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JoyfulGF

Had A Chef Ask Me

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A chef, someone who deals with food...all the time...asked me yesterday if there was a pill I could take so I could have gluten! Dur! Sorry...it just feels like no one knows anything about gluten or Celiac or any of the stuff we go through. I would think, if you're a chef, you would educate yourself on food allergies! This all started because I asked him what was in his Buffalo Chicken soup, which turns out had flour because he made a rue to thicken it. He even went so far to ask me how else he would thicken it. Dur again!

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I truly understand your angst but I'd rather someone ask me questions as opposed to doing their own research. There's so much out there and I had to dig for quite some months before I reconciled the disparity in info available that was actually usable for my specific needs. I recently had to travel for work and loved it when a chef came out to question me himself. I understand the hassle but unfortunately we are the first generation of gluten avoiders in a world that is just learning. I guess it's up to us to help educate those who are willing to learn.

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As long as you didn't get glutened it's all good. It's frustrating when you run across people who don't "get it" but at least this chef is interested in gluten-free and humble enough to ask you. I see that as a good thing! I hope you took the opportunity to educate him and make some recipe suggestions.

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A chef who does not know how to make a roux without wheat flour? Unbelievable. I just do not know how that can be possible. <_< Most good chefs and cooks make superb sauces without nowadays. Or at least they should be able to.

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A chef who does not know how to make a roux without wheat flour? Unbelievable. I just do not know how that can be possible. <_< Most good chefs and cooks make superb sauces without nowadays. Or at least they should be able to.

I would guess "cook" would be a better description.

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I would guess "cook" would be a better description.

Not quite even that - perhaps someone who has been thrown into the kitchen without instruction or the ambition to learn. :P Or just not paying attention in roux class in culinary school...

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My husband actually told me a few days ago that someone is developing some kindof serum that makes gluten intolerant people able to tolerate gluten!

I told him that even if they do come up with such a thing there would be no way on earth I would take it.. because that would mean that I'd have make myself a mutant. My body can't handle gluten, why should I change it just so that I can eat what the world wants to be producing!

I really can't believe that the food industry is so selfish about producing wheat that they want to mutate people :-P

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My husband actually told me a few days ago that someone is developing some kindof serum that makes gluten intolerant people able to tolerate gluten!

I told him that even if they do come up with such a thing there would be no way on earth I would take it.. because that would mean that I'd have make myself a mutant. My body can't handle gluten, why should I change it just so that I can eat what the world wants to be producing!

I really can't believe that the food industry is so selfish about producing wheat that they want to mutate people :-P

He may be talking about the vaccination trials in Australia. The approach is to desensitize people the way you get desensitized to allergies - shots.

It is supposed to be DNA dependent. So of you aren't dq2, it won't work - at least the first vaccine won't. I'm half dq2, half dq8. I have no idea if it would work on a freak like me :).

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My husband actually told me a few days ago that someone is developing some kindof serum that makes gluten intolerant people able to tolerate gluten!

I told him that even if they do come up with such a thing there would be no way on earth I would take it.. because that would mean that I'd have make myself a mutant. My body can't handle gluten, why should I change it just so that I can eat what the world wants to be producing!

I really can't believe that the food industry is so selfish about producing wheat that they want to mutate people :-P

Does being immune to polio and tetanus make you a mutant? It's a vaccine in the works, to teach your immune system to stop freaking out when it sees gluten.

I'd take it in a heartbeat to be able to start making crusty sourdough bread again!

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He may be talking about the vaccination trials in Australia. The approach is to desensitize people the way you get desensitized to allergies - shots.

It is supposed to be DNA dependent. So of you are dq2, it won't work - at least the first vaccine won't. I'm half dq2, half dq8. I have no idea if it would work on a freak like me :).

the freaks are always the interesting ones :-D

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Does being immune to polio and tetanus make you a mutant? It's a vaccine in the works, to teach your immune system to stop freaking out when it sees gluten.

I'd take it in a heartbeat to be able to start making crusty sourdough bread again!

Not even a doughnut would persuade me! :-O

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How does everyone make a roux without wheat flour?

I substitute rice flour for the wheat flour. It works out alright.

But a chef would have to consciously choose to make this substitution. Not sure if rice flour is lying around in kitchens to be commandeered for this purpose.

I am surprised by how many prepackaged soups include wheat flour, even brands that are conscientiousness enough to include a gluten-free label on some kinds. Wouldn't you just substitute the flour in your roux (or whatever other option) so that you could use the gluten-free label on more of your soups? Someday I hope that this at least will change.

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kwylee, you are right, it is better that they ask questions than to not.

Skylark, It is good that I didn't get glutened, I should be grateful for that.

Dani Nero, I wouldn't want it, even if it sounded great. Some of the new medications they come out with scare me just because it's so new, I would still be afraid of what my body would do. Besides, I'm losing weight (which is a good thing) and I'd be afraid of gaining it all back if I started eating wheat again.

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My husband actually told me a few days ago that someone is developing some kindof serum that makes gluten intolerant people able to tolerate gluten!

I heard something about that too. Apparently it is distributed by the Easter Bunny, with out-of-season back-up from the Tooth Fairy. In December, Santa Claus helps out, too.

It is a fantasy.

Stick to the gluten-free diet. It works for me.

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I heard something about that too. Apparently it is distributed by the Easter Bunny, with out-of-season back-up from the Tooth Fairy. In December, Santa Claus helps out, too.

It is a fantasy.

Stick to the gluten-free diet. It works for me.

Passing phase 1 clinical trials is hardly fantasy. I guess you've been hiding in that trash can and not reading the news.

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I think living in a garbage can makes some people a little cynical. Some people might even say grumpy! Then again I am not anxious to try the celiac vaccine. It seems like a good idea to try to make it work, and if they can make the idea work for other autoimmune diseases that would be great. But I'd rather let some other brave soul be the guinea pig for these medical trials they do. Even the first couple of years of an approved drug are basically a large scale trial. And those large scale trials gang oft awry. I did enough experimenting on my body when I was younger. From the looks of him, Oscar did too! :D

Oh, and roux made with any other starch should work. Or psyilium husks will thicken things too. Or corn meal, or lentils or split peas or about anything water soluble you throw in a soup pot besides water will thicken it. Heck I am not a chef but I know that. Right Oscar? Or is it grumpface? G,F for short? :)

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Hahahaha :-D We're all grouch monsters when we happen to stumble upon a good old dose of CC!

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Oh, and roux made with any other starch should work. Or psyilium husks will thicken things too. Or corn meal, or lentils or split peas or about anything water soluble you throw in a soup pot besides water will thicken it. Heck I am not a chef but I know that.

I don't know, the chef's question about the roux made perfect sense to me. I'm from New Orleans where we have made roux based meals long before the cooking channels made them a household word. In fact, one of my first memories is my grandmother teaching me how to make a perfect roux and it's a serious science down here, just the right mixture, color and most importantly, texture to yield the acceptable taste and feel of the final gravy. The quick stuff you see made on the cooking channels is NOT a traditional roux; it's much like a firm paste. Of course I was raised on white flour roux and since eliminating gluten, I haven't found anything to make traditional roux which texture AND flavor is 100% comparable. I can mimic one but not the other.

So in that regard, if I was a chef and really interested in catering to my gluten free customers, I would go to the people who should know best, my celiac patrons. Like I've said. I love it when people ask me questions in hopes of learning more. It makes me feel that we're just a little closer to educating the people who could possibly save us from cross contamination while creating gluten free wonders that EVERYONE would be willing to eat.

By the way, the only thing I haven't tried yet that has been suggested is sweet rice flour, supposedly much closer to the texture of wheat flour roux. I hope that works!!!

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I would give anything for my daughters to be able to eat whatever, whenever, again.

So much planning and preparation have to go in to everything we do. My youngest feels like a freak compared to the little girls who can scarf snacks anytime.

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I don't know, the chef's question about the roux made perfect sense to me. I'm from New Orleans where we have made roux based meals long before the cooking channels made them a household word. In fact, one of my first memories is my grandmother teaching me how to make a perfect roux and it's a serious science down here, just the right mixture, color and most importantly, texture to yield the acceptable taste and feel of the final gravy. The quick stuff you see made on the cooking channels is NOT a traditional roux; it's much like a firm paste. Of course I was raised on white flour roux and since eliminating gluten, I haven't found anything to make traditional roux which texture AND flavor is 100% comparable. I can mimic one but not the other.

So in that regard, if I was a chef and really interested in catering to my gluten free customers, I would go to the people who should know best, my celiac patrons. Like I've said. I love it when people ask me questions in hopes of learning more. It makes me feel that we're just a little closer to educating the people who could possibly save us from cross contamination while creating gluten free wonders that EVERYONE would be willing to eat.

By the way, the only thing I haven't tried yet that has been suggested is sweet rice flour, supposedly much closer to the texture of wheat flour roux. I hope that works!!!

Sweet rice flour is the best I've found for rouxs. I tried sorghum and it just isn't as good at thickening. Sweet rice flour does taste browner than the wheat counterpart of the same color, so beware. I haven't burnt it but you can smell and taste the stronger flavor.

While I understand your perspective on roux (since my family is from LA and rouxs are serious business) any trained CHEF should know the principals of making a roux. I hate to sound like a snob, but it was buffalo chicken soup...hint, hint. Plus, any CHEF would have known cornstarch would have thickened the soup in place of flour.

All said, I ate at one of the best restaurants in Tucson and "The chef" didn't know regular oats are not appropriate for gluten-free diets. And other Celiacs have eaten there and given them great reviews, and they have a gluten-free menu. The food was great, and I don't think I got glutened in spite of an oat dessert showing up on my plate...but just an example.

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Sweet rice flour is the best I've found for rouxs.

While I understand your perspective on roux (since my family is from LA and rouxs are serious business) any trained CHEF should know the principals of making a roux. .

Thanks for the lead and thinking on the sweet rice flour. Now the trick is going to be to find it locally.

Perhaps I'm misreading the previous posts about the chef's question, but I meant that a chef's training on the principals of preparing a roux would certainly include wheat flour in the recipe. As my recent pathetic roux attempts would attest, the principals of making a gluten free roux that isn't grainy or off-flavor are definitely different. For me so far it's been back-to-the-drawing board. And it's just not a good chicken stew without starting with a good roux!!! Believe it or not, I'm from New Orleans, but I do not eat seafood, so no etouffee for me. I think I'm the only one down here who doesn't eat it. I always say I don't eat anything from the sea or the ditch! :)

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Thanks for the lead and thinking on the sweet rice flour. Now the trick is going to be to find it locally.

Perhaps I'm misreading the previous posts about the chef's question, but I meant that a chef's training on the principals of preparing a roux would certainly include wheat flour in the recipe. As my recent pathetic roux attempts would attest, the principals of making a gluten free roux that isn't grainy or off-flavor are definitely different. For me so far it's been back-to-the-drawing board. And it's just not a good chicken stew without starting with a good roux!!! Believe it or not, I'm from New Orleans, but I do not eat seafood, so no etouffee for me. I think I'm the only one down here who doesn't eat it. I always say I don't eat anything from the sea or the ditch! :)

Look at an Asian grocery store for the sweet rice flour.

I have honestly had a very easy time converting my rouxs over to gluten-free flour. I tried KA mix, sorghum, and sweet rice. The latter is definitely the best in taste and texture. I use half butter/half safflower oil. The ratio is generally 1:1; however, I have made it a little thinner and thicker and it seems to trend like wheat roux.

Just watch the color, since it tastes stronger than it looks. I haven't burnt it but I could see it happening quite easily.

I eat from land, sea, and ditch. :).

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I get mine at Whole Foods, now (asked them to carry it).

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