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miles2go

Cookbooks

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When I first went gluten-free, I went out and bought Bette Hagman’s “The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread” (which, to tell the truth was a little bit over my head at first, but which I now adore) and Marjorie Hurt Jones’ “The Allergy Self-Help Cookbook” (revised). After that I got Rozanne Gold’s “Cooking 1*2*3” to go with her “Healthy 1*2*3” that I already had. Then came more of Hagman’s “Gluten-Free Gourmet”, “More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet” and “The Gluten-Free Gourmet Cooks Fast and Healthy”. I think it was at that point that I settled down a bit and realized how un-gluteny my entire shelf of Asian cookbooks was and that a lot of the Latin American ones were, too. I’m just starting to be able to read all of my cookbooks with confidence in knowing what to substitute where and how and realize that maybe 2% of the recipes that I’ll never really be able to replicate without a whole day in the kitchen, like those involving filo dough or croissants, but some of these old standbys that I already had helped me back into the “normal” cookbook world:

Andrea Chesman’s “The Roasted Vegetable”

Diane Phillips’ “The Ultimate Rotisserie Cookbook”

Jeffrey Alford & Naomi Duguid’s “Seductions of Rice”

Mark Miller, Stephan Pyles and John Sedlar’s “Tamales”

And the book to trump all books

David Joachim’s “The Food Substitutions Bible”

Now I think that cookbook authors are uber-cool when they include gluten-free recipes for breads and such, like Neelam Batra does in her “1.000 Indian Recipes”.

What are your favorite cookbooks? I’m a fiend! Please help…

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"The Gluten-Free Gourmet Cooks Fast and Healthy" by Bette Hagman, and "The Gluten Free Bible" has some good recipes too!


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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I really like "The Gluten Free Kitchen" by Roben Ryberg. :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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I second the Robin Ryberg "Gluten Free Kitchen" recommendation! I LOVE IT!!! :D

I swear I don't know her, I'm not her agent.....(I keep raving about this cookbook!) :P:P


Melissa in Virginia

Age 35, married, 2 kids, 2 dogs.

No diagnosis. Gluten free since 10/2/06

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I have a huge collection of cookbooks from those wonderful church cook books to specialty cookbooks. My favorite is the Fanny Farmer cookbook. I have just adjusted recipes first when I was diagnosed with diabetis to now when I make things gluten-free. My cookbooks have lots of notations of what has worked and what has not worked. I love cookbooks. I love the old ones especially since they usually include all kinds of household hints that make great reading. I even use the Bisquick cookbooks (the ones you find at the check-out) and just substitue Pancake Baking Mix for the Bisquick.... with some slight adjustments to the amount of pancake mix. My family is mostly very supportive of my gluten-free lifestyle. My kids even look forward to the unusual spaghetti that I use. I think they like the fact that most things are made from scratch.... I have even learned that it really doesn't take that much longer to cook from scratch. I have several gluten-free cookbooks that I like to use but my old FAnny Farmer cookbook remains my very favorite!!!!


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My kids even look forward to the unusual spaghetti that I use. I think they like the fact that most things are made from scratch

Sparkles, do you make your own pasta from scratch and if so do you have the recipe that you could share or where I could get it. I love pasta and the gluten-free is expensive. Thanks Beth.

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I am on a gluten-free cookbook buying jag, got two on Saturday and have three on order. My first one was Special Diet Solutions by Carol Fensterm Ph.D., it is all tattered by now with writing all over the pages where I have made adjustments etc.

I have Roberts, Gluten free baking Classics, hagman-Gluten Free gourmet makes dessert, Sarros - Reduced Calorie cookbook - wheat free gluten free, Healthy Cooking gluten free cookbook by Paul Morgan, Gluten free and dairy free cookbook by nicola graimes

my favorite regular new cookbook is Salmon by Diane Morgan, actually most of the recipes are gluten-free, with it looks like a token few with gluten

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125 Best Gluten Free Recipes by Donna Washburn and Heather Butt. I'm only recommending this book as everyone went nuts over the pumpernickel bread a support member brought to our Thanksgiving Feast this past Sat., my DH included. He took home the left over bread and made a sandwich for lunch today. He ate it without heating and loves it. I don't really like pumpernickel but this was one of the best gluten free breads I've had to date.


Dx'd with anemia - March 2005

Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005

Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006

Gluten free since 1-23-06

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I love the 125 Gluten Free Recipes book mentioned above and use it frequently. Right now, I'm baking the white sandwich bread recipe in my new programmable bread machine. Fingers crossed as this is a first attempt. The recipe that came with the gluten free breadmaker was the worst! I'll try that pumpernickle recipe if I gain any confidence in this breadmaker hehe.

I highly recommend this pasta recipe from Bette Hagmans The Gluten Free Gourmet!

1/2 C tapioca flour

2 Tbls potato starch flour

1/3 C cornstarch

1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbls xanthan gum

2 lg eggs

1 Tbls oil (i used olive)

Combine flours, salt, and Xanthan gum. Beat eggs lightly and add oil. Pour egg mixture and stir. Will feel like pastry dough. Work together into a firm ball. Knead a min or two.

Place ball on a cornstarch dusted bread board and roll as thin as possible. Slice noodles as thin as possible, or wide for lasagna. cook now or freeze for later.

Cook in salted boiling water with a tbls of oil, for 10 - 20 min depending on the size you cut the dough

I used this recipe twice so far..once in my pasta machine(manual) and once rolled by hand and it was amazingly good. I used the thin sheets as noodles and also to make cheese stuffed ravioli. I can't tell you how GREAT it was to have hot noodles again. OMG I can't tell you how great they were with pesto.

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Thank you so much for the pasta recipe. I love pasta and that was one thing I missed at first. The pasta you buy in the stores is expensive. I'm trying to get hubby and one son still at home to go gluten free. Both my sons liked the bread and baking I did on the weekend so that's a good start. Hhhmmmm maybe I'll invest in a pasta machime if they aren't to expensive or a good Xmas idea. Thanks again. Beth.

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Unless the kids come over, it is just the hubby and me and NO, I do not make my own pasta. Too much work for the two of us. I make most everything else from scratch but not the pasta. If I was still feeding a large family that might be different but since it is just the two of us, I buy the pasta. For a quick meal, I use the Thai Kitchen pasta dishes. They come in individual servings.... much like the Roamane (spelling is way off) Noodles that you can buy for 25 cents. I like the Spring Onion the best and it is less than a dollar. It is also gluten-free marked right on the package. If I am not having company, I use those noodles for the two of us. One package for him and one for me and enough left over for lunch. I also use those noodles to make individual servings (like for lunch) of pasta, veggies and leftover meat or tuna and cheese casserole. It is usually enough for two servings.


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The pasta machine isnt really neccesary. I did much better with a nice nonstick roller and cornstarch dusted marble surface. You can buy these ravioli molds (mine was marked down to 50 cents) and just roll out the dough, put one layer on the mold, trim the sides, depress the pockets in the mold as you put spoonfulls of stuffing. (I also just made a nice mushroom stuffing that turned out so good) Then roll out a top layer of dough and press it down. I used egg wash between the layers. They sell a tool to crinkle cut the edges of the little pillows of ravioli too. Another way is just to cut squares using a knife on rolled out dough and turn them over into little triangles with stuffing in the middle. You wont be disappointed so just use what you have and enjoy. These days I'm more interested in the product and not the spiffy tools :)

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Oh would one of you who as the 125 best gluten-free recipes cookbook please post the pumpernickel bread recipe in it? My hubby just loves it and he can eat gluten. I don't want to buy a book for one recipe. My Celiac Mother also like pumpernickel so she asked me for the recipe but they ran out Sat. at the dinner and I had no idea my hubby would be so in love with - even untoasted. Thanks if anyone can help!


Dx'd with anemia - March 2005

Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005

Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006

Gluten free since 1-23-06

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The pasta machine isnt really neccesary. I did much better with a nice nonstick roller and cornstarch dusted marble surface. You can buy these ravioli molds (mine was marked down to 50 cents) and just roll out the dough, put one layer on the mold, trim the sides, depress the pockets in the mold as you put spoonfulls of stuffing. (I also just made a nice mushroom stuffing that turned out so good) Then roll out a top layer of dough and press it down. I used egg wash between the layers. They sell a tool to crinkle cut the edges of the little pillows of ravioli too. Another way is just to cut squares using a knife on rolled out dough and turn them over into little triangles with stuffing in the middle. You wont be disappointed so just use what you have and enjoy. These days I'm more interested in the product and not the spiffy tools :)

You make me so hungry. Too bad your mother doesn't have a little of your ambition. But then maybe I did too when I was younger.

The pasta machine isnt really neccesary. I did much better with a nice nonstick roller and cornstarch dusted marble surface. You can buy these ravioli molds (mine was marked down to 50 cents) and just roll out the dough, put one layer on the mold, trim the sides, depress the pockets in the mold as you put spoonfulls of stuffing. (I also just made a nice mushroom stuffing that turned out so good) Then roll out a top layer of dough and press it down. I used egg wash between the layers. They sell a tool to crinkle cut the edges of the little pillows of ravioli too. Another way is just to cut squares using a knife on rolled out dough and turn them over into little triangles with stuffing in the middle. You wont be disappointed so just use what you have and enjoy. These days I'm more interested in the product and not the spiffy tools :)

You make me so hungry. Too bad your mother doesn't have a little of your ambition. But then maybe I did too when I was younger.

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;) Haha, I think that Tudorhen is my mom! I promise, I'll bring some noodles for dinner one of these days.

Pumpernickle loaf, from 125 Best Gluten-Free Recipes, Washburn & Butt

1C whole bean flour

1C yellow pea flour *see variation at end of post

2/3C potato starch

1/3C tapioca starch

3 Tbl brown sugar (packed)

2 1/2tsp xanthan gum

1 Tbl bread machine or instant yeast

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbl instant coffee granules

1 Tbl unsweetened cocoa powder

1/2 tsp ground ginger

1 1/2 C water

3 Tbl fancy molassas

1 tsp cider vinegar

2 Tbl vegetable oil

3 eggs

In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients, mix well and set aside.

In bread machine, pour the water, molassas, vinegar and oil. Add eggs.

Select rapid 2 hr basic cycle. Allow liquids to mix till combined, then add dry ingredients gradually, scraping the sides with a rubber spatula. Try to incorporate all the dry ingredients within 1 to 2 minutes. When the mixing and kneading are complete, remove the paddle from the bread pan so it bakes without a huge hole in the bread :)

* Use Chickpea or garbonzo flour if pea flour isnt available.

For milder flavor omit the coffee and cocoa

If not using a bread machine,

Use a high power mixer on lowest speed for 4 minutes when adding the liquid ingredients to the dry.

Spoon mixture into a prepared pan and let rise in a warm draftfree place for 60-75 minutes. Preheat oven to 350, Bake for 35 to 45 min until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.

Making me hungry ...think I'll try this next :)

Janet

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I recommend searching for recipes online. It's free and most are very good. I like CookingLight.com's recipe archive. Almost all recipes on there can be modified to be gluten-free if they aren't already... and 99% of everything I've tried from them is amazing. I find that recipes that are formulated to be gluten-free usually aren't as good as "normal" recipes that you can modify.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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First - thank you Dangerkitten! My Celiac Mother I found out also wants to try this bread. It's interesting you note about the pea flour because the lady who made this bread for our function told me she didn't have one of the flours and it didn't matter - it still tasted great and is good without being heated! This is no joke people.

emcmaster - thanks for listing that recipe site. I use epicurious.com and recipezaar.com but for this bread, I had to have the exact thing my husband ate Sat. Now I'm going to look for some new things to try from cookinglight.com. I agree about using reg. recipes and tweaking them to be gluten-free. They almost always turn out just as good as the gluten dishes.


Dx'd with anemia - March 2005

Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005

Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006

Gluten free since 1-23-06

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