Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ladybugpumpkin

gluten-free Bread

Recommended Posts

Ok...so I'm going to go on a little rant here. I have tried SEVERAL gluten-free bread mixes, INCLUDING the highly proclaimed "Pam's Amazing Wheat free bread" mix. NONE OF THEM BAKE CORRECTLY!!!!! I follow all the directions and have tried them in bread pans in the oven as well as the expensive-ass bread maker I just bought. Every freaking time I try it, all I get is a shriveled up lump of bread! I bake the bread, then wait for it to cool before slicing. Every time the bread sucks in on itself so there really is no point in slicing it because its a big mess! As if you can't tell, it's really starting to piss me off. I can't afford to keep buying this poop to throw it in the trash can. Does anybody have any idea how to bake the gluten-free bread mixes and have it come out looking like a damn loaf of bread that is slice-able?


*AMB*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


You poor thing! You sound really frustrated.

I use The Gluten Free Pantry French Bread mix. I just mix it up in the Kitchenaid for 2 minutes, spread it in a loaf pan, let rise for 40 minutes and bake.

I've never had a problem with it. Ever.

I'm sorry, I've not used a bread maker for gluten-free bread, so I have no suggestions there :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok...so I'm going to go on a little rant here. I have tried SEVERAL gluten-free bread mixes, INCLUDING the highly proclaimed "Pam's Amazing Wheat free bread" mix. NONE OF THEM BAKE CORRECTLY!!!!! I follow all the directions and have tried them in bread pans in the oven as well as the expensive-ass bread maker I just bought. Every freaking time I try it, all I get is a shriveled up lump of bread! I bake the bread, then wait for it to cool before slicing. Every time the bread sucks in on itself so there really is no point in slicing it because its a big mess! As if you can't tell, it's really starting to piss me off. I can't afford to keep buying this poop to throw it in the trash can. Does anybody have any idea how to bake the gluten-free bread mixes and have it come out looking like a damn loaf of bread that is slice-able?

I am so sorry you are having such a hard time with your bread. I have made other things that flop and its no fun at all! Especially when one is "hungry"! I use Bob's Red Mill gluten free bread mix with a Kitchen Aide Mixer. I have made the bread both in the oven in pans and in my Zojoushi bread machine. It works well both ways. It comes out tall, done in the middle and acts like real bread for sandwhiches. I did have some loaves sink in when I was first baking because my oven was too hot and the outside cooked before the inside. I think if it sinks it means the inside isn't quite done. I have never had that problem in the bread machine, however and get great bread with it. The loaves come out just perfect every time! Maybe your bake time or temp needs to be adjusted on the bread machine?

Don't give up! Every affliction can be an exercise in perseverence that can make one stronger. Someday, after you are making great nice and fluffy gluten free bread someone will come into your life that needs your encouraging words on "how in the world do we make great gluten free bread?" Do you have a thermometer for your oven to see how close it is to where you have set it? That's something to ck. You can also put a piece of foil paper on the top of the loaf in your oven after its browned to make sure the inside gets done without burning the outside. And, it might be worth it to ck your settings on your bread machine. I hope this helps! If you lived close I would have you come over and we could make bread together! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty frustrated, too. I make bread that looks like bread and cuts like bread, but the taste and texture just aren't that great. I saw the link to gluten-free bread recipes. I'm new to gluten-free baking and I've resisted buying any more than the necessary few flours. But it seems that to get a good, artisan-caliber loaf you have to use the teff, amaranth and quinoa kinds of flours. Is that the secret to a good loaf of bread?


DD: gluten-free/casein-free, soy lite, corn lite

Me: Vegan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Anna's mix all the time. On her website she states alot of hints , one is if the bread sinks reduce the water by 3 tbsp. Now this is for her mixes but I would think it would be helpful for any bread mix.

I have the zojurushi machine & love it. I bake her bread mix on the quick wheat bread setting. 2 hrs.8min.I alway cool it down & then refrigerate until cold then I cut it...

I think it's easy to get overwelmed when trying to start over, learning how to bake & cook. It will fall into place & soon you will be coaching others.....

blessings

mamaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks everyone! i have "calmed" down a little. i guess patience really is a virtue. i'm gonna give it a try again. i just want a piece of bread....is that too much for a girl to ask!!! ha ha ha


*AMB*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they rise too fast (too big of air bubbles that can't be supported by the bread when the gas escapes, especially in weaker gluten-free bread); remedied by having it rise in a cooler area (yeast bread specific)

if it's during baking, the temperature was too low, so the bread couldn't set before the gas all escaped

it may have had too much liquid, and it too heavy to support itself (a very common problem with gluten-free breads)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I had problems with the pamela's bread mix too, and then I decided to mix very warm water with a tablespoon or so of honey, and add the yeast to that and let it sit for a few minutes until it is foamy-looking. Then I mix everything up in the mixer and stick it in a loaf pan and it bakes up MUCH nicer.

I don't have a bread machine, and I've never used one, so I'm not sure if this will help you or not, but it might be worth a try! :)


~ Jenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's awful. I'm sorry you're having so many problems.

In my gluten-eating days, I used to really try to bake bread. My grandmother used to bake all their bread by hand up until she was in her 70's. I always loved it, so every once in a while I just wanted some homemade bread. 90% of the time I spent 5 hours to end up with unrisen hockey pucks.

The first thing my dad told me to check was the temperature of the water (or milk) I was using. He said that most of the time the water isn't hot enough. In most directions it says to use warm water, but yeast needs water that is between 110-120 degrees F in order for the yeast to become active. Once I started using a thermometer to check the temperature, I started getting much better results. Also, for me, 110 is actually pretty hot. Not the "warm water" that is asked for in the recipes. So now I use a thermometer every time.

You also need to make sure the water isn't too hot. Too hot water kills the yeast and keeps it from rising too.

Also, bring your eggs to room temperature a bit. Leave them out on the counter for a half hour / hour before using them. Especially if you're combining the water and eggs together in the bread machine instructions. The cold eggs will bring down the temperature of the water if you use them right out of the refrigerator.

Nancy


The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.

~Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest nini

I haven't had a problem with Pamela's bread mix in my bread maker, EXCEPT for when my husband and daughter are in the kitchen making lots of noise. Yeast breads like a quiet area to rise in and when children or family members are being loud around the bread it flops. The other thing is my bread machine has a setting for a "rapid" loaf which means it only kneads it once (gluten-free breads do not need to be kneaded twice) and I adjust the crust setting to either medium or dark (this ensures the loaf is cooked through on the inside). I also scrape the sides of the bread pan as it's mixing in the initial mixing stage to ensure that everything is incorporated properly.

I'm sorry you are having such bad luck with it, I wish you much luck because the Pamela's bread is really delicious when done correctly. I love it hot with butter and honey on it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In regard to the temp of the milk or water:

On the Bob's Red Mill Bread Mix package it says to warm the milk and then put the yeast into it when baking in the oven. When I use my bread machine the first thing it does after I have put in my liquid, then dry ingredients including the yeast is heat up the machine. I do think the temp for the yeast is very important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a long time since I used my bread machine, but I remember I finally found success when I changed the type of yeast, but I can't remember which one was the one that worked! But I definitely know the key to success was the yeast...... I don't mean the brand, I mean the type (slow-rising vs. fast-rising. I am not sure, but maybe it was the yeast specifically made for bread machines that I found success with?) I absolutely remember being totally frustrated also!


Karen

positive bloodwork, positive biopsy

Celiac, collagenous colitis, hypothyroidism

endometriosis (at age 20)

spinal stenosis (early 20's)

Biopsy August 2006 confirmed complete villous atrophy despite being gluten-free for years and bloodwork within range showing compliance with diet. Doctor has confirmed diagnosis of Refractory Celiac Sprue.

Endoscopy also showed numerous stomach ulcers, have started taking Losec.

Mother to Eileen 13 yrs

Rhiannon 8 yrs

Daniel & Connor 6 yr twin boys......

"Joyfulness keeps the heart and face young. A good laugh makes us better friends with ourselves and everybody around us."

Orison Swett Marden

Laughter is the shortest distance between two people.

-- Victor Borge

"An optimist laughs to forget. A pessimist forgets to laugh."

Tom Nansbury

"Doctor to patient: I have good news and bad news. The good news is that you are not a hypochondriac."

Unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My take? gluten-free bread just pretty much sucks. Generally, I don't bother with it (except cornbread). I've made bread about 5 times in five years.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's been a long time since I used my bread machine, but I remember I finally found success when I changed the type of yeast, but I can't remember which one was the one that worked! But I definitely know the key to success was the yeast...... I don't mean the brand, I mean the type (slow-rising vs. fast-rising. I am not sure, but maybe it was the yeast specifically made for bread machines that I found success with?) I absolutely remember being totally frustrated also!

We have been making gluten free bread for years and in the beginning it was very frustrating. Once companies began making mixes and bread machine settings were geared for gluten free baking things changed. We have several of our family members that eat gluten free and they love the bread we make. We usually use Bob's Red Mill, although there are others that work great as well. The yeast comes in the mix so is geared for the gluten free bread baking. Since using their mix I have not had any problems getting a nice, fluffy loaf of bread that works great for sandwhiches. I also make buns, hamb and hot dog and great cinnamon rolls! All from the mix. I think when one realizes they have to eat gluten free the mind set of what a loaf of bread looks and tastes like has to adjust a little. In the early days it was exciting just to have a piece of bread that didn't fall to pieces when you picked it up. :) Gluten free bread "really has" "come a long way, baby" :) There are characteristics to keep in mind, like its always better the day its made. Freezing helps keep it fresher longer, baking long enough for the middle to get done etc. and etc. I learn things all the time. With my last hamburger bun batch (that I freeze) I brushed the tops with egg whites. They turned out so soft and nice our son (18) thought they were great! He likes them thinner so I use just a little dough in a large round cookie ring (about 3/4" tall) but could fill it to make taller and thicker ones. The same wiht hot dog buns.

The cinnamon rolls are great too from the mix. I just put a piece of waxed paper on my counter and spray it with cooking spray. Then I roll it out into a rectangle shape using a pastry roller that has been sprayed. I brush it with butter or oil, then sprinkle cinnamon over it, a couple of handfuls of raisins and drizzle honey over it all leaving a little open spaces on the edges. I then take a rubber spatula dipped in hot water and as I lift the wax paper on one side I slowly push the dough with the spatual to roll it like a log. If the spatula begins to stick I dip it again in the warm water. When I get to about 4 inches from the other side I do the same thing to the other side bringing the right side over the left so it looks like a log. I then take a metal flipper and cut it through to the size of one jumbo roll and scoop it up and put it into a greesed jumbo muffin tin cup. I let them rise till they are jumbo and bake at 375 till they are brown. I then take powdered sugar and mix it with a little rice milk and a squirt of vanilla till thick. I then put some on each warm roll. Oh boy, you should see them disappear by all in our house, including those that don't have to eat gluten free! Maybe eating some cinnamon rolls would help take the disappointment off of the bread troubles! Would love to have everyone to my house for cinnamon rolls, coffee or tea if we were all in one place! Might put a smile on the faces of frustrated bread bakers! Well, we could virtually have some! What will the modern day computer world think of next?! Hey, we could have web cam cooking! What an idea! Its probably already been done somewhere! Hope this helps! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Anna's mix all the time. On her website she states alot of hints , one is if the bread sinks reduce the water by 3 tbsp. Now this is for her mixes but I would think it would be helpful for any bread mix.

I have the zojurushi machine & love it. I bake her bread mix on the quick wheat bread setting. 2 hrs.8min.I alway cool it down & then refrigerate until cold then I cut it...

I think it's easy to get overwelmed when trying to start over, learning how to bake & cook. It will fall into place & soon you will be coaching others.....

blessings

mamaw


BabySnooks

Diagnosed with celiac disease July 8, 2005 by endoscopy and colonoscopy.

Rediagnosed with Celiac Sprue August, 2006 with positive duodenal and small bowel biopsies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Anna's. I've tried others and they either don't bake right or taste awful. I pour Anna's in my very old bread maker and in 4 hours its done perfectly every time.

Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites