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StephanieL

Dry-How To Overcome

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So I have been experimenting a lot lately for a class I am working on. I like what I am coming out with for the most part but things seem so dry. Any ideas on how I can change that with the limitations of gluten-free, DF, EF and SF?

Thanks

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I've been experimenting myself. It wasn't bad when we still had eggs but pulling the eggs made things difficult.

I have found that using not 1 but 2 egg subs seems to help. I will use a combo of egg replacer and gelatin in most applications. Be sure and let your gelatin bloom. I know they say either/or but I like both.

If you are using rice flour, let it sit for a while so it doesn't get grainy. If you are using coconut flour, let it sit to absorb water and be prepared to add a little more.

For butter in baking, I've been using canned pumpkin. It gives an odd orange color to everything but it keeps a moist texture.

HTH

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I agree with the multiple replacers. Depending on what you are making, try throwing in a well-processed banana, or applesauce, or gelatin, or flax seed, etc.

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Got this from Blender Girl. I'll credit where she got it from when I find it.

"A flax

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I have found that flax goo in bread type applications makes things really gelatinous. I am not a fan. I have also found that rice milk AND rice flour seem to be overload on the rice and I get a gummy texture too.

My pizza dough is pretty good but my shortcakes I made yesterday were really dry (which in this application wasn't too too bad as I just put the strawberry syrup on it early to let it soak in and soften the cake).

I can't do banana (allergy) and again, I am not a fan of the texture applesauce gives things.

I'll look into gelatin. I haven't tried it as an egg replacer. I'll try the two egg replacement thing too!

Thanks

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Most gluten-free flour/blends require more liquid when baking.

An example of gluten-free mix

1

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So I have been experimenting a lot lately for a class I am working on. I like what I am coming out with for the most part but things seem so dry. Any ideas on how I can change that with the limitations of gluten-free, DF, EF and SF?

Thanks

I wonder if you could also increase the oil slightly. I make the egg-free cookies from Elana's Pantry a lot (the chocolate chip cookies are a staple in our house!) and sometimes add an extra tablespoon or so of whatever fat I'm using (coconut oil, shortening, etc.). I started doing this b/c my almond flour gets clumpy and I think that was making me use more flour than the recipe called for, but I could see a little extra fat benefitting an egg-free recipe in general.

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I have found that flax goo in bread type applications makes things really gelatinous. I am not a fan. I have also found that rice milk AND rice flour seem to be overload on the rice and I get a gummy texture too.

My pizza dough is pretty good but my shortcakes I made yesterday were really dry (which in this application wasn't too too bad as I just put the strawberry syrup on it early to let it soak in and soften the cake).

I can't do banana (allergy) and again, I am not a fan of the texture applesauce gives things.

I'll look into gelatin. I haven't tried it as an egg replacer. I'll try the two egg replacement thing too!

Thanks

Ever tried chia seeds? They're used the same way you use flax.

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