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GFinDC

Alternative Treatments For Adrenal Fatigue

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Not all people with Adrenal Disease have problems with their Thyroid.

 

I don't think that's what that statement says at all... I read it as an acknowlegement that people with thyroid issues are likely to also have adrenal issues and vice versa. 

The links between adrenal fatigue (or whatever term you want to use... overtaxed adrenals, tired adrenal glands...) are well known:

 

Links between adrenal fatigue and thyroid conditions:

http://www.naturalendocrinesolutions.com/articles/the-link-between-adrenal-fatigue-thyroid-conditions/

 

The link between hypothyroidism and adrenals:

http://metabolichealing.com/key-integrated-functions-of-your-body/hormone-and-endocrine/hypothyroidism-and-the-adrenals-the-intrinsic-link/

"A deeper look at adrenal, hypothalamus and thyroid relationships shows how weakened or burned out adrenal glands will cause a cascade of problems for thyroid functioning."

 

A holistic explanation of low metabolic energy:

http://www.drrind.com/therapies/metabolic-therapy

"A low adrenal function can appear like an excessively high thyroid function (e.g., both may be thin, nervous, have palpitations, be pale, have unstable temperatures etc). A low thyroid function may appear as high adrenal function (e.g., both may appear heavier than expected, have a reddish facial complexion, have stable temperatures, be or appear calm etc)."

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Thanks for the link on the research about selenium Prickly pear.  I am re-posting it here so people don't have to go looking for it to know what I am referring to.  I think I'll look for some Brazil nuts too! :)

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24437222

[Experience with selenium used to recover adrenocortical function in patients taking glucocorticosteroids long].

AIM:

To study the effect of selenium on adrenocortical function in patients taking glucocorticosteroids (GCS) long.

 

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

The study included 56 patients who had been long taking oral GCS for the underlying disease. Adrenocortical function was evaluated by a short synacthen test; adrenal insufficiency (mean cortisol level 8.2 microg/dl) was identified in 52 patients. A study group of patients (n = 35) was given selenium 200 microg/day. A control group (n = 17) with the detected adrenal insufficiency did not take it. All the patients (n = 52) continued to receive standard therapy for the underlying disease, including oral GCS.

 

RESULTS:

Adrenal function was reexamined 6 months later; the two paired-samples t-test indicated a statistically significant increase in cortisol levels up to 23.20 +/- 4.2 microg/dl (p < or = 0.05) in the patient group receiving selenium in addition to the basic therapy. In the control group, the function did not recover (cortisol levels were 8.6 and 9.8 microg/dl at baseline and at 6 months, respectively; p < or = 0.05).

 

CONCLUSION:

The experience with selenium 200 microg/day given long to patients with adrenal insufficiency caused by the long-term use of GCS shows that the agent is effective in recovering adrenocortical function.

 

Here's a link with info on selenium as a nutrient.  There is supposed to be a problem with getting too much of it, but I am not sure what that limit is.  I guess the 200 mcg amount daily for 6 months is mostly ok since they used that in the study.

 

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/

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I don't know what to think of the adrenal fatigue. I had undiagnosed celiac disease and thyroiditis for decades so I wouldn't be surprised if another organ had "issues".  An orthomolecular MD i saw noted my adrenals weren't where he wanted. He never actually used the phrase "adrenal fatigue" with me but he started me on some hormones, some of which I'm starting to question the need for.

 

My DHEA was near the bottom of the normal range. He started me on some to help it out and to raise my testosterone which was alos at the low end. U here in Alberta, DHEA is not considered a supplement and is available only through prescription.

 

I recently saw an endo for the first time (endos are almost impossible to see up here unless you have something lid=fe threatening or diabetes). The endo has told me to stop taking DHEA because it has been linked to cancer... I'm looking into this and trying to decide what to do. I'm guessing I'll drop it.

 

The orthomolecular doctor also started me on florinef, a fludrocortisone, to help with my low blood pressure. I have low sodium levels and postural hypotension and have had that for years. I would say that once a day (minimum) I used to get tunnel vision when I would stand up and get close to passing out. I used to have it down to an art: I could get up, walk, completely lose my vision and still be able to tell when I needed to sit back down before passing out. It was daily life for me and I thought it was normal.   :rolleyes:  I gotta say that it's nice not to have that any longer....

 

Now were my adrenals fatigued and not working properly over the last decade or was it something more serious? I still had postural hypotension after being gluten-free for a year so I doubt that caused it but who knows? I didn't give it a few years to wait and find out - too impatient.  LOL

 

The same doctor also started me cortef, a hydrocortisone, and to be honest, I can't remember his exact reasons for it but it did sure help when I had an autoimmune flare-up this winter - it was the mildest one I've had in years! Even so, my fasting glucose is getting high and I know that can affect it so I think it's time to revisit the need for that steroid. Plus my ACTH is now super low  so I think it's time to wean myself off of that.

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I don't know what to think of the adrenal fatigue. I had undiagnosed celiac disease and thyroiditis for decades so I wouldn't be surprised if another organ had "issues".  An orthomolecular MD i saw noted my adrenals weren't where he wanted. He never actually used the phrase "adrenal fatigue" with me but he started me on some hormones, some of which I'm starting to question the need for.

 

My DHEA was near the bottom of the normal range. He started me on some to help it out and to raise my testosterone which was alos at the low end. U here in Alberta, DHEA is not considered a supplement and is available only through prescription.

 

I recently saw an endo for the first time (endos are almost impossible to see up here unless you have something lid=fe threatening or diabetes). The endo has told me to stop taking DHEA because it has been linked to cancer... I'm looking into this and trying to decide what to do. I'm guessing I'll drop it.

 

The orthomolecular doctor also started me on florinef, a fludrocortisone, to help with my low blood pressure. I have low sodium levels and postural hypotension and have had that for years. I would say that once a day (minimum) I used to get tunnel vision when I would stand up and get close to passing out. I used to have it down to an art: I could get up, walk, completely lose my vision and still be able to tell when I needed to sit back down before passing out. It was daily life for me and I thought it was normal.   :rolleyes:  I gotta say that it's nice not to have that any longer....

 

Now were my adrenals fatigued and not working properly over the last decade or was it something more serious? I still had postural hypotension after being gluten-free for a year so I doubt that caused it but who knows? I didn't give it a few years to wait and find out - too impatient.  LOL

 

The same doctor also started me cortef, a hydrocortisone, and to be honest, I can't remember his exact reasons for it but it did sure help when I had an autoimmune flare-up this winter - it was the mildest one I've had in years! Even so, my fasting glucose is getting high and I know that can affect it so I think it's time to revisit the need for that steroid. Plus my ACTH is now super low  so I think it's time to wean myself off of that.

Hi Nicole

 

Good advice to drop the DHEA.  Read Here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehydroepiandrosterone .  If at some point you need to increase your testosterone then there are prescription creams and you can take shots.

 

Florinef sounds good.  Read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fludrocortisone .  Treats Orthostatic Intolerance. 

 

About the Cortef.  It does surppress the immune system, that is why your flare was less intense, and does lower ACTH.  Read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortef .

 

What does your current Doc say about what the other Doc started you on.   You do need regular testing to get medication levels to there effective dosage with minimal effects.  It kinda sounds like you need more details about what med he is using to treat what issue, and is it long tern, short term.  Self dosing and guessing on your issues doesn't work.  You need specifics.  A good Endo is hard to find, just like a Celiac Doc but very important,  Some Endo's will medicate what is necessary to sustain life but not treat the underlying issues first and then setting up a maintenance plan.  I know Docs are hard to find up there so press your Doctor for details about your treatment.  When it comes to these drugs the side effects are a high price to pay if not done properly.

 

Take good care Nicole, your worth it!

 

Colleen

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Hi Nicole (nvsmoom),

 

Thanks for telling us your story.  More information certainly helps! :)  I had fainting spells for a while a few years back.  I would pass out sometimes sitting still in a chair, or almost pass out when standing out too.  In my case it turned out to be caused by soy.  Had the doctors do their tests and stuff, nuerologist, endo.  They couldn't find anything.  But I stopped eating soy and it cleared up.  Funny how these other food intolerances can affect some of us.

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I forgot to mention.  Most Endocrinologists use the term (Adrenal Insufficiency) for a medical diagnosis.

 

Colleen

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Hi Nicole

 

Good advice to drop the DHEA.  Read Here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehydroepiandrosterone .  If at some point you need to increase your testosterone then there are prescription creams and you can take shots.

 

Florinef sounds good.  Read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fludrocortisone .  Treats Orthostatic Intolerance. 

 

About the Cortef.  It does surppress the immune system, that is why your flare was less intense, and does lower ACTH.  Read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortef .

 

What does your current Doc say about what the other Doc started you on.   You do need regular testing to get medication levels to there effective dosage with minimal effects.  It kinda sounds like you need more details about what med he is using to treat what issue, and is it long tern, short term.  Self dosing and guessing on your issues doesn't work.  You need specifics.  A good Endo is hard to find, just like a Celiac Doc but very important,  Some Endo's will medicate what is necessary to sustain life but not treat the underlying issues first and then setting up a maintenance plan.  I know Docs are hard to find up there so press your Doctor for details about your treatment.  When it comes to these drugs the side effects are a high price to pay if not done properly.

 

Take good care Nicole, your worth it!

 

Colleen

 

Thanks for the links, Colleen.  :)

 

The endocrinology appointment I had was not for my adrenals or thyroid issues. It was set up for possible acromegaly. Up here you are only allowed to see a doctor for one reason/problem per visit. She made a few comments to me about my meds, and completely brushed off my mentions of hypoglycemia and shakes, and I am guessing it was because she needed to keep my visit to 15 minutes or so.

 

What she did say was that:

  • DHEA is not safe and can cause cancer. She told me to stop taking it and I have today.
  • She was unsure about my need for cortisol and was concerned that I had not had the "proper" testing done before being put on it. That sounds reasonable to me. She ordered anti-adrenal antibodies (21-Hydroxylase Antibodies) testing done, and is checking for Addison's... I told her I doubt I have Addisons but with my history of AI diseases, she is checking it out just to be safe. I am beginning to question the need for it myself.
  • For my fludricortisone, she asked if the previous doctor tested my BP while laying down and then upon standing to confirm the potural hypotension. I sadi yes, a few times, and from there she moved on.
  • She said my TSH is way too low and that will be hard on my bones. I am bigger boned than average and have the scans to prove it - LOL) so that doesn't worry me. I don't think doctors know what to do when  patient is on natural desiccated thyroid. Yes my TSH is low BUT my free T3 was well within range the last time I checked - that means I'm not hyperthyroid because I do not have too much T3 or T4.

I think that was the jist of it all.

 

I will be seeing the endo again sometime in January to find out more about the acromegaly issues and my other test results. I'll bring up my other issues then.

 

I will also go back to the old (orthomolecular) doctor who prescribed all this and pin down his plans for me. I was a bit of a wishy washy patient with him because he almost certainly is autistic (like a Dr House just not antogonistic, but not friendly either), and it's hard to get him to explain himself fully

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Hi Nicole (nvsmoom),

 

Thanks for telling us your story.  More information certainly helps! :)  I had fainting spells for a while a few years back.  I would pass out sometimes sitting still in a chair, or almost pass out when standing out too.  In my case it turned out to be caused by soy.  Had the doctors do their tests and stuff, nuerologist, endo.  They couldn't find anything.  But I stopped eating soy and it cleared up.  Funny how these other food intolerances can affect some of us.

 

Soy,eh? Hmmm.  I've had this hypotension since my late teen years. I wonder if there was some food that caused it. I'm pretty sure it wasn't gluten because it continued after i went gluten-free; although gluten certainly could have exacerbated it. I doubt it's soy as I ate it very infrequently. Could be something else... I almost wish I'd given it more time but after so many years, I jumped at the chance of a fast fix.

 

 

I wouldn't be surprised if there is something to this adrenal fatigue thing. Doctors are so often wrong about their theories, just think of the low fat diet prescribed in the 70-'s to 90's, which has now been proven to be detrimental to our health. And gluten and casein and autistic children? Celiacs without classic symptoms? Giving high carb and sugar food to cancer patients because they lose weight on chemo (when glucose is cancer's only food of choice)? I don't know. I bet there is something to it even though it is unproven at present.

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Hi Nicole,

 

I imagine other foods could cause the same reaction.  I can sure understand wanting to get a quick solution to the situation.  You could try an elimination diet  at some point to see if anything is causing reactions.  It might help.  That's how I figured out soy was causing my problem.

 

Here's a page talking about overdoing it on the selenium.  Personally, I started taking selenium a couple days ago after reading  Prickly's link and I am feeling much better.  That research study was about giving the people twice the RDA for selenium.  So maybe the RDA is wrong.

Brazil Nuts & Selenium: Are You Nuts If You Have More Than One Per Day? Putting the Toxicity Issue into Perspective

http://suppversity.blogspot.com/2013/07/brazil-nuts-selenium-are-you-nuts-if.html

 

Giving a little equal time to the othe side, here is mayo clinic's take on adrenal fatigue.  Looks like it is really depression or fibromyalgia.  Duh, I was so wrong!

Is there such a thing as adrenal fatigue?

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/addisons-disease/expert-answers/adrenal-fatigue/faq-20057906

 

Adrenal fatigue is a term applied to a collection of nonspecific symptoms, such as body aches, fatigue, nervousness, sleep disturbances and digestive problems. The term often shows up in popular health books and on alternative medicine websites, but it isn't an accepted medical diagnosis.

Your adrenal glands produce a variety of hormones that are essential to life. The medical term adrenal insufficiency, or Addison's disease, refers to inadequate production of one or more of these hormones as a result of an underlying disease.

Signs and symptoms of adrenal insufficiency include:

  • Fatigue
  • Body aches
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Low blood pressure
  • Lightheadedness
  • Loss of body hair

Adrenal insufficiency can be diagnosed by blood tests and special stimulation tests that show inadequate levels of adrenal hormones.

Proponents of the adrenal fatigue diagnosis claim this is a mild form of adrenal insufficiency caused by chronic stress. The unproven theory behind adrenal fatigue is that your adrenal glands are unable to keep pace with the demands of perpetual fight-or-flight arousal. As a result, they can't produce quite enough of the hormones you need to feel good. Existing blood tests, according to this theory, aren't sensitive enough to detect such a small decline in adrenal function — but your body is.

It's frustrating to have persistent symptoms your doctor can't readily explain. But accepting a medically unrecognized diagnosis from an unqualified practitioner could be worse. Unproven remedies for so-called adrenal fatigue may leave you feeling sicker, while the real cause — such as depression or fibromyalgia — continues to take its toll.

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Hi Nicole,

 

I imagine other foods could cause the same reaction.  I can sure understand wanting to get a quick solution to the situation.  You could try an elimination diet  at some point to see if anything is causing reactions.  It might help.  That's how I figured out soy was causing my problem.

 

Here's a page talking about overdoing it on the selenium.  Personally, I started taking selenium a couple days ago after reading  Prickly's link and I am feeling much better.  That research study was about giving the people twice the DA for selenium.  So maybe the RDA is wrong.

Brazil Nuts & Selenium: Are You Nuts If You Have More Than One Per Day? Putting the Toxicity Issue into Perspective

http://suppversity.blogspot.com/2013/07/brazil-nuts-selenium-are-you-nuts-if.html

 

Giving a little equal time to the othe side, here is mayo clinic's take on adrenal fatigue.  Looks like it is really depression or fibromyalgia.  Duh, I was so wrong!

Is there such a thing as adrenal fatigue?

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/addisons-disease/expert-answers/adrenal-fatigue/faq-20057906

 

Adrenal fatigue is a term applied to a collection of nonspecific symptoms, such as body aches, fatigue, nervousness, sleep disturbances and digestive problems. The term often shows up in popular health books and on alternative medicine websites, but it isn't an accepted medical diagnosis.

Your adrenal glands produce a variety of hormones that are essential to life. The medical term adrenal insufficiency, or Addison's disease, refers to inadequate production of one or more of these hormones as a result of an underlying disease.

Signs and symptoms of adrenal insufficiency include:

  • Fatigue
  • Body aches
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Low blood pressure
  • Lightheadedness
  • Loss of body hair

Adrenal insufficiency can be diagnosed by blood tests and special stimulation tests that show inadequate levels of adrenal hormones.

Proponents of the adrenal fatigue diagnosis claim this is a mild form of adrenal insufficiency caused by chronic stress. The unproven theory behind adrenal fatigue is that your adrenal glands are unable to keep pace with the demands of perpetual fight-or-flight arousal. As a result, they can't produce quite enough of the hormones you need to feel good. Existing blood tests, according to this theory, aren't sensitive enough to detect such a small decline in adrenal function — but your body is.

It's frustrating to have persistent symptoms your doctor can't readily explain. But accepting a medically unrecognized diagnosis from an unqualified practitioner could be worse. Unproven remedies for so-called adrenal fatigue may leave you feeling sicker, while the real cause — such as depression or fibromyalgia — continues to take its toll.

 

 

When my doctor started me on cortisol back in the late spring, he also had me taking about 165 mg of selenium (Selmet) per day. I guess he was on the ball for that one.

 

Man.. those symptoms are all so vague. I wish symptoms were clearer: Oh you have green spots? Must be adrenal insufficiency. Green spots only on the hands? Must just be adrenal fatigue. Oh, the spots are tourquoise? Must be celiac disease.  :rolleyes:

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Adrenal fatigue is a term applied to a collection of nonspecific symptoms, such as body aches, fatigue, nervousness, sleep disturbances and digestive problems. 

 

but, this sounds like fibromyalgia

and celiac

and NCGS

and  ME  (Myalgic Encephalopathy)

and CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome)

and hypothryoidism

 

and ,and, and ...

 

which was my whole point (but was lost in the snarkyfest).

 

self-diagnosing, self-medicating and self-supplementing...? not a good idea.  

 

IMHO IMHO IMHO IMHO IMHO IMHO (think I said it enough?)  :)

 

The endocrine system is more than one or two organs and they work in synergy. 

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I don't know what to think of the adrenal fatigue. I had undiagnosed celiac disease and thyroiditis for decades so I wouldn't be surprised if another organ had "issues".  An orthomolecular MD i saw noted my adrenals weren't where he wanted. He never actually used the phrase "adrenal fatigue" with me but he started me on some hormones, some of which I'm starting to question the need for.

 

My DHEA was near the bottom of the normal range. He started me on some to help it out and to raise my testosterone which was alos at the low end. U here in Alberta, DHEA is not considered a supplement and is available only through prescription.

 

I recently saw an endo for the first time (endos are almost impossible to see up here unless you have something lid=fe threatening or diabetes). The endo has told me to stop taking DHEA because it has been linked to cancer... I'm looking into this and trying to decide what to do. I'm guessing I'll drop it.

 

The orthomolecular doctor also started me on florinef, a fludrocortisone, to help with my low blood pressure. I have low sodium levels and postural hypotension and have had that for years. I would say that once a day (minimum) I used to get tunnel vision when I would stand up and get close to passing out. I used to have it down to an art: I could get up, walk, completely lose my vision and still be able to tell when I needed to sit back down before passing out. It was daily life for me and I thought it was normal.   :rolleyes:  I gotta say that it's nice not to have that any longer....

 

Now were my adrenals fatigued and not working properly over the last decade or was it something more serious? I still had postural hypotension after being gluten-free for a year so I doubt that caused it but who knows? I didn't give it a few years to wait and find out - too impatient.  LOL

 

The same doctor also started me cortef, a hydrocortisone, and to be honest, I can't remember his exact reasons for it but it did sure help when I had an autoimmune flare-up this winter - it was the mildest one I've had in years! Even so, my fasting glucose is getting high and I know that can affect it so I think it's time to revisit the need for that steroid. Plus my ACTH is now super low  so I think it's time to wean myself off of that.

DHEA is the hormone that all other hormones are derived from. It's the mother ship of hormones. Everyone has normal ranges for their age group and they do decline somewhat with age. I take 5 mg. of DHEA daily as mine was out of range low for my age. It's really important to be tested regularly for hormone levels when supplementing. I would imagine that if you took too much, then bad things could happen but DHEA is safe........as long as you don't overdo it and are tested for improvements.

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. It's really important to be tested regularly for hormone levels when supplementing. I would imagine that if you took too much, then bad things could happen but DHEA is safe........as long as you don't overdo it and are tested for improvements.

 

Wise woman.

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Thank you, IrishHeart! 

 

You don't mess around with hormones because any misuse of them can result in severe problems and even cancer. They are powerful entities and need to be monitored via bloodwork or saliva testing, in some instances.  I do think the term adrenal insufficiency is overused but hormone levels can be messed up and need tweaking from time to time.

 

If you want better cortisol levels in the morning, the best thing you can do is go to bed by 10:00pm because cortisol is made during sleep and only before midnight. I have low morning cortisol but it's partly my own fault because I am a night owl and don't get home from work until 7:00-7:30pm, so am not about to go to bed at 10:00pm. But by noon and especially during the afternoon hours, it rebounds and I have stellar cortisol levels.  I am never running off to the coffee pot at 3:00pm like everyone else around here as I do not slump in the afternoon. Slumping is a cortisol problem and then coffee is needed to stay awake.  It also is directly affected by what you eat for lunch andf most people around here eat the typical American lunch.....in other words, unhealthy, and they wonder why they are falling asleep by mid-afternoon.  You can't improve cortisol levels that are unbalanced by taking cortisol pills.  Those should only be used if you have all around low cortisol and then you might be close to having Addisons.

 

As far as thyroid function and adrenal insufficiency are concerned, pay closer attention to iron levels and stored iron because you will never gain good control of your thyroid if your iron is low.  I think too many problems are blamed on the adrenals.  Just beware of doctors who push too many supplements and claim it will correct everything. Very often, they don't.

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Ok, here's my progress report so far.  I was doing the DHEA and pregenelone creams every Mon Wed Fri.  Also the ginseng and Vitamin D cream.  Since I started taking some extra selenium I am feeling more like a person and am thinking the hormone creams aren't really helping a lot.  So I am going to stick with just the ginseng, selenium and vit D for awhile and see how that goes.  Maybe a little later I will write up more about my symptoms and how I came to the idea of adrenal fatigue.

I thought it would be good to post this list of adrenal fatigue symptoms from a site that believes it exists.  The Mayo clinic site list was pretty short and incomplete IMHO.  But that is not surprising since the author doesn't believe the condition exists.  He does believe in depression and fibromyalgia though, so he suggested those.

This list is from the About.com link that Prickly posted earlier.

http://thyroid.about.com/cs/endocrinology/a/adrenalfatigue.htm

Symptoms include:

    excessive fatigue and exhaustion
    non-refreshing sleep (you get sufficient hours of sleep, but wake fatigued)
    overwhelmed by or unable to cope with stressors
    feeling rundown or overwhelmed
    craving salty and sweet foods
    you feel most energetic in the evening
    a feeling of not being restored after a full night's sleep or having sleep disturbances
    low stamina, slow to recover from exercise
    slow to recover from injury, illness or stress
    difficulty concentrating, brain fog
    poor digestion
    low immune function
    food or environmental allergies
    premenstrual syndrome or difficulties that develop during menopause
    consistent low blood pressure
    extreme sensitivity to cold

I have seen similar lists on quite a few sites discussing adrenal fatigue, so it seems the Mayo clininc dr didn't want to consider those other symptoms in his review.  Or just didn't try very hard to find out what symptoms people were actually complaining about.  Is it any surprise the medical establishment doesn't recognize the condtion when they can't even bother to do a review of the actual symptoms reported by people?  The Mayo guy wasn't very close IMHO.

There are some interesting points about selenium on this site.  Selenium deficiencies are linked to thyroid issues, muscle weakness, heart disease, low fertility, white muscle disease.  Anyway, Se. is a critical nutrient in our bodies, and IMHO it may be the cause of some adrenal fatigue complaints.  The upper safe limit I saw listed was 400 mcg daily.  I am taknig around 200 mcg daily.

Thanks to everyone for contributing to this discussion.  It's already helped me physically, maybe it will help others too.

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/selenium/
 

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I realize that I'm late to the game, but here goes.

 

This is the source of the information:

 

"The Hormone Health Network is the nation’s endocrine patient education resource.  

We are committed to helping patients have more informed discussions with their health care providers about hormone health, disease, and treatment.  All of our educational resources are based on the clinical and scientific expertise of The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists, representing 16,000 physicians and scientists. 

The Network offers health care providers accurate, time-saving tools and gives patients the trusted information they need to better understand their conditions and treatment options.  Our goal is to positively impact the health and well-being of patients by moving them from educated to engaged, from informed to active partners in their health care."

 

http://www.hormone.org/hormones-and-health/myth-vs-fact/adrenal-fatigue

 

  • "“Adrenal fatigue” is not a real medical condition. There are no scientific facts to support the theory that long-term mental, emotional, or physical stress drains the adrenal glands and causes many common symptoms.
  • Adrenal insufficiency is a real disease diagnosed through blood tests.
  • There is no test that can detect adrenal fatigue.

Supplements and vitamins made to “treat” adrenal fatigue may not be safe. Taking these supplements when you don’t need them can cause your adrenal glands to stop working and may put your life in danger."

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I realize that I'm late to the game, but here goes.

 

This is the source of the information:

 

"The Hormone Health Network is the nation’s endocrine patient education resource.  

We are committed to helping patients have more informed discussions with their health care providers about hormone health, disease, and treatment.  All of our educational resources are based on the clinical and scientific expertise of The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists, representing 16,000 physicians and scientists. 

The Network offers health care providers accurate, time-saving tools and gives patients the trusted information they need to better understand their conditions and treatment options.  Our goal is to positively impact the health and well-being of patients by moving them from educated to engaged, from informed to active partners in their health care."

 

http://www.hormone.org/hormones-and-health/myth-vs-fact/adrenal-fatigue

 

  • "“Adrenal fatigue” is not a real medical condition. There are no scientific facts to support the theory that long-term mental, emotional, or physical stress drains the adrenal glands and causes many common symptoms.
  • Adrenal insufficiency is a real disease diagnosed through blood tests.
  • There is no test that can detect adrenal fatigue.

Supplements and vitamins made to “treat” adrenal fatigue may not be safe. Taking these supplements when you don’t need them can cause your adrenal glands to stop working and may put your life in danger."

 

Hi Steph.  Thank you for Posting this information.  I had basically said some of the same things but it was seemingly over looked on the thread.

 

Colleen

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I realize that I'm late to the game, but here goes.

 

This is the source of the information:

 

"The Hormone Health Network is the nation’s endocrine patient education resource.  

We are committed to helping patients have more informed discussions with their health care providers about hormone health, disease, and treatment.  All of our educational resources are based on the clinical and scientific expertise of The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists, representing 16,000 physicians and scientists. 

The Network offers health care providers accurate, time-saving tools and gives patients the trusted information they need to better understand their conditions and treatment options.  Our goal is to positively impact the health and well-being of patients by moving them from educated to engaged, from informed to active partners in their health care."

 

http://www.hormone.org/hormones-and-health/myth-vs-fact/adrenal-fatigue

 

  • "“Adrenal fatigue” is not a real medical condition. There are no scientific facts to support the theory that long-term mental, emotional, or physical stress drains the adrenal glands and causes many common symptoms.
  • Adrenal insufficiency is a real disease diagnosed through blood tests.
  • There is no test that can detect adrenal fatigue.

Supplements and vitamins made to “treat” adrenal fatigue may not be safe. Taking these supplements when you don’t need them can cause your adrenal glands to stop working and may put your life in danger."

 

 

Hi Steph.  Thank you for Posting this information.  I had basically said some of the same things but it was seemingly over looked on the thread.

 

Colleen

 

 

Me too!  Oh well...  All we can do is put out the info.  

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I don't think it was that your comments were overlooked, they just weren't agreed with.  ;)  I think that is a spot that we get the most arguments on this board - new health/scientific ideas that are not widely accepted. Ideas that are not proven true but not proven false either, and that's where I think adrenal fatigue falls. We can't prove it or disprove it yet.

 

To me adrenal insufficiency/fatigue makes sense to me because of how my thyroid failed.  My doctors claim I don't have Hashi's because my TPO Ab never quite went above the upper normal limit so it (supposedly) mostly stopped working on it's own... but it kept working at a high enough level that I functioned. That's sort of like comparing Addison's with adrenal insufficiency/fatigue, in my mind.

 

Also, My thyroid hormones never went below normal even when I was feeling very hypo and my TSH was high to prove it. I was "normal". It took a full replacement dose of thyroid meds to make me feel better even though I started from within the normal lab range.  Again, people with "normal" tested adrenal function might not be at their personal normal ideal range. That seems to be what my doctors think with me.

 

My 24hr cortisol, and aldosterone were lowish but still normal. Regardless of that fact, I tended to get faint from low blood pressure, especially when I got up, and I still had other symptoms like low body temp (but thyroid treated to normal), fatigue and such.  One of my doctors gave me cortisol, DHEA, and fludrocortisone to treat that... and it did make a difference.  He did make a mistake (in my opinion) in not testing me for Addison's but my new endo is doing that now.

 

I'm not sure how long he wants to keep me on those meds. Some have some seriously yuck side effects. I am hoping that I'll be off them in a year and this will be like the hypothyroid patient who goes gluten-free and suddenly finds that they need less thyroid meds. Hopefully this will be a boost I needed, a jump start, and then I'll be fine.

 

I know adrenal fatigue is not accepted, and I am doing a bit of a science experiment on myself, but I know that and am moving ahead anyways. It is sort of like NCGI was years ago; when I joined the board just a year and a half ago, NCGI was just starting to be accepted. Subclinical thyroiditis is another that is not always accepted but I lived it. The importance of food to our overall health is still poo-poo'ed by most doctors, and what they do know is often wrong. For example, my hubby was told to eat more carbs in the form of whole grains to lower his cholesterol - that's out of the 1990's and has been proven false in recent years but our doctor stated it with complete faith because it was "accepted".

 

I do like hearing your ideas and points of view, and I've learned much from you all, but I don't always agree with the message or info. What is right for one is not what is best for all. I love reading what you all have to say though.  :)

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Hi Steph.  Thank you for Posting this information.  I had basically said some of the same things but it was seemingly over looked on the thread.

 

Colleen

 

 

Me too!  Oh well...  All we can do is put out the info.  

 

The more voices for proven medicine the better.  I thought that it might help to show that the information came from " the clinical and scientific expertise of The Endocrine Society, the world’s largest organization of endocrinologists, representing 16,000 physicians and scientists."

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