Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
Sunflower Girl

Positive Blood Tests - Why Is My Gp Sending Me To A Rheumatologist First?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Has anyone had a similar experience?

After experiencing some symptoms and hearing that there can be a link between Hashimoto's (which I have) and celiac, I asked my PCP to test me for celiac. A few days later, I received a call from his office that my celiac blood tests were positive, and that they are now working on a referral for me to see a rheumatologist. My doctor has left for a vacation, so I can't follow up with him to find out why my next step is not a biopsy? (As I have now read over and over is the norm.)

If you've been through this, would you please share some insight with me? I would really appreciate some info. to calm my nerves a bit!

I noticed others on these boards post their test results and other related information to paint a complete picture, so I will, too.

TEST/// RESULT/// REFERENCE INTERVAL

Deamidated Gliadin Abs, IgA/// 25/// Weak Positive 20 - 30

" IgG/// 30/// Weak Positive 20 - 30

tTG IgA/// 20/// Positive >10

tTg IgG/// 8/// Weak Positive 6 - 9

Endomysial Antibody IgA/// Positive Abnormal/// Negative

Immunoglobulin A, Qn, Serum/// 211/// 70 - 400

My paternal grandmother and my father had hypothyroidism; my sister has both Hashimoto's and celiac, so there are definitely genetic factors at work here. I've had five negative biopsies on nodules in my thyroid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh. Honestly I think your GP just might not know that a GI is better informed than a rheumatologist when it comes to celiac. (actually I think a car mechanic is better infOrmed about medicine than a rheumatologist, but I'm a bitter angry girl!)

If you only want confIrmation of celiac, you might call back and assert yourself by Insisting on a GI doc. I bet with a history of AI disorders in your family, your GP assumed a rheum would be fine. A GI doc is who'd do a biopsy anyway, so why waste time with a rheum if you don't need to yet?

Good luck.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing your doc is thinking a rheumatologist because they specialize in autoimmunity. You are right that what you need is a GI for a biopsy.

I've read a lot of medical literature, and everything I've read suggests that you're definitely celiac with the positive endomysial antibodies and deamidated gliadin. There are some articles that argue that a biopsy is not even necessary with such clear test results. If you do want the biopsy you need to keep eating gluten to get an accurate test. I think it would also be reasonable to accept a celiac diagnosis, decline a referral, and stop eating gluten based on the blood tests.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with skylark! While a biopsy/endoscopy isn't the worst test in the world, it's really knd of redundant in this case. Unless you have concerns about diagnosing ulcers or h. pylori.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and I forgot to say mine gave me nightmares even though I was sedated. I wouldn't suggest if if you can avoid it. :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ya, i agree... i think the biopsy is pointless. you're positive enough. plus u have Hashimoto's.. u need to avoid gluten anyways. you're totally positive in my opinion. if i were in your shoes, i wouldnt need any more proof.

the big question is why she's sending u to a rheumi?? unless she wants to cover all the basis and test for ALL the AI diseases... but that's not very common in this country for them to be so thorough and on top of things. and all your test results were Celiac tests... i didnt see anything on there that would suggest to look for other diseases. do u have any other weird symptoms & questions that would point to looking at other things???

ya i agree with everyone above- and i would call and ask why she's sending u to a Rheumi... maybe she just had a little brain fog that day :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone had a similar experience?

After experiencing some symptoms and hearing that there can be a link between Hashimoto's (which I have) and celiac, I asked my PCP to test me for celiac. A few days later, I received a call from his office that my celiac blood tests were positive, and that they are now working on a referral for me to see a rheumatologist. My doctor has left for a vacation, so I can't follow up with him to find out why my next step is not a biopsy? (As I have now read over and over is the norm.)

If you've been through this, would you please share some insight with me? I would really appreciate some info. to calm my nerves a bit!

I noticed others on these boards post their test results and other related information to paint a complete picture, so I will, too.

TEST/// RESULT/// REFERENCE INTERVAL

Deamidated Gliadin Abs, IgA/// 25/// Weak Positive 20 - 30

" IgG/// 30/// Weak Positive 20 - 30

tTG IgA/// 20/// Positive >10

tTg IgG/// 8/// Weak Positive 6 - 9

Endomysial Antibody IgA/// Positive Abnormal/// Negative

Immunoglobulin A, Qn, Serum/// 211/// 70 - 400

My paternal grandmother and my father had hypothyroidism; my sister has both Hashimoto's and celiac, so there are definitely genetic factors at work here. I've had five negative biopsies on nodules in my thyroid.

were these the only tests you had done?? did your doc run an ANA also??

If you had a positive ANA that would be a reason for your doc to send you to a rheumatologist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

were these the only tests you had done?? did your doc run an ANA also??

If you had a positive ANA that would be a reason for your doc to send you to a rheumatologist.

Thank you to everyone who responded; I sincerely appreciate it. This is just the information I needed.

As far as I know, I did not have the ANA test (I'll have to google that one to see what that is) as there was no mention of it on the lab results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a mildly elevated ANA that sent me to a rheum. several years after my celiac diagnosis. It's a LUPUS marker. I was blood tested every 6 months for almost 2 years and examined by the rheum. doctor. My blood level never changed and I had no symptoms so I didn't need to go any longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a mildly elevated ANA that sent me to a rheum. several years after my celiac diagnosis. It's a LUPUS marker. I was blood tested every 6 months for almost 2 years and examined by the rheum. doctor. My blood level never changed and I had no symptoms so I didn't need to go any longer.

i went to a Rheumy for 2 years too- when i was a teenager- for my elevated speckled ANA... just wanted to specify that it's just a marker for Autoimmune Disease.. not specifically Lupus. they thought i had lupus too- cause i had a butterfly rash, and the positive ANA. they also tested me for Sjorgens- i think because the way it looks- if it's speckled or not can point to different AI diseases.

unfortunately- even tho i was NEGATIVE for both- they just decided to leave it an EFFING MYSTERY- when they could have picked up the Hashimoto's i believe. i dont think my Grave's or Celiac abs were up yet... but i really hate our medical system. it's designed to keep us sick and guessing :angry:

if i was born in Italy- they would have told my mom before i left the hospital that i had 2 Dq8s...

im so over it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you to everyone who responded; I sincerely appreciate it. This is just the information I needed.

As far as I know, I did not have the ANA test (I'll have to google that one to see what that is) as there was no mention of it on the lab results.

There is no reason to do ANA (antinuclear antibodies) with a celiac panel. That one is run if you have symptoms of other autoimmune diseases like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or Sjogren's syndrome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no reason to do ANA (antinuclear antibodies) with a celiac panel. That one is run if you have symptoms of other autoimmune diseases like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or Sjogren's syndrome.

I agree that there is no reason to do an ANA with a celiac panel but with a diagnoses of or symptoms of autoimmune diseases ( such as hashimoto's and celiac's) some doctors will run an ANA as a precaution.

My endocrinologist does an ANA as part of the initial workup on new patients ( along with celiac panal,RA,hashimotos,vitamin D Levels,renal function ect...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i went to a Rheumy for 2 years too- when i was a teenager- for my elevated speckled ANA... just wanted to specify that it's just a marker for Autoimmune Disease.. not specifically Lupus. they thought i had lupus too- cause i had a butterfly rash, and the positive ANA. they also tested me for Sjorgens- i think because the way it looks- if it's speckled or not can point to different AI diseases.

unfortunately- even tho i was NEGATIVE for both- they just decided to leave it an EFFING MYSTERY- when they could have picked up the Hashimoto's i believe. i dont think my Grave's or Celiac abs were up yet... but i really hate our medical system. it's designed to keep us sick and guessing :angry:

if i was born in Italy- they would have told my mom before i left the hospital that i had 2 Dq8s...

im so over it

I don't think they automatically do DNA testing in Italy. I read and heard from Italians that they test kids under the age of 5 IF there is Celiac in the family or they have symptoms. Their medicine is no better than ours. It's also socialized medicine so testing is not done so routinely. I really don't think it matters where you are...doctors only ever look for cancer and if you don't have that, you'll have to figure out your problems on your own because they won't do it for you! Europe may be more savvy regarding Celiac but that doesn't mean the diagnosis rates are much better than in other parts of the world. Plus, there is just too much resistance from people when it comes to changing their diets a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think they automatically do DNA testing in Italy. I read and heard from Italians that they test kids under the age of 5 IF there is Celiac in the family or they have symptoms. Their medicine is no better than ours. It's also socialized medicine so testing is not done so routinely. I really don't think it matters where you are...doctors only ever look for cancer and if you don't have that, you'll have to figure out your problems on your own because they won't do it for you! Europe may be more savvy regarding Celiac but that doesn't mean the diagnosis rates are much better than in other parts of the world. Plus, there is just too much resistance from people when it comes to changing their diets a bit.

When we were recently in Italy we were told by a medical professional that it is mandatory for everyone to be tested for celiac disease by the age of 5.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think they automatically do DNA testing in Italy. I read and heard from Italians that they test kids under the age of 5 IF there is Celiac in the family or they have symptoms. Their medicine is no better than ours. It's also socialized medicine so testing is not done so routinely. I really don't think it matters where you are...doctors only ever look for cancer and if you don't have that, you'll have to figure out your problems on your own because they won't do it for you! Europe may be more savvy regarding Celiac but that doesn't mean the diagnosis rates are much better than in other parts of the world. Plus, there is just too much resistance from people when it comes to changing their diets a bit.

i believe it's Finland where the diagnosis rate for Celiac is around 70%. that's certainly better than our 2 or 3 %. it's all about money really- and Big Pharma doesnt make money off us- that's why it's not a priority here. there's pros and cons to all the different "1st world" countries no doubt. and while im very proud of how America makes it possible for us to be cutting edge sometimes... our health care system is really designed to keep us sick.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi;

About the rheumatologist - for me she's a blessing. I go to a naturopath who ran a urine test and that came back suggesting celiac. Last year's food allergy test came back avoid grains etc. So I went to my MD. He's good too, but busy. Was willing to run a celiac test, but only ran (I believe it's called) EMA which he called me and said it's negative. End of story - with him.

Luckly I had a coming appoint with my Rheum. and I asked her to run a celiac panel and a few more that I found mentioned here (thank you) Not only did she run H pylori, vit d, cal, mag, etc.... she ran a host of others I didn't come up with.

I went back to my naturopath and asked her to run a pancrea test and CA marker. (I think if I would have asked my Rheum she might of run these also)

I am thankful my Rheum is/was so willing to run the blood work. I have started no gluten/dairy/eggs/grains (started again - showed on the original year ago allergy test) as I did feel better when I was on it. No matter what the rest of the blood work comes back, I know I'm better off without it. And considering I am sero-negative RA, I could possibly be sero-negative celiac.

Glad to have found this site - thank you for all your help!

Krystalcatt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×