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My daughter is ten and in fifth grade. I met with her teacher before school started about how to handle celiac in school. At the meeting she said that she would like to bake with the class and I said I would think about it. I called the GI department at Children's, talked it over with my daughter, and my sister who's son has celiac. All three said it wasn't a good idea bc they were worried about cross contamination. I sent the nurse at the school what I thought was a nice thanks but no thanks note and she wrote back no problem. The nurse would let the teacher know and my daughter would skip the baking.

Then the following week the teacher baked anyways and told my daughter it was safe for her. dd refused to eat it because she worries about being sick and is super cautious. Ever since then every time I talk to this teacher about anything she brings up the baking. How she spent $18.99 on a bag of gluten-free flour, etc. etc. How much all the other kids love baking. How it should have been my daughter who told her she didn't want to bake not me. It makes me want to scream. Just wanted to complain, since I find it isn't productive to scream at a teacher. It is not as if I thought - oh I will give my kid an incurable autoimmune disease, so she can get out of baking on Friday afternoons.

We had a conference last week and she brought it up again! She brought it up at the back to school night and told how much the kids love baking. She brought it up when we bumped into her in the hallway to talk about something else.

How do you feel about baking at school? Our GI said "no" and I worried about cross contamination and I find even when people have the best intentions they mess up. (eg my aunt bought my daughter wheat free Newman's cookies as a treat not realizing they are made with Barley flour instead or my mom is far sighted and can't read the tiny print on the labels and sometimes messes up and she is really trying.) How old should kids be when they make these type of decisions? How do you make someone understand this?

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Not much time to write, but I think the teacher is flat our wrong on this one. Baking would be an absolute no in my book....gluten free is much too difficult for anyone not on the diet to understand. Most people on the diet take a good 6 months to stop making mistakes, and even then mistakes still happen. We don't let anyone cook for our kids, no matter if they buy a Betty Crocker mix or whatever, cross contamination is something most people really don't get unless they have to live it.

I would really be ticked that the teacher ignored your instructions....and I would probably go to the principal. We did this last year after a speech therapist just didn't "get it" and ignored the fact that I told her on the phone to not give my dd the treat...she did anyway b/c she thought it was safe b/c it didn't say "gluten" in the ingredients.

Hope you get things straightened out! We have had great teachers for the most part, but we did have a rough Kindy year for my dd. The teacher had 20+ years experience, and was a great teacher, but not so enlightened regarding food allergies. She didn't listen to a word I said about Celiac, and Emmie got sick several times that year...it was awful. I really feel for ya, it is so hard to not have the teacher on the same page!

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I second the idea to go to the principal. Not only did she ignore your instructions but she continues to harass you about it. Uncool.

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I am new to all this- but if you had a note from your GI, you asked her not to- as her mother, and she obviously still does not understand that she is putting your child at risk of getting sick. I would go to the principal. I think the teacher needs to understand that this is not you trying to deny your daughter the opportunity - but you are trying to keep her healthy.

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My daughter is ten and in fifth grade. I met with her teacher before school started about how to handle celiac in school. At the meeting she said that she would like to bake with the class and I said I would think about it. I called the GI department at Children's, talked it over with my daughter, and my sister who's son has celiac. All three said it wasn't a good idea bc they were worried about cross contamination. I sent the nurse at the school what I thought was a nice thanks but no thanks note and she wrote back no problem. The nurse would let the teacher know and my daughter would skip the baking.

Then the following week the teacher baked anyways and told my daughter it was safe for her. dd refused to eat it because she worries about being sick and is super cautious. Ever since then every time I talk to this teacher about anything she brings up the baking. How she spent $18.99 on a bag of gluten-free flour, etc. etc. How much all the other kids love baking. How it should have been my daughter who told her she didn't want to bake not me. It makes me want to scream. Just wanted to complain, since I find it isn't productive to scream at a teacher. It is not as if I thought - oh I will give my kid an incurable autoimmune disease, so she can get out of baking on Friday afternoons.

We had a conference last week and she brought it up again! She brought it up at the back to school night and told how much the kids love baking. She brought it up when we bumped into her in the hallway to talk about something else.

How do you feel about baking at school? Our GI said "no" and I worried about cross contamination and I find even when people have the best intentions they mess up. (eg my aunt bought my daughter wheat free Newman's cookies as a treat not realizing they are made with Barley flour instead or my mom is far sighted and can't read the tiny print on the labels and sometimes messes up and she is really trying.) How old should kids be when they make these type of decisions? How do you make someone understand this?

My question is, how does baking fit into the curriculum? Is she covering a math concept? If so, how long will this last? I would approach your principal with these questions. I would also explain that Celiac is serious, and by having any cross containmination could harm your child's immune system.

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My question is, how does baking fit into the curriculum? Is she covering a math concept? If so, how long will this last? I would approach your principal with these questions. I would also explain that Celiac is serious, and by having any cross containmination could harm your child's immune system.

I did go to the principal and since the school has a strict no food sharing policy because of food allergies and I believe she made the teacher stop the baking. I believe this is why the teacher is pissed and brings it up every time we have a conversation. She brought up the baking at the curriculum night and told everyone how much the children loved it an how it was this incredible thing, yada, yada, yada. It was not part of the curriculum in any way. It was supposed to be a fun activity "choice" for the last part of the day on Fridays, others were doodling and scrap booking, which is why I didn't see any reason we shouldn't opt out quietly. The thing that makes me really angry is when she brings up the price of the bag of Pamela's and then points to it as an example of how I am over-parenting and that my kid should be the one telling her these things. She was diagnosed in June. It is not as if we have been dealing with this for years. I am completely aware of how much gluten-free products are. I also know how sick dd got when we were visiting relatives and trying our best to cook in other people's kitchens.

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Your daughter did tell her. She refused to eat what she knew would be unsafe for her. I say bravo to your kid! She stood up to an obviously pushy and overbearing authority figure. What an awesome strong girl you are raising!

Can you give the teacher the money for the flour? Tell her that your sorry she felt the need to override your dr's orders. Tell her you are feeling harassed. If you don't have a 504 in place, it might be a good idea to get one. That makes it a legal issue to go over your head. It's sad it has to come to this sometimes, but some people just don't get it.

Give your girl a lot of credit! Refusing to eat that stuff took lots of moxie!

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OMG, I am SO sorry! First of all, PLEASE do not give her the money for the mix!!! After how nasty she has been? Heck NO. And if the harassment continues I would go to the superintendent. This is no different than harrassing a special needs child for needing a diaper. Everyone is different, you did ALL the right things and this teacher is a creep!!!!!!!!!

And, what on earth are they doing baking in 5th grade? All the time? I shouldn't be surprised though as my twin daughters missed a week of 4th grade last week and only had 2 hours of makeup work. They told us "see we don't do much at school." That is why we homeschool them in math as they waste the day in public school.

Keep you chin up, be proud of your daughter!!!!

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She'll never take the money. She will be embarrassed that she made such a big deal about it.

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Your daughter did tell her. She refused to eat what she knew would be unsafe for her. I say bravo to your kid! She stood up to an obviously pushy and overbearing authority figure. What an awesome strong girl you are raising!

Can you give the teacher the money for the flour? Tell her that your sorry she felt the need to override your dr's orders. Tell her you are feeling harassed. If you don't have a 504 in place, it might be a good idea to get one. That makes it a legal issue to go over your head. It's sad it has to come to this sometimes, but some people just don't get it.

Give your girl a lot of credit! Refusing to eat that stuff took lots of moxie!

Thanks I really appreciate the support.

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Taking a look from another angle. It seems to me the teacher meant well, even though she probably doesn't have a clue about cross contamination issues etc. She attempted to include the child in a school activity the other kids were doing, and spent her own money to try and make that happen. It would have made more sense for her to contact you first before taking that on though, since it is a medical condition and it's doubtful she has the knowledge about celiac you do. Also since it is a medical condition, she should not have included the child without getting permission from the parent. It's kind of like a field trip, the schools ask for permission before taking the kids out of their normal environment. It seems like she assumed she knew what the risks were and could evaluate reasonableness of the activities risks herself, without any parental input. I don't think that makes her a bad person, but kind of a normal person who doesn't understand the gluten-free diet and it's requirements. The school would probably do well to consider a policy about these type of situations, to guide them with any medical conditions a child might have. A policy of always getting parental approval before putting a child with a medical condtion in a potentially aggravating situation would seem helpful. If you need permission slips for a field trip, it seems reasonable to consider permission slips for medical risks also. Maybe the have such a policy but she didn't think the situation fit? She could probably use some education on celiac issues.

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Taking a look from another angle. It seems to me the teacher meant well, even though she probably doesn't have a clue about cross contamination issues etc. She attempted to include the child in a school activity the other kids were doing, and spent her own money to try and make that happen. It would have made more sense for her to contact you first before taking that on though, since it is a medical condition and it's doubtful she has the knowledge about celiac you do. Also since it is a medical condition, she should not have included the child without getting permission from the parent. It's kind of like a field trip, the schools ask for permission before taking the kids out of their normal environment. It seems like she assumed she knew what the risks were and could evaluate reasonableness of the activities risks herself, without any parental input. I don't think that makes her a bad person, but kind of a normal person who doesn't understand the gluten-free diet and it's requirements. The school would probably do well to consider a policy about these type of situations, to guide them with any medical conditions a child might have. A policy of always getting parental approval before putting a child with a medical condtion in a potentially aggravating situation would seem helpful. If you need permission slips for a field trip, it seems reasonable to consider permission slips for medical risks also. Maybe the have such a policy but she didn't think the situation fit? She could probably use some education on celiac issues.

This is the correspondence I had with the school on the first day. I met with the teacher and the school nurse the week before. In our discussion we decided that the teacher would send any recipes to me to review before she ate anything at school. I sent this to the school nurse two days later as a follow up. I deleted the actual names. The teacher was new to the school so I didn't have a way to contact her. I understand that she can make a mistake what I don't understand is why she brings it up every time we talk as an example of my daughter's bad behavior.

S--

Totally understandable. I forwarded your e-mail to Beth. I think this could

be handled with Zaida opting out of the baking and not making a big deal

out of it at all.--Ixx

On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 09:54:25 -0400, sxxx<sxx>

wrote:

Hi Ixxx,

Z and D and I had a conversation at dinner last night. She

really prefers that she only eat foods from home and doesn't want to

worry about trying foods baked at CFS. She doesn't want to stop the

other kids from baking or be difficult about it and she appreciates

the effort to try gluten-free baking, but it really makes her too nervous. Hope

that's OK with everyone.

Thanks,

S

--

IU

School Nurse

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This is the correspondence I had with the school on the first day. I met with the teacher and the school nurse the week before. In our discussion we decided that the teacher would send any recipes to me to review before she ate anything at school.

Huh, sounds like you were willing to have her participate right? As long as they gave you a chance to review the recipes first. So it seems the school didn't follow through the way you expected by sharing the recipes before hand? I wonder why she brings it up also. Maybe it's that she wants to work it out somehow?

Well, I am not at all critical about it, you have every right of course to control the things she is exposed to at school, if they would affect her health.

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Huh, sounds like you were willing to have her participate right? As long as they gave you a chance to review the recipes first. So it seems the school didn't follow through the way you expected by sharing the recipes before hand? I wonder why she brings it up also. Maybe it's that she wants to work it out somehow?

Well, I am not at all critical about it, you have every right of course to control the things she is exposed to at school, if they would affect her health.

The teacher brings it up repeatedly as the prime example of something that my kid should be responsible for communicating to her. It is used as the example of how she is not an 'independent learner'. I think if she was diabetic for example no one would have an expectation like that. Even a super 'independent' kid shouldn't be responsible for communicating information like that. It mixes academic expectations with her medical needs. It is hurtful as well. It already kind of stinks that she shouldn't participate in something that all the other children enjoy. I think it makes it a bit worse to dwell on it two months later. If she had just dropped it, I wouldn't be complaining, but it comes up in every conversation about things completely unrelated.

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Wow. If it were me, I'd give the teacher a $20 dollar bill and then ask her, "are you done now? can we move on?" With a huge smile on my face.....But I am sh*t disturber as my father tells me. :lol:

Good luck with that teacher.....looks like she doesn't know how to let go.

Bravo to your little one though!

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It's too bad you don't know about a potentially embarrasing medical condition the teacher has so that you can bring that up every time you meet. "That farting you did in front of the class on the morning of the 23rd showed poor judgement on your part. You should have warned the class you had Polish sausage for breakfast that day and might be flatulent. A more independent thinker would have done so."

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You can't hear this enough -- that is a GREAT kid you have there! Being able to say no and stick to it is a incredibly valuable skill for a tweenage girl with food issues. Good for her for communicating, and for you for sticking by her unapologetically.

Now, you have a teachable moment. You cannot stop this annoying teacher behavior. But, here's a chance to teach your daughter another great celiac lifeskill: Ignoring People Who Just Don't Get It. When the teacher brings it up, just kill her with kindess and polite behavior. You know, the way you'd talk to the slightly odd person on the bus. If she is agitated and annoyed with you, still, you can eventually move to something like "I really would rather not talk about this any more, we're happy with how it worked out for her and appreciate your effort". You are modelling the behavior for your child. And apparently this teacher is going to give you the opportunity to model it again and again! (I once had a teacher aghast at the cost she'd paid for gluten-free pretzels. I just went "omigosh i KNOW!! can you imagine my GROCERY bill?!" That was the end of that pity-party)

I'd avoid the principal, myself. Just pushes it into another level of confrontation. Save the principal for something bigger than an annoying teacher who won't get over it already. You've done good!

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I have been thinking about this more with everyone's responses and for me the main issue is that I need to trust that the adults in my child's life will take this seriously and follow my instructions and not try to countermand them or make me feel like I am too protective. In our case, we decided that a simple one sentence rule - she will only eat food she brings from home - would be simple, easy to remember, clear and easy to follow. I want the teacher to be focused on teaching math or writing not reading labels or running around buying gluten-free flour. For me the thought that the most ordinary foods like bread and cookies or even just a crumb can cause such awful pain and damage is somewhat daunting. With a kid who is a pre-teen I am trying to giver her as much power and control as makes sense as well. She will have this for the rest of her life as far as I know and will need to learn to cope in many social settings.

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"for me the main issue is that I need to trust that the adults in my child's life will take this seriously and follow my instructions"

I am totally with you here, but I just don't think most people can get that far out of their own box. Even well meaning people make mistakes all the time, and I don't think you can really trust very many people to follow your gluten-free instructions. One of my dearest friends had a birthday party where all of the kids made pizzas. She prepared a gluten free alternative I had provided for my son, then I arrived to find him eating it directly on the flour covered table the other kids had rolled their dough on.

Thank heavens your daughter is old enough to protect herself, and is doing so. If this teacher wants to discuss it further, I would say, "I know it is hard to understand, but a tiny grain of gluten you can't even see can make a hole in my daughter's intestines." I've had people gag when I say this, but my bet is that this teacher still wouldn't get it.

I'm sorry you are stuck with this one all year, and it sounds like you have handled things wonderfully

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The teacher brings it up repeatedly as the prime example of something that my kid should be responsible for communicating to her. It is used as the example of how she is not an 'independent learner'.

This statement is just utter crap. If the teacher could move beyond her own fixation with Friday baking, she would be able to see that your daughter DID exhibit "independent" learning skills simply by saying "NO" to the food offered. It's a lot easier to just be quiet and go with the flow than to stand up in front of an authority figure and all of your peers by going against the grain. How dense is this woman that she cannot see this?

Since you're bound to hear about this over and over again, I would probably be polite, but curt with her on the next occasion. I'd tell her this, "Under normal, non-medical circumstances, I'm sure that it would have been more appropriate for my daughter to communicate this with you directly. However, seeing first hand your propensity to bring this topic up ad nauseum, I can see why my daughter would choose to have me try to get this through to you. As it stands, it doesn't seem like you're very good at listening or perhaps you are simply forgetting that we've since had this same discussion at least 5 times previously. I'm sorry that our daughter's medical condition cuts down the amount of baking time you have in school. Unfortunately, this is simply beyond our control. So....is there anything new you would like to add or can we now move on? If it would help, I can provide you with a direct number to my daughter's gastroenterologist if you feel he/she reached this diagnosis in error and is mistaken about the seriousness of cross contamination issues. Otherwise, how is my daughter doing in regards to her actual education?" Or, a more passive-aggressive approach: "Is English your first language?" :P

For Christmas, I think I'd buy her a gluten-free baking book that she'll be able to use all of that extra flour on. :lol:

I'm sorry you and your daughter are challenged with this woman on top of a new diagnosis. You are doing the right thing. And your daughter is an amazing young lady to have found the courage to say no in such an awkward situation. I think that merits some extra at-home baking time for the holidays. I think your daughter ROCKS!

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This statement is just utter crap. If the teacher could move beyond her own fixation with Friday baking, she would be able to see that your daughter DID exhibit "independent" learning skills simply by saying "NO" to the food offered. It's a lot easier to just be quiet and go with the flow than to stand up in front of an authority figure and all of your peers by going against the grain. How dense is this woman that she cannot see this?

Since you're bound to hear about this over and over again, I would probably be polite, but curt with her on the next occasion. I'd tell her this, "Under normal, non-medical circumstances, I'm sure that it would have been more appropriate for my daughter to communicate this with you directly. However, seeing first hand your propensity to bring this topic up ad nauseum, I can see why my daughter would choose to have me try to get this through to you. As it stands, it doesn't seem like you're very good at listening or perhaps you are simply forgetting that we've since had this same discussion at least 5 times previously. I'm sorry that our daughter's medical condition cuts down the amount of baking time you have in school. Unfortunately, this is simply beyond our control. So....is there anything new you would like to add or can we now move on? If it would help, I can provide you with a direct number to my daughter's gastroenterologist if you feel he/she reached this diagnosis in error and is mistaken about the seriousness of cross contamination issues. Otherwise, how is my daughter doing in regards to her actual education?" Or, a more passive-aggressive approach: "Is English your first language?" :P

For Christmas, I think I'd buy her a gluten-free baking book that she'll be able to use all of that extra flour on. :lol:

I'm sorry you and your daughter are challenged with this woman on top of a new diagnosis. You are doing the right thing. And your daughter is an amazing young lady to have found the courage to say no in such an awkward situation. I think that merits some extra at-home baking time for the holidays. I think your daughter ROCKS!

Thanks - I couldn't have said it better myself and when she brings it up again, I will say that. I think my daughter rocks too. I am very impressed with her ability to cope with this. It's not easy when they bring out the pizza and cookies at every kids social gathering.

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Thanks - I couldn't have said it better myself and when she brings it up again, I will say that. I think my daughter rocks too. I am very impressed with her ability to cope with this. It's not easy when they bring out the pizza and cookies at every kids social gathering.

You know, I've been thinking about your situation most of the day. And I thought of one more thing you could say to this woman. "Do you think she'll have trouble being accepted into college if it's discovered that she doesn't bake well with others?" ;)

Try your best to keep your cool. We all know that isn't easy at times....but it is necessary because certain parts of the situation aren't going to go away. You do need to find ways to work with your child's teachers. And you also need to ensure your daughter's safety while in school. Safety should be the priority...and a good teacher will be on board with that.

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The teacher brings it up repeatedly as the prime example of something that my kid should be responsible for communicating to her. It is used as the example of how she is not an 'independent learner'. I think if she was diabetic for example no one would have an expectation like that. Even a super 'independent' kid shouldn't be responsible for communicating information like that. It mixes academic expectations with her medical needs. It is hurtful as well. It already kind of stinks that she shouldn't participate in something that all the other children enjoy. I think it makes it a bit worse to dwell on it two months later. If she had just dropped it, I wouldn't be complaining, but it comes up in every conversation about things completely unrelated.

I believe the whole - 'you attract more flies with honey than vinegar' - plus you never want to make enemies in your kids' school - but you also need to advocate for your kid. My fear is this: if the teacher keeps crabbing to you about it, does that also mean she's making snide or pouting remarks to your daughter? THAT would not be cool. You're daughter is a child, and children should not have to stand up to an adult, much less a teacher who controls their day and their grades.

That said - I'd respond with something like: "Yeah, I heard the prinicpal nixed the whole cooking thing, and I guess I don't blame him because of all the other kids besides my daughter who have food allergies and intolerances - after all, no school would want to be responsible for seriously compromising a child's health. But I also don't blame you for being disappointed - I enjoy cooking also. So I'm glad you're venting to me about it rather than to my daughter or any of the other children with intolerances or allergies, because they didn't ask to be born with celiac's disease or allergies, and it's so hard to be different as a kid. So again, I'm so glad you're venting to me instead of to the kids. Here's my home number if you want to ever call me.'

Of course you're bluffing, she won't call you, but you're very nicely putting her on notice that it's an issue between adults, and to NOT say anything to your daughter.

Maybe say all that in an email, so you can make sure your wording is right. If you try it in person, you may get angry. And if you're angry, she'll probably respond with defensiveness and not even listen. Humans don't listen well when they are defensive or emotional. Also, if it's verbal, she can twist it around in her memory or forget exactly what you said.

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I am going to reply to this as a teacher and a parent of 2 children with celiac and as an adult with it.

Teacher mode: The teacher was trying her best to try to include the whole class and by doing that she went out and spent her own money to make sure that that happened. Good job to her. But with that said if a dr had said no and you had contacted the school and said no then it should have been dropped and your daughter should have been given an alternate assignment.

Parent Mode: OOOOO I would be hot. I would call the principal if nothing happened then I would call the supertedent. I would try to be polite and reach an aggrement and I would educate the teacher about the consequences of your daughter and glutten. I would continue to educate her until she gets the picture. But as a parent if it a cooking activity and the teacher was going to provide and try to make something gluten-free then I would volenteer to go up to the school and cook with the class to monitor and make sure that everything was done gluten-free and then you could say no I am sorry this is not gluten-free or you could say enjoy daughter it is gluten-free. As parents we have to proactive in our childrens education and their health care needs. I am not saying that you are not but this is a way that we have learned to get through the system with 2 children in school. I have 5 children from a 10th grader down to a 1st grader. Over the years I have had to get very in the face of teachers because some of them have a tough time following the rules. My son's teacher this year is that way. The first day of school I went in and took a snack ben in the room and told her everything that he can have and can't have and went through and told her that if he gets anything it needs to be run by me and if it is a short notice thing then just give him one of his treats out of the box. She agreed and then 3 hours later gave him a ice cream cone. She told him that she needed a dish of ice cream and she said no just eat it off the top dont eat the cone. Ugh he threw it away. She got a not so nice email from me that also was sent all the way to the top of the district and it has not happened again. I have also found that if you talk to parents about stuff they can help if you trust someone then they can help you go for cooking activities or they can help with party events. I went to my son's Christmas party and one of the parents bought my son some gluten-free cookies and left them in the package and wrote on it Merry Christmas these are for Braunson only. It made his day.

All I can say is use your resources and be proactive in you childs school and go to the top of the district if need be. Good luck. I am wishing you the best in a tough situation.

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I am going to reply to this as a teacher and a parent of 2 children with celiac and as an adult with it.

Teacher mode: The teacher was trying her best to try to include the whole class and by doing that she went out and spent her own money to make sure that that happened. Good job to her. But with that said if a dr had said no and you had contacted the school and said no then it should have been dropped and your daughter should have been given an alternate assignment.

Parent Mode: OOOOO I would be hot. I would call the principal if nothing happened then I would call the supertedent. I would try to be polite and reach an aggrement and I would educate the teacher about the consequences of your daughter and glutten. I would continue to educate her until she gets the picture. But as a parent if it a cooking activity and the teacher was going to provide and try to make something gluten-free then I would volenteer to go up to the school and cook with the class to monitor and make sure that everything was done gluten-free and then you could say no I am sorry this is not gluten-free or you could say enjoy daughter it is gluten-free. As parents we have to proactive in our childrens education and their health care needs. I am not saying that you are not but this is a way that we have learned to get through the system with 2 children in school. I have 5 children from a 10th grader down to a 1st grader. Over the years I have had to get very in the face of teachers because some of them have a tough time following the rules. My son's teacher this year is that way. The first day of school I went in and took a snack ben in the room and told her everything that he can have and can't have and went through and told her that if he gets anything it needs to be run by me and if it is a short notice thing then just give him one of his treats out of the box. She agreed and then 3 hours later gave him a ice cream cone. She told him that she needed a dish of ice cream and she said no just eat it off the top dont eat the cone. Ugh he threw it away. She got a not so nice email from me that also was sent all the way to the top of the district and it has not happened again. I have also found that if you talk to parents about stuff they can help if you trust someone then they can help you go for cooking activities or they can help with party events. I went to my son's Christmas party and one of the parents bought my son some gluten-free cookies and left them in the package and wrote on it Merry Christmas these are for Braunson only. It made his day.

All I can say is use your resources and be proactive in you childs school and go to the top of the district if need be. Good luck. I am wishing you the best in a tough situation.

I like your two modes. I was also a teacher and tried to see it through her eyes. We decided that she, as my daughter put it, 'just doesn't get it.' The day after Thanksgiving she asked if it was ok to give my daughter chocolate that she bought for the class even though it said 'that it may contain gluten' on the label. I told her it wasn't and reminded her that the school does not allow food sharing or candy. She said, "but I don't want her to look different than the other kids. How about I give it to her and then she doesn't eat it. She can give it to you later?" I think this teacher is having all sorts of trouble with making sensible decisions and I am not the only dissatisfied parent. We have a meeting with the head of the school next week. Wish me luck.

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