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horsegirl

Restaurant Frustration

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drug companies are in the business of selling drugs by they have to be aware of all allergies and list all ingredients for the consumers so they can avoid allergies, why are resteraunts not held to the same standard?

If I buy a bowling ball or pool stick while I'm on vacation out of state should I not be able to take those to my local pool hall or bowling alley because I didn't buy them there? If I go to a waterpark should I not be able to swim there unless I buy my bathing suit there? They are in the business of selling pool sticks, bowling balls, and bathing suits, but you can still bring stuff in from outside if you want.

Not the same thing....in law drug companies and food manufacturers/restaurants have "absolute" liability. It's not the same level of liability as a pool hall or bowing alley or a waterpark. With those places the injured party has to prove to the court that negligence occurred; with things consumed the drug company or restaurant or food manufacturer has to prove the negligence didn't happen. Different levels of responsibility exist. This is probably why some restaurants refuse outside food because they are aware of this; and some allow outside food: because they are not aware of how much risk they are taking in accepting outside food or they know you as a customer and know you won't pull any nonsense and sue them if your food is the problem. For instance, let's say you choke on your own food and have to be rushed to hospital. Who's to say that they won't be afraid that you will sue them because they neglected to give you the Heimlich procedure in time? As far as they knew, you didn't order anything from the menu. Or they are afrid that your outside food may contain listeria or salmonella and they don't want that risk.

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I do understand the restaurant's point of view in that I'm not a paying customer. I would argue that if I wasn't allowed to eat there, none of my friends would either. There are other restaurants that will allow me to bring my food or can serve me that we would go to.

To me, this is the best way to get them to see your point

I will note that I do tip as if I ate a meal - the server still brings me drinks, even if it's just water, and for that I am grateful. I also don't think we are entitled to accommodation - I don't think this falls under disability laws. I'm trying to come up with a good example of a similar situation - the best I can come up with is amusement parks not accommodating people in wheelchairs - you can get into the facility, but you may not be able to ride the rides. No one is forcing you to eat in a restaurant. If it's a work function, that's a work issue not a restaurant issue.

I'd like to futher this by saying that if you are going to bring your own food on the side do so quietly and order something off the menu as a "cover." They can't accuse you of "freeloading" if you pay for something.

I'm fascinated that this thread has caused so much controversy! I'm super stubborn about not letting this disease get in the way of leading a normal life so to me it only seemed natural to bring my own food when I can't eat what's being served. It hadn't even occured to me that others would have such a strong opposite viewpoint.

From what I am reading, I am getting the message that the opposite view is based on an emotional level: and it's understandable as eating out is an important social activity which should be enjoyed by all. The emotional part is the particpant's feeling of being disenfranchised with the rest of society. If restauranteurs understood this, we wouldn't have such a large problem over it.

Since we seem to be all over the map here, I'd be interested in what everyone thinks about the following questions: How much accommodation in regards to food can one expect from a work function? What about from friends who you go out with frequently (and thus would tire of our limited restaurant choices)? If you are someone who will not bring your own food to restaurants, has this affected your social life in any way?

Work functions should absolutely include someone with a special diet and seek out caterers and restaurants who will do the job correctly. Co workers should know you have a gluten problem and always choose a restaurant that the celiac can safely go to. However, if they don't know you have a gluten problem, the co workers can't help.

Friends should not take the position that they are tired of the same choices. They should be thinking "There for the grace of God go I" and be a real friend and accept it. I have a friend who tells me the same stories over and over and I let her because my life would be "less" without her and those stories and if anything ever happened to her I would miss even those stupid stories.

I am not offended by someone who brings their own food to restaurant. We sneak in our own bread and butter (BYOB has another meaning to us :P )

HOWEVER: I would be embarassed if a co worker who DID NOT have a health diet issue and was only being cheap and if they brought their own food to a restaurant....I mean they wouldn't have a leg to stand on if the restaurant manager called them on it. And it would embarass me further if they lied about having a health diet issue. I would not go to lunch/dinner or whatever with them again. That clearly would be using another person's misfortune in a warped way.

A few years ago I put together my 25th Wedding Anniversary party and a couple of catering places refused to accomodate gluten free meal and one even said we could not bring in gluten free bread for my husband, the only person who needed the gluten free. Even when I told them that he was the host and the bill payer they were not interested in accomodating us.....this was the Galloping Hill Caterers (a major player in wedding receptions) in Union, NJ and the Kenilworth Inn in Kenilworth NJ. However, The Westwood in Garwood NJ came through for us! I always told The Westwood that I'd sing their praises whenever I could.

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QUOTE (ravenwoodglass @ Jan 10 2008, 08:25 AM)

To safely feed your celiac patrons you need to:

1. Cook their food on a clean pan

2. Make sure that utensils are used only for that food

3. Make sure if water glasses are kept at the waitress station along with the bread that they be rinsed throughly before pouring and serving or offer bottled water

4. Ask if it is okay with the table to bring breads and rolls.

5. When serving do not layer or overlap plates with gluten food and non gluten food

6. Do not use sauces or spices without verifing that the person can tolerate them

7. In the kitchen, the cooks need to make sure they do not use the same gloves when preparing gluten-free meals and regular meals. There are many chances for cross contamination in restaurant kitchens and the chef/cooks need to be aware of it. (ken, I'd just ask them to use fresh gloves when praring my dishes)..great idea thanks Hope we can keep this list going.

I know we all remember that we need to tip them so well. Sometimes I write the chef a thank you note after I leave. Of course, this wouldn't be on this list. :lol:

This is a great list and this is what a special class for servers should include.

Unfortunately, this (the items 1-7) is part of the nature of the problem: the restaurant does not want all this responsibility. They want quick and easy ....a march of customers coming and in out which do not require special handling which will clog up their assembly line of food preparation in the kitchen, special handing which will increase their lawsuit risk, special handling which costs them more money and staff.

Now I am not saying that they are morally right taking this position, but it certainly is what is going on and it's our reality.

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I know we all remember that we need to tip them so well. Sometimes I write the chef a thank you note after I leave. Of course, this wouldn't be on this list.

Sending a note to the chef is a great idea. It should be on the list. Often they have to answer to the boss too. Chefs and owners, are always at each other over food costs. The letter might help the chef to justify keeping some gluten-free foods on hand.

It would make it easier for the next one of us that happens into the place.

I also think its why its important for us to keep celiac in the media. I try to show the chefs here that being prepared for gluten-free diners is an important competitive edge. In this highly competitive restaurant industry many restaurants operate on profit margins from 12 to 40% on foods. One reason liquor is so expensive is they try to make up some of the difference. Once a restaurant is known as celiac friendly, it would do us all good to help them publicize it. Even a letter to the local newspaper is helpful, and they will appreciate it.

ken

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Hi, I am licensed insurance agent so I have some background in this stuff.

Restaurants who bar outside food are mostly likely doing this because it's a liability issue - not necessarily because they don't want to be accomodating. The risk is in them getting sued by you for foreign objects in the food or food poisioning: How would they know it was something you brought in or something you ate that they made? Their necks are on the line on this one and some restaurants are just not willing to take this risk or are not aware that this risk exists.

Secondarily, it could be a health code issue for them as well.

And if you are in a Jewish Kosher restaurant, bringing in your own food is absolutely taboo.

Only solution would be to keep a list of accomodating restaurants (like Outback, etc.) so that they get your business instead of places where you can't eat. When you need to go out with co-workers, those would be the only choices of places your group would go to.

I've noticed that restaurants which are considered "white linen" are more likely to be able to accomodate a gluten free diet (Outback while it has a gluten-free menu, it not's white linen type) "White linen" are restaurants which actually still have fabric tablecloths and napkins and are higher price than the family style restaurants and are usually not chain/franchise establishments. An extreme example of "white linen" is a Hilton Hotel Restaurant. We have not as yet gone to the Hilton looking for a gluten free meal...but from what I understand about these pricey places is that they are more used to people who are traveling for business and need special accomodations).

Judy that place you went to sounds wonderful. That's great example of a restaurant knowing their clientele and wanting them as repeat customers

It's only my opinion, but I think it's time for restaurant workers to have to be "trained" in serving special diets. When a server is hired, the manager or owner should have to give them informal training about all types of diets: low fat, gluten free, aspertame free, etc. so that when a customer talks to the server about it, the server is familiar with it. I don't mean training like there's a test after it, just some basic info. I hate that "deer in the headlights" look from servers...it would also help the server in earning better tips. The next step is that a server has to be licensed by the state (has to attend a 2-hr foods/diets/handling of food class/seminar before they can work in restaurant business - this would be good for business and even better for the consumer).

White Linen places ususally are more accomodating. I know I never had a problem eating gluten free when I was visiting Las Vegas with my mom last summer. Every place we went to was so great! Even the servers knew what I needed. That's another thing, I totally agree that until servers are educated, there will continue to be problems. I had a salad the other night at Red Robin, and told the waitress to hold the bleu cheese. She brought out the food, and lo and behold, there was a pile of bleu cheese on my salad. I let her know (again) that I couldn't eat bleu cheese, and she said "Oh, you meant the bleu cheese crumbles? I thought you meant like a dressing." When I had told her to hold the bleu that was LISTED IN THE SALAD, and had asked for NO DRESSING. OMG!!! :rolleyes:

From what I am reading, I am getting the message that the opposite view is based on an emotional level: and it's understandable as eating out is an important social activity which should be enjoyed by all. The emotional part is the particpant's feeling of being disenfranchised with the rest of society. If restauranteurs understood this, we wouldn't have such a large problem over it.

This is very true I think!

Work functions should absolutely include someone with a special diet and seek out caterers and restaurants who will do the job correctly. Co workers should know you have a gluten problem and always choose a restaurant that the celiac can safely go to. However, if they don't know you have a gluten problem, the co workers can't help.

I also agree that coworkers should be concious of our eating restrictions. But they aren't always. My current office is really good about being aware most of the time. But the place I used to work for, they all knew, I told them on numerous occasions. Plus I would rarely eat out. Yet my manager still yelled at me, and I do mean YELLED (in front of patients and coworkers), for stopping to get something for myself to eat while I was out picking up everyone else's lunch. I told her I couldn't eat anything from the place they had chosen for lunch, and would clock out in the future to pick up my own food (even though both places were right next to each other in a food court). I then reminded her I had food allergies, and she said, "sure you do". Later, one of my coworkers told her that I really did have food allergies, and got seriously sick. She told her she knew that. Yet she still chose to be a jerk to me about it. This happened a lot. Which is why I no longer work there :)

The point is, when people's lives aren't ruled by food restrictions, they often tend to belittle them in other people, or just plain ignore them. In my experience, anyway. Even family does this (my stepmom and grandma both!).

Anyway, just my 2 cents : :D

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I also agree that coworkers should be concious of our eating restrictions. But they aren't always. My current office is really good about being aware most of the time. But the place I used to work for, they all knew, I told them on numerous occasions. Plus I would rarely eat out. Yet my manager still yelled at me, and I do mean YELLED (in front of patients and coworkers), for stopping to get something for myself to eat while I was out picking up everyone else's lunch. I told her I couldn't eat anything from the place they had chosen for lunch, and would clock out in the future to pick up my own food (even though both places were right next to each other in a food court). I then reminded her I had food allergies, and she said, "sure you do". Later, one of my coworkers told her that I really did have food allergies, and got seriously sick. She told her she knew that. Yet she still chose to be a jerk to me about it. This happened a lot. Which is why I no longer work there :)

The point is, when people's lives aren't ruled by food restrictions, they often tend to belittle them in other people, or just plain ignore them. In my experience, anyway. Even family does this (my stepmom and grandma both!).

Anyway, just my 2 cents : :D

If that manager keeps that up, that company will eventually be sued for Employment Practices/Discrimination/Harrassment. She needs sensitivity training and more management training otherwise she's a liability to them...and I am serious. Someone else may not be as nice as you.

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They want quick and easy ....a march of customers coming and in out which do not require special handling which will clog up their assembly line of food preparation in the kitchen, special handing which will increase their lawsuit risk, special handling which costs them more money and staff.

I agree that this is probably true of many restaurants, but there are also great chefs out there that really want to make the best possible meal for every customer, and for them it's a question of professional pride to be able to cook a delicious meal even for someone with food restrictions. I know because I've met a few. :) In my experience the difficulty is more often that wait staff might be ignorant and scared of trying to get the order right.

It's happened to me several times, I'd ask a server if it was possible to have a meal with my particular restrictions, and get a doubtful answer. Then I'd ask to speak to the chef in person, and the chef would go, of course, what is it you can have, lets figure something out.

Admittedly, I don't customers here in Holland are that prone to sue restaurants, it might be different in the US?

Pauliina

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I agree that this is probably true of many restaurants, but there are also great chefs out there that really want to make the best possible meal for every customer, and for them it's a question of professional pride to be able to cook a delicious meal even for someone with food restrictions. I know because I've met a few. :) In my experience the difficulty is more often that wait staff might be ignorant and scared of trying to get the order right.

It's happened to me several times, I'd ask a server if it was possible to have a meal with my particular restrictions, and get a doubtful answer. Then I'd ask to speak to the chef in person, and the chef would go, of course, what is it you can have, lets figure something out.

Admittedly, I don't customers here in Holland are that prone to sue restaurants, it might be different in the US?

Pauliina

Yes, Chef is willing to accomodate, but however owners probably are more interested in keeping the customers orders in a flow rather than taking the time to prepare something special that'll require too much special handing. I recall that when Burger King was a new fast food restaurant, they advertised with this song "Hold the pickle, hold the lettuce...special orders don't upset us." This was because McDonald's couldn't hande an order like "hold the special sauce." If you would order something special at McDonald's it would take a half hour to get your burger instead of 5 minutes. So Burger King attempted to show that they are OK with special orders.

In US lawsuits for negligence are filed frequently...some are real, most are bogus. No one in US would consider operating a restaurant without liability insurance due to this. Claims range from foreign object in food caused tooth/jaw injury, choking on food or food poisioning. True food poisioning however comes in clusters....same dish served to several people at different tables on same night or at a buffet or wedding. It's rarely a case where just one person has it - but it can happen. Insurance companies usually offer $$ for the person to just go away and it usually works. But then the restaurant could lose their insurance policy if too many people are suing them. I used to have a customer which was a wedding banquet hall and they had food poisioning claims at the rate of once a month. I knew not to eat there....glad I never had to go to a wedding there.

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Thanks again for all of the great replies!

Tomorrow will be the day when my staff all go out to lunch together at the Chinese place.

Today one of my coworkers asked if I'm bringing my own food; I told her I probably would sneak

some in, & that the restaurant told me it wouldn't be allowed (if they know about it).

She was aghast that the restaurant told me this, & told me if they ask me to leave or not to eat

the food I bring in, she & the rest of the staff will leave too.

Nice to have support, regardless of how it turns out!

I'll keep everyone posted on what happens.

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Good Luck tomorrow.

Nice to have the co workers support too

can't wait to hear how it goes.

Judy

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Today was the lunch out with all my coworkers, & it went beautifully. :D

Prior to leaving the office I heated up some homemade minestrone soup I'd previously made,

& my coworkers seemed glad I was taking food. I told them the restaurant had told me already

they wouldn't allow food from outside, & my boss, as well as the others, told me if the restaurant

tells me to leave, they all will leave too!

Once we got there, I pulled out my soup, asked the server for a spoon, & happily ate while

everyone else did too. The server never once asked about my soup, or if I was ordering

anything. I don't know if she didn't notice, or just didn't care. Either way, it was nice to not

be hassled about it, & to enjoy being out with my friends/coworkers. And, I didn't feel that old

"pitty potty" feeling I've had so much lately that I couldn't eat what they were. Sure, it looked &

smelled wonderful (Chinese) but it wasn't that bad at all not eating it.

Anyway, I wanted to give you all an update since everyone's been so helpful with all of this.

Thanks for all of the support & suggestions!

Horsegirl

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Either way, it was nice to not be hassled about it, & to enjoy being out with my friends/coworkers. And, I didn't feel that old"pity potty" feeling I've had so much lately that I couldn't eat what they were. Horsegirl

I am thrilled for you.

Your getting in the 'grove' girl.

It takes awhile but having your 'co-workers' supporting you like that also must have helped you feel EMPOWERED :D

i guess last summer i posted about my friend who always would go where ever i needed but this day we were starving and found a place i hadn't ck'd out and the nice waitress told me that the chef said.....there was nothing he could fix for me.

My friend ate...........feeling awful for me.........but...............what i learned was after 1 1/2 years it wasn't the food it was the company and the social time that was important........and no........i hadn't packed food as the restaurant we'd planned to go to was closed at 2:00 AND WE GOT THERE AT 2:05.

it's ALL THE PLANING BUT IT WILL GET EASIER AND YOU'LL GET MORE COMFORTABLE.

CONGRATS.

SO HAPPY FOR YOU

JUDY

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I had a comical restaurant experience last evening.....I'm presently in Florida. My sister arranged for the family members in the area to meet at a local restaurant. When it was my turn to order, I told the waitress I had food allergies and asked her what the ingredients were in the "village salad". She said they have no such item on the menu, and I pointed it out to her on the menu. Her response: "I don't know, I've never served it. What are you allergic to?" I told her, and she suggested the soup and sandwich! She wasn't about to find out what the village salad consisted of.....and she then said she could have a salad made up....I requested no dressing or croutons. I received a plate of lettuce, one sliver of tomato, 2 rings of onion. I was hoping for perhaps some cucumber or black olives also.

I happily ate my salad, and upon returning home chowed down a box of Enjoy Life chocolate chip cookies, then opened a box of their new lively lemon cookies and had them with lemon sorbet. Delicious.

It has been about 5 months since my diagnosis, and I can honestly say I am now finding it easier and easier to cook food that is edible and tastes good. Had pizza for the first time a few days ago. I made the dough in a bread machine and have learned to handle the dough wearing plastic gloves or use saran wrap to pat out the dough in the pan with no sticking. Life is becoming easier and easier thanks to the information on this wonderful forum....

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Sounds like the waitress might have been trained here in Hawaii.

My comical experience was when my wife wanted to go to a Thai place with me and as I had not checked the menu to see if there was anything besides rice I could have I tried to explain to the waiter that I could not have anything with flour so he took the flower off the table..

Had rice that night ( then a bag of gluten-free ginger snaps)

ken

I had a comical restaurant experience last evening.....I'm presently in Florida. My sister arranged for the family members in the area to meet at a local restaurant. When it was my turn to order, I told the waitress I had food allergies and asked her what the ingredients were in the "village salad". She said they have no such item on the menu, and I pointed it out to her on the menu. Her response: "I don't know, I've never served it. What are you allergic to?" I told her, and she suggested the soup and sandwich! She wasn't about to find out what the village salad consisted of.....and she then said she could have a salad made up....I requested no dressing or croutons. I received a plate of lettuce, one sliver of tomato, 2 rings of onion. I was hoping for perhaps some cucumber or black olives also.

I happily ate my salad, and upon returning home chowed down a box of Enjoy Life chocolate chip cookies, then opened a box of their new lively lemon cookies and had them with lemon sorbet. Delicious.

It has been about 5 months since my diagnosis, and I can honestly say I am now finding it easier and easier to cook food that is edible and tastes good. Had pizza for the first time a few days ago. I made the dough in a bread machine and have learned to handle the dough wearing plastic gloves or use saran wrap to pat out the dough in the pan with no sticking. Life is becoming easier and easier thanks to the information on this wonderful forum....

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Hi, I am new to this site, but have had Celiac for a long time. I always just sneak in food, not like a full course meal, but some rice cakes, or energy bars, sometimes I will even walk in without hiding the stuff, and no one ever says anything to me. I used to call and see if it was okay, but every place I called said no, you cannot bring food in. So I went without eating out with friends and family and finally liberated myself and started taking "my food" in anyways.

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Sounds like the waitress might have been trained here in Hawaii.

My comical experience was when my wife wanted to go to a Thai place with me and as I had not checked the menu to see if there was anything besides rice I could have I tried to explain to the waiter that I could not have anything with flour so he took the flower off the table..

Had rice that night ( then a bag of gluten-free ginger snaps)

ken

I tried to explain to the waiter that I could not have anything with flour so he took the flower off the table.. :blink::lol::lol:

Ken that was a 'keeper'

we should add to our list................TAKE YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR WHEN YOU GO OUT TO EAT. :lol:

Judy

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And it wasn't even an edible flower! (^_^)

I tried to explain to the waiter that I could not have anything with flour so he took the flower off the table.. :blink::lol::lol:

Ken that was a 'keeper'

we should add to our list................TAKE YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR WHEN YOU GO OUT TO EAT. :lol:

Judy

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Puglover, I do the same thing with the chips. I carry a larger handbag and bring them so I can have the salso.I dont think that I notice slight contamination. I try to avoid it but you really can drive yourself nuts worrying about it. I am really strict at home and dont eat out much. I hate fast food places. I would like to find some individually packaged gluten-free salad dressing to carry around. Also would like to find some individually packaged Tamari sauce. I eat egg drop soup from my Chinese Rest. and its okay with me.(its clear and always made with corn starch).

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Flour? :huh: Huh... :blink: Flower? :lol: ROFLOL!!

I changed my signature to include that gem! That is the funniest thing I've ever heard.

I once explained to our waitress in great detail that I could not have anything with wheat etc. She proudly brought out my dinner plate topped with three rounds of bread. As she placed it on the table she assured me that this was white bread.....no wheat at all.

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Sounds like the gluten free meal on Continental airlines -- with bagels dumped on top of the salad.

The flour/flower thing will teach me to take my cards to ethnic restaurants -- even when around the corner!

Flour? :huh: Huh... :blink: Flower? :lol: ROFLOL!!

I changed my signature to include that gem! That is the funniest thing I've ever heard.

I once explained to our waitress in great detail that I could not have anything with wheat etc. She proudly brought out my dinner plate topped with three rounds of bread. As she placed it on the table she assured me that this was white bread.....no wheat at all.

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Sounds like the gluten free meal on Continental airlines -- with bagels dumped on top of the salad.

Ah.. continental .... yeah couldn't quite work out what language they speak let alone feel safe with the food.

Practically every sign on the plane seemed to be in mixed languages ... starting off in one and finishing in the other ... I don't think I ever saw anything quite so screwed up at 35,000' ... don't get me wrong I can read/understand spanish fine but their inability to start a sentence in the same language as they finish is somewhat worrying for someone carrying you at 35,000' in a tin box iwth wings and an engine...Even those whom have English as a first language seem incapable of actually speaking English correctly... again somewhat worrying when you're stuck at 35,000' with someone flying the plane who would find a written English exam a challenge.

Just to put this into context they were similarly incapable of getting the video screen working on my seat... how hard can this be compared to flying a plane?

the peanuts available from the duty free trolley seem to be gluten-free though!

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I was off to Guam and wished it was Spanish, or Japanese or Hawaiian or English or even Chamorro.

Never could figure out what they were saying.

Ah.. continental .... yeah couldn't quite work out what language they speak let alone feel safe with the food.

Practically every sign on the plane seemed to be in mixed languages ... starting off in one and finishing in the other ... I don't think I ever saw anything quite so screwed up at 35,000' ... don't get me wrong I can read/understand spanish fine but their inability to start a sentence in the same language as they finish is somewhat worrying for someone carrying you at 35,000' in a tin box iwth wings and an engine...Even those whom have English as a first language seem incapable of actually speaking English correctly... again somewhat worrying when you're stuck at 35,000' with someone flying the plane who would find a written English exam a challenge.

Just to put this into context they were similarly incapable of getting the video screen working on my seat... how hard can this be compared to flying a plane?

the peanuts available from the duty free trolley seem to be gluten-free though!

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I AM SURPRISED by the responses! I have no problem bringing my own food into a restaurant. You can not send it back to the kitchen, of course! A few restaurants will only let you do it if you order something (even with the allergy. I have sometimes ordered a side salad and brought my own dressing for it. Or you can order a side that only costs a dollar or two and not eat it! But if one is rude or doesn't, I won't eat there. I tell everyone I know and we won't go there. They will not get my business! (There is a bowling alley that we will not go to for this purpose...we drive an additional half hour for one that allows us to bring in what we want and in return I make it clear to any other customers that it is only because I have an allergy because I would not want the owner to have to deal with others complaining!

Anyway, I would try telling the people you work with about this and try choosing better restaurants. A few that are common and actually HAVE GLUTEN FREE MENUS are Outback (MY FAVORITE!!!), Olive Garden (sorry no pasta), and Carrabas. All of these places allow you to bring in your own bread and I have always been very well taken care of at them! OUTBACK EVEN HAS A gluten-free BROWNIE!!!! I had my wedding reception there for that very reason! Good luck and God Bless....PS, you should try making homemade bread. I make great sandwiches now that doesn't have to be heated to taste good!!!

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PS, you should try making homemade bread. I make great sandwiches now that doesn't have to be heated to taste good!!!

What's your recipe for bread? I havn't made any gluten-free bread yet, but am thinking seriously about it, because the ones in the store are pretty nasty (especially since ones like Kinnickinnick make theirs

with eggs or milk, which I also cannot have).

Thanks!

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On my last flight I decided to try Express Jet because on their website it said I could choose a fruit plate with yogurt as my meal. No, they never heard of such a thing once I was on the plane, but I was assured that on my return flight there would be more to choose from. Nope, they don't even have nuts or chips. They have pre-prepared sandwiches, crackers and sun chips. I got a tiny bag of baby carrots and a water. Thank goodness I brought trail mix!

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