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MarkInes

Signs of Celiac disease? Short 5th finger?

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Hi everybody! 

I was wondering when did you start noticing that it was Celiac disease, what was your first symptom? We just got back with the lab results from doctor and he confirmed that my 4yo son has Celiac disease and the doctor made a comment how we didn't notice that before because his pinky finger is so short compared to the others, and are not even (his left 5th finger is shorter than the right one). My right pinky finger is shorter too, but I never got tested. Should I? Anybody experienced same? Thanks! 

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56 minutes ago, MarkInes said:

Hi everybody! 

I was wondering when did you start noticing that it was Celiac disease, what was your first symptom? We just got back with the lab results from doctor and he confirmed that my 4yo son has Celiac disease and the doctor made a comment how we didn't notice that before because his pinky finger is so short compared to the others, and are not even (his left 5th finger is shorter than the right one). My right pinky finger is shorter too, but I never got tested. Should I? Anybody experienced same? Thanks! 

I haven't seen finger length on the list of reasons to test for Celiac.  But having a first degree relative with Celiac is a reason to be tested every few years.


 

 

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Never heard of the finger issues myself either odd one......

It is a mostly genetic disease, and a odd one at that is that the gene can stay dormant in someone for years then become activated due to various reasons. Regardless as mentioned first degree relatives should be tested. Celiac in some people is silent not showing any outward symptoms for years but doing damage internally. A lot of times symptoms show up gradually and progress in a way you do not consider them to be all that odd again til the damage is done or progresses to a level sufficient enough to grab your attention.

If anything if the rest if the house hold test positive or someone else in the house test positive it would be a better reasons to change the whole house over to gluten-free making it much easier to manage meals and prevent cross contamination with no gluten in the house. So worth checking, if your new to this I will go ahead and link the newbie 101 thread there is a huge learning curve with gluten-free and avoiding CC but becomes second nature after a few months. We suggest a whole foods diet, no dairy or oats in addition for the first few months to jump start the healing process and simply it. I will give a list of gluten free food alternatives, places to get foods/groceries online, and how to order by UPC into your local grocery store.

https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/

 


Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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I think that is just a clinical observation on his part.  I had a Cardiologist once ask me during an examination (executive wellness check), if I ever had a heart murmur.  I said no and asked why.  He said that he noticed that people with really straight backs tend to have heart murmurs.  My back was very straight.   I told him both my brothers have heart murmurs.  He asked if they needed a cardiologist.  He had three kids at Unversity at the same time!  ?

I have the smallest adult pinky anyone has seen.  (Measured during big family parties with a bunch of little kids and you do all kinds of silly things to entertain each other......) My hands are stubby and the rest of me is little too.  Stunting?  Who knows?  But I am happy to blame celiac disease!  

Encourage all first degree relatives to get tested even if symptom free.  Google it.  

Glad that you know how to treat your son.  Hope he recovers fast!  

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

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Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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3 hours ago, MarkInes said:

Hi everybody! 

I was wondering when did you start noticing that it was Celiac disease, what was your first symptom? We just got back with the lab results from doctor and he confirmed that my 4yo son has Celiac disease and the doctor made a comment how we didn't notice that before because his pinky finger is so short compared to the others, and are not even (his left 5th finger is shorter than the right one). My right pinky finger is shorter too, but I never got tested. Should I? Anybody experienced same? Thanks! 

Hi :)

This site almost always has the goods! Check this thread out:

It was first noted by an English Gastroenterologist and is known as Bralys sign!

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LOL I found a old poll someone did on this it is quite amusing, I looked at mine, my pinky on one hand is just below the ring finger top joint and my right hand it is 1/8th inch shorter. Odd things you never notice.

 


Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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Yup, short pinkies here.  

Anyone have a tall forehead?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23325442

Leonardo da Vinci meets celiac disease.

"Adults, but not children, with celiac disease show a forehead extension significantly greater than controls, but this test's specificity appears too low to be used in the screening of celiac disease."

Curiouser and curiouser...

 

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On 19.7.2017 at 2:02 PM, MarkInes said:

Hi everybody! 

I was wondering when did you start noticing that it was Celiac disease, what was your first symptom? We just got back with the lab results from doctor and he confirmed that my 4yo son has Celiac disease and the doctor made a comment how we didn't notice that before because his pinky finger is so short compared to the others, and are not even (his left 5th finger is shorter than the right one). I have a short fifth finger too, but I never got tested. Should I? Anybody experienced same? Thanks! 

I'm planing a health provision at my doctor's anyways. I'll talk to her about my son's examination at the hospital, too.
Actually I do not have any health issues, so I don't think that I have celiac. But I read that you should not live on a gluten free diet when you get tested. As with our son I'm now forced to cook glutenfree logically I'll eat a lot less gluten too. So I think it would make sense to pass the tests now. 

Better safe than sorry :)

Thanks for your answers. Best, MI
 

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Are pinkie fingers not short, lol? Hm, the only finger length science l've seen is based on hormonal influence.

 

Sex hormones in  the womb affecting the first and fourth finger. It can be correlated with certain conditions but not usually autoimmune.

 

The 'masculine' long ring finger in women can be more common in autistic women or women with ADHD, my ring is longer on both hands but l don't display anything overtly masculine or have those conditions. Sometimes it's also just genetic.

 

Maybe it would be interesting to see how many on the forum also have this.

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I suppose having short fingers, or one that's super short, could be a sign of stunted growth which could be a sign of Celiac, but I certainly have never heard of short pinkies as a sign of it. If you have short ones too it makes more sense to me that it's just a genetic trait, but who knows. I do have a pretty tall forehead, but so did my dad and his side of the family. We're all short, thin-haired, and big-foreheaded. Of course, a few of us do have Celiac so maybe they're onto something...

Regardless, yes! you should get tested along with the father and any other children. Celiac is inherited even if it skips a generation. It can be asymptomatic, or may not have been triggered yet. The earlier you find out, the better. You can also get genetic testing done to see if you or anyone else has the possibility of developing Celiac, so can watch for symptoms later in life.

For your little boy, he's catching it super early so as long as he stays gluten-free he'll grow up healthy without all the complications people with undiagnosed Celiac can develop through their lives. That's a good thing!

Get tested, and good luck!

 

 


~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.

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"Braly's Sign was first described in 1953 by an English Gastroenterologist, Dr James Braly. The majority of Celiac patients have a short 5th finger and this is Braly's Sign. (J Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 2000; volume 31 (Suppl.3):S29. NEJM, August 18, 1999). 
In short (pardon the pun), the tip of the 5th finger (pinkie finger) is shorter than the crease of the last joint of the 4th finger (ring finger)."
 

I had read about this and found it interesting, I was shocked as I am not the petite celiac at all. I stand 5'11" and am overweight with very long feet and hands. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that I, in fact,  had a positive Braly's sign.   I'm not sure how useful it is as a diagnostic sign, more of a "clue" I would think in presence of other indicators. 

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So because I have been obsessively thinking and reading about all things celiac lately, I mentioned this curious observation (and the forehead one which we both are entertained by!) to my celiac husband, and it happened to be while we were taking a snack break watching last week's Game of Thrones.

(Any other fans out there?)

We decided Little Finger (on the show) is probably such an a$# because he is an undiagnosed celiac, badly 'glutened,' with severe neurological/psychiatric complications.....

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