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JennyC

Celiac & Lactose Intolerance

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My son was just diagnosed with Celiac disease via full panel blood work up. I had previously suspected that he had a milk allergy (Celiac symptoms?), but it turns out that he has no other allergies. I read that many people with Celiac disease are also lactose intolerant. How do I know if my son is lactose intolerant? :huh: I want to be sure that I remove all irritants.


Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.

Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

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If your son's blood work was positive for celiac disease, his villi will be quite damaged at this point. The tips of the villi are supposed to produce lactase, the enzyme that helps us digest dairy. If there are no villi tips, you will have a lactose intolerance as a result.

That is why all people diagnosed with celiac disease should eliminate dairy for at least six months, giving the villi a chance to regenerate, before trying dairy again.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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If your son's blood work was positive for celiac disease, his villi will be quite damaged at this point. The tips of the villi are supposed to produce lactase, the enzyme that helps us digest dairy. If there are no villi tips, you will have a lactose intolerance as a result.

That is why all people diagnosed with celiac disease should eliminate dairy for at least six months, giving the villi a chance to regenerate, before trying dairy again.

Thanks! There is so much to learn!!! I am very grateful for this great resource and all of the people who participate in this message board.


Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.

Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

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So its possible to recover from a dairy lactose problem ? Is it the same for dairy casein or is that life long like Celiac ?


Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.

Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.

Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.

Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.

Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.

News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !

Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

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So its possible to recover from a dairy lactose problem ? Is it the same for dairy casein or is that life long like Celiac ?

Casein and whey are milk proteins that cause an allergic reaction if you are allergic to them. It is similar to other allergies, but if it's a food allergy your body tries to rid itself of the allergen by vomiting or diarrhea. Lactose intolerance exists when you lack the lactase enzyme, so your body cannot digest lactose, causing discomfort. Two different problems. If you are lactose intolerant then you must avoid classic dairy foods. If you are allergic to milk proteins, then your diet restrictions must be much more broad, similar to gluten!


Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.

Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

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Some Celiacs are "temporarily" (short term) lactose intolerance, until they heal. After this, they can re-introduce dairy and generally do well with it. Some can't handle dairy very well after being glutened.

Others are lactose intolerant permanently, just like there are people with LI who aren't Celiac.

Some people never have any problems at all.

Keeping a detailed food journal, along with the type of day/symptoms, can help.

Laura

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I am currently on a self-imposed 2 week dairy free diet to try to figure out if I am dairy-intolerant. I was diagnosed with Celiac last June, and have found some but not complete improvement as a result of going gluten-free. The last post discussed a difference between simply not tolerating dairy, and having an intolerance to casein. Can anyone recommend how best to figure this out? I wish I had heard the recommendation to go dairy free at the same time I went gluten free - then I might not be going through this now. Thanks!

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I would also like to inquire if casein or lactose will cause damage to the intestines similar to gluten, or just cause discomfort and symptoms.

I know that this has most likely been answered several times. <_<


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Lisa:

I don't think that lactose causes damage (to my knowledge), just discomfort/symptoms when we don't have enough lactase.

Casein, I think I've heard that it hypothetically can, in some people. I don't think they know enough yet.

Laura

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Lisa:

I don't think that lactose causes damage (to my knowledge), just discomfort/symptoms when we don't have enough lactase.

Casein, I think I've heard that it hypothetically can, in some people. I don't think they know enough yet.

Laura

Thanks Laura,

? What is the difference between lactose and lactase?


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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I am currently on a self-imposed 2 week dairy free diet to try to figure out if I am dairy-intolerant. I was diagnosed with Celiac last June, and have found some but not complete improvement as a result of going gluten-free.

I have just completed this. And I can say it made a huge difference to me. I lost some excess weight and also had lots more energy. Then I ate a chocolate Easter Bunny. I had no symptoms that day( unlike Gluten) so assumed I was OK. Two days later I was hit with this crippling bowel pain, and fatigue and that lasted for 2 days. It looks like I am dairy intolerant ! But is it lactose or casein ? And will it be forever? The symptoms were different to a Glutening - but not nice.

I have been told that later I may be able to have small amounts of goats milk cheese. But it looks like I need to be dairy free at the moment.


Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.

Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.

Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.

Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.

Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.

News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !

Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

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If your son's blood work was positive for celiac disease, his villi will be quite damaged at this point. The tips of the villi are supposed to produce lactase, the enzyme that helps us digest dairy. If there are no villi tips, you will have a lactose intolerance as a result.

That is why all people diagnosed with celiac disease should eliminate dairy for at least six months, giving the villi a chance to regenerate, before trying dairy again.

Ursa,

You are a wealth of information! I didn't know that about the villi. When I had my endoscopy the pictures they took and the biopsy showed NO villi present. Completely damaged. No one said anything about the dairy and I eat cheese on a daily basis. Maybe that's why the D not improving. Maybe I should cut out the dairy for awhile. I'm gluten-free for 2months, should I wait and then try dairy free, what is your opinion? My dr. doesn't give me much in the way of answers.

thanks for any help

mp

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Some ways that dairy can be an issue:

  1. Temporary Lactose Intolerance - from villi damage, as the tips of the villi produce lactase (the enzyme produced by the human body) to break down lactose (the complex milk sugar); when the villi regrow, the ability to produce lactase reappears as well
  2. Genetic Lactose Intolerance - inherited, genetic lactose intolerance, and quite common in the world (causasians are the exception to the rule, really), where the body, after three or four years of age, slowly starts naturally producing less and less lactase; even caucausians find that, as they get into old age, they cannot tolerate as much milk, and their stomachs digest less lactose themselves, leaving more to be passed on to the intestines, where bacteria in the intestines break down the sugar, releasing gas as a metabolic by-product (and producing gas, bloating, and pressure-induced pain as sympotoms)
  3. Dairy Allergy - this is an allergy to the dairy proteins, usually casein (not as often whey) and usually primarily one of the subtypes of casein, which causes a standard IgE mediated allergic response, including possible rashes, itchiness, and - in very severe cases - anaphylaxis
  4. Casein Intolerance - an IgG mediated immune response, less well understood than the allergy, to the casein protein, that causes digestive complaints, very (very) rarely intestinal damage, and questionably systemic issues in people who are sensitive to it


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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Georgie, to test whether you're casein or lactose intolerant, take some lactaid, then drink some milk. If you're casein intolerant, it will make you ill ... if it's lactose, it won't. It won't be comfortable if you react, but at least you'll know whether you can take a lactaid next time you crave a chocolate bar! :P

I have heard that casein intolerance is permanent, but lactose intolerance can be temporary if it's due to the celiac damage.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Thanks Laura,

? What is the difference between lactose and lactase?

Lactose is the stuff in dairy that some people's bodies can't fully process/break down.

Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the lactose. Hence, lactaid. Lactaid isn't medicine, but lactase supplements.

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Thanks Laura and Tarnelberry...it is clearer. This is tough stuff to understand.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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