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DJFL77I

Antibody level correlates to immune response strength?

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Does a high antibody level mean that the immune response is stronger.

If one person has a 10 and another has a 170, does the person with the 170 have a much stronger immune response going on

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Not necessarily.  The immune response involves both B cells, which make antibodies, and T cells, which produce cytokines.  Cytokines are the molecules which lead to the feeling of: “I’ve been glutened.”  So the antibodies are only part of the immune response. Plus not all antibodies are equal.  Some bind more strongly to their target (higher “affinity”), so the total amount of antibody isn’t the only consideration.

Serum antibody levels have not been found to correlate well with degree of intestinal damage, either.

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My antibody levels dropped from 100+ to 13..   in about 4.5 months..     I feel much better than I did before diagnosis and noticed various things improved or went away completely..  even though my celiac is still on.. 

so there has to be a weaker immune response going on..

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I wanted to clarify but can’t seem to edit my post.  

Antibody levels can be strange.  I used to be responsible for antibody production in animals.  Even highly inbred lab animals gave very different responses to the same dose of antigen.  Then suddenly some animal’s antibody levels would go down, even with continued exposure to the antigen.

For an individual, using a test from the same manufacturer, changes in antibody level are likely to indicate changes in immune response. But celiac antibody tests aren’t approved by FDA to indicate degree of intestinal damage.  Some people can have low levels but still have a lot of damage. Some people have their antibody levels go down but do not feel better.

I”m glad that you DO feel better!

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1 hour ago, DJFL77I said:

Then what's the reason to check them?

It means the immune response is stopping when they're dropping?

Antibody tests are only approved by FDA to detect celiac disease, not to monitor progress on the gluten free diet.  Still lots of doctors use it to monitor progress and it does appear to be useful.  As a general rule, eating less gluten leads to lower antibody levels which means less chance of autoimmune damage.  

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DJFL,

You might find these research articles helpful.

https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/columbia-researchers-find-biological-explanation-wheat-sensitivity-0

Recently, IE just  this year....they have found out the difference between Celiac disease and NCGS.

But don't be surprised if it doesn't take another 10 years before this new research reaches the clinical level.

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

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