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psawyer

Gravy For Turkey

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Okay, it is a rare occasion--I'm starting a topic. :rolleyes:

Roast turkey with stuffing and gravy is a Christmas tradition in my family. We're playing host this year to my parents, my brothers, and their wives. (None of us have children.)

We have the stuffing worked out--no worries there.

We've always had trouble making a decent gluten-free turkey gravy. The consistency just does not come out right. If anyone has a recipe that they can share, or knows of a store-bought mix that is gluten-free, we would be grateful for it.

Thanks in advance.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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If all else fails, maybe you could try a reduction. I never had a turkey sauce, but from what I am imagining it sounds good. Has anyone tried that?

Do you think your family would mind a more watery sauce, if it's full of flavor?

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If all else fails, maybe you could try a reduction. I never had a turkey sauce, but from what I am imagining it sounds good. Has anyone tried that?

Do you think your family would mind a more watery sauce, if it's full of flavor?

I do a reduction with my turkey. It IS full of flavor, but slightly unpredictable.....hence my reluctance to recommend it.......

but, here's what I do.

Take the pan with the drippings in it. Remove any solids - they will burn.

Pour some gluten-free chicken broth in, and put the pan on high heat. Also, add a bit of water, and some white wine. Boil. Add some butter. Reduce. Add salt and pepper.

Then, if you want to thicken it a little, you can add some corn starch - already dissolved in water.

Pour into one of those gravy separators - what are they called? Where you can drain out the oil and keep the juice.

Um, that's the best I can do, Peter!!!!!!!!!!

some years, it's way better than others........but there's no telling why. :blink:

Good luck Peter!

Merry Christmas.

:)


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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I take the juice from the turkey, add a cornstarch/water mixture, and that's it. It always turns out great. :)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I use 2 parts cornstarch - 1 part gluten-free flour blend (not a bean one). Mix with water or broth and add in. Heat on Medium stirring frequently and then constantly once it starts to thicken until it comes up to a boil. Salt and pepper to taste. At Thanksgiving when we had 20 people and needed more gravy, we added chicken broth because there wasn't enough turkey juice/broth.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

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I make a roux with the pan drippings, butter and a flour substitute.

I used to use rice flour until I got a little tip from Patti last year about using potato starch (thanks Patti, best gravy I've ever made :D )

Ratio of butter to flour substitute is 1 to 1, I usually do about 6-8 tbsp of each.

Stir or whisk the flour/potato starch in with the buter and pan drippings over low-medium heat until the butter melts and the flour incorporates making a sort of paste, then stir in chicken broth slowly and a little at a time until it reaches the desired gravy consistency (usually about 4-6 cups of stock). Season with salt and pepper to taste.

The potato starch doesn't get lumpy or gritty/grainy like I had experienced with the rice flour.

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I made gluten free gravy for Turkey Day this year and it was DELICIOUS.

I made a rioux of 2 Tbs butter and 2 tbs rice flour. I mixed it well over medium heat until it was a paste and then we added the pan drippings. It had been a Turkey breast, not a full turkey, so we also added about 1 cup water and 1 packet of Herbox Chicken boullion.

SO YUMMY. Gluten eaters ate it too and loved it. :D

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Like Kbabe I made my own using Gluten Free Girl's recipe http://glutenfreegirl.blogspot.com/ and even the gluten-eaters couldn't tell it was gluten free. These are detailed instructions but if you know how to make a roux, you don't even need to read them.

GLUTEN-FREE GRAVY

1/4 cup unsalted butter

1/4 cup gluten-free flour*

2 cups chicken stock (or juices from the roasted turkey)

salt and pepper to taste

*Shauna uses sweet rice flour. I used a combination of 2 parts Bob


Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

"Great difficulties may be surmounted by patience and perseverance." Abigail Adams (1744-1818) 2nd First Lady of the United States

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Okay, it is a rare occasion--I'm starting a topic. :rolleyes:

My first thought was, "What!? Peter GIVES advice, he doesn't ASK for it!"

To answer your question, we use pan drippings, add some chicken bouillion cubes/powder and then add a sweet rice flour & water mix (shake well before adding). We usually add pepper, but I don't add salt since bouillion seems salty to me.

Knorr Veloutine is gluten-free and a really good thickener. There's no flavour to it. You can get it at any grocery near the Bisto or other powdered gravy mixes. It comes in white for white sauces or brown for dark gravies. You do need to add quite a bit of Veloutine though, but it never gets lumpy. We've been having gluten-free gravy at all the family events for two years and no one's complained yet. Well, not to my face anyway. :ph34r: I never use cornstarch, it always gets lumpy.


Linda, Mom to Ty (11 years old)

Ty was diagnosed by blood test June 7/05

biopsy Aug 11/05, diagnosis confirmed Aug 18/05

Mom, Dad and big brother Celiac-free.

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I use sweet rice flour to make gravy. Have to use olive oil if we need additional fat because of a dairy allergy. If you can have soy, you might try Road's End Organics golden gravy. It's good, but daughter can't have soy.

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I LOVE GRAVY! I never really made my own gravy before going gluten-free, but now i'm the pro :D I learned how to do it from Rachael Ray :lol: And I've tried it with cornstarch, but I really love it with featherlight flour mix! So good!


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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heh... I wonder if gravy is one of those things best learned "in person". I only had lumps, once, and that was using some variety of flour or something else. But I definitely saw it made at home a lot. there should be more "easy-access" cooking training. :)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I'm just curious why some of you say to avoid bean flour.

I made some "milk gravy" using garbanzo beans(chickpeas) and it turned out really good.

I roasted the beans and then ground them in my grain mill, so maybe that helped boost the flavor.

Just curious if that's the bean flour you're referring to?


Osteoporosis, and sacroiliac arthritis diagnosed 32 yrs of age.  Chronic low wbc, Severe constipation, Migraines, severe GERD, multiple miscarriages, Sjrogen's disease, positive ANA, thyroid nodules (hyperthryoid), fatty liver disease with elevated enzymes, low vitamin D, low protein, IBS, SIBO, Discoid lupus, mulitple food allergies and massive hair loss.  I left my career because I was too sick to keep working, and it was devastating because I couldn't apply for disability without a diagnosis.  My daughter was a preemie and she has Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD) and had a positive ANA and Rheumatoid Factor at 16 and now has been dx'd with Hashimoto's.

 

Allergic to:  corn, rice, beans, tomatoes, dairy.  Not diagnosed as celiac.

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