about, because we know that comes from barley usually but they are not required by law to declare barley as the source on the label (only wheat)?

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Whoops, sorry. I was mixing up the two concepts. I meant to say:

So, if I am understanding that document, and what you said here, correctly....it is safe to assume that unless the label says...

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It's my understanding that malt is used in cereals for retaining crispness. Malt is from barley, therefore has gluten. You shouldn't eat cereals with that ingredient.

In the past Rice Crispies were a no-no for us, but they've come out with a gluten free version. The difference is that malt.

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It's my understanding that malt is used in cereals for retaining crispness. Malt is from barley, therefore has gluten. You shouldn't eat cereals with that ingredient.

In the past Rice Crispies were a no-no for us, but they've come out with a gluten free version. The difference is that malt.

Have you tried the gluten-free rice krispies? I'd love to know what you think of them. The only difference between them and regular (ingredient-wise) is no Malt Flavoring, and they are made with Brown Rice instead of White. I wonder if the Brown Rice makes up for the lack of Malt Flavoring. It also bugs me that they charge *more* for the gluten-free cereal when it has less ingredients and surely must cost them less to manufacture. Grrrrr.

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Have you tried the gluten-free rice krispies? I'd love to know what you think of them. The only difference between them and regular (ingredient-wise) is no Malt Flavoring, and they are made with Brown Rice instead of White. I wonder if the Brown Rice makes up for the lack of Malt Flavoring. It also bugs me that they charge *more* for the gluten-free cereal when it has less ingredients and surely must cost them less to manufacture. Grrrrr.

I have tried the new gluten-free Rice Krispies and I could not tell a difference taste wise. They still make that snap, krackle pop sounds and make great rice krispie treats. I don't like that they are more expensive either but it is probably because they process them in a separate gluten-free facility and test to make sure they are actually gluten-free.

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I have tried the new gluten-free Rice Krispies and I could not tell a difference taste wise. They still make that snap, krackle pop sounds and make great rice krispie treats. I don't like that they are more expensive either but it is probably because they process them in a separate gluten-free facility and test to make sure they are actually gluten-free.

We just picked up a box yesterday....and actually (believe it or not) they were only 1 penny more in cost than the same size box of regular rice krispies! Maybe we just got lucky with our supermarket. I thought they tasted a little less sweet, but that's fine by me. And rather than getting soggy like regular Rice Krispies do in the milk, they got chewy. I liked them for sure. :)

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I just bought a box to make Krispie Treats. Haven't made them yet.

I don't eat much cereal now since I ave a lot of damage and milk will upset my system. From the ingredient lists I've read I think the brown rice keeps it's firm texture better..and may be a bit more nutritious? It's used a lot.

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I tried the new brown rice gluten-free Rice Krispies and found them disappointing. They taste just like the brown rice cereal from Erwhon or any of the other hippie brands that I turned to when first diagnosed. Not exactly like the old RKs in either taste or texture. But they do snap, crackle, and pop. I'll stick to Rice Chex unless I need to make Rice Krispie Treats.

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I didn't care for them, either.

richard

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