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Gentleheart

More About Dr. Kenneth Fine

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Did removing the foods suggested by EnteroLab make your family healthier? If yes, then for you the test is valid, if no, then for you the test is no more accurate than allergy testing (which is very inaccurate).

If I remember correctly, the only foods that came up on Dr Fine's test were gluten and soy. I found the IgG ELISA test helpful in removing those foods that came up and reintroducing them after a couple months off of them.

The thing that didn't come up on Dr Fine's testing that did on ELISA (both IgG and IgE) as well as muscle testing was dairy. It's not a big issue with me and I do eat it now but have cut back again aside from some butter and raw cheese. I do do better without the dairy but my symptoms aren't bad enough to make me want to give it up totally again........at least not yet.

Coming totally off the gluten did help us, but it wasn't the total answer. I've done alternative testing on my children (one of which was getting to the point of reacting to many, many foods. I had them go through a laser detox and now they don't have as many problems.

Dr Fine's work may be good for those who wouldn't go off gluten otherwise, but an elimination diet (or other diets similar) could probably give the same answers.....it'd just take longer. For my family, gluten was only one of the problems and if people don't get better just off gluten they need to remove other offending foods until they heal as well as finding answers to other health problems that may have cropped up. Leaky gut is tricky, imo.

If I had it to do over again, I would have just opted for the gene test and saved the money on the rest from Enterolab. I still believe what tests people choose to do is their own choice. I know many wouldn't agree with the muscle testing or anything like it, but it did help my family.

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The thing that didn't come up on Dr Fine's testing that did on ELISA (both IgG and IgE) as well as muscle testing was dairy. It's not a big issue with me and I do eat it now but have cut back again aside from some butter and raw cheese. I do do better without the dairy but my symptoms aren't bad enough to make me want to give it up totally again........at least not yet.

Well, it sounds like you tried a variety of test methods. Did they agree? Did some show positives that you think are wrong and others show negatives that you also think are wrong?

Maybe EL is no better or no worse than any other method.

The elimination diet is probably the only true answer, but, as you said, it takes a long time. My personal opinion is that whatever testing method you use, you should take those results as a place to start your elimination diet.

Laboratory tests are based on a population, and you are an individual.

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The elimination diet is probably the only true answer, but, as you said, it takes a long time. My personal opinion is that whatever testing method you use, you should take those results as a place to start your elimination diet.Laboratory tests are based on a population, and you are an individual.

Jess, I agree here and esp. with the each individual thing. I keep seeing this over and over here.

My problem is ........something agrees with me one month and then something will pop up again.

oye, it's a daily challange.........but I keep getting more and more info here and this individuals body keeps changing on me :D

Judy

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The elimination diet is probably the only true answer, but, as you said, it takes a long time. My personal opinion is that whatever testing method you use, you should take those results as a place to start your elimination diet.

Laboratory tests are based on a population, and you are an individual.

I agree. My personality would like quick possible answers to food intolerances and adding them back in after a time to see how it goes.

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I would amend this to say "all women who are, or may become pregnant". And still, it would be true whether or not you know you have Celiac or gluten intolerance or if you smoke or whatever.

Frankly, I think you're splitting hairs. You knew what I meant. Besides, if you're already pregnant it might already be too late to correct a folic acid deficiency.

http://grove.ufl.edu/~folic/ntds.html

neesee

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Aren't we ALL here for the same purpose- to get healthy or help someone we love get healthy? If the gluten-free diet helps, it helps. Gluten-intolerant or celiac.

As far as Dr Fine publishing his work- how many of us have doctors who have published? My GI, who is at one of the top hospitals in Boston and on the faculty at Harvard Med has published ONE article. One! And it's not even on celiac. Publishing at the level Dr Fine would have to publish is pretty involved- perhaps he's testing instead of publishing.

If he has helped you achieve a healthier diet and better health, great! If not, carry on until you find it! (BTW- I have NOT used Enterolab)

I just want people to be constructive- you can disagree with or CRITIQUE a poster, a doctor, a diet, a diagnosis. Your critique does not make you more correct than anyone else.

On to HEALTH!!!!!!!!!!

Mtndog,

I can understand what you're saying, but most doctors out there haven't created a completely new method of testing for a certain disease. Dr. Fine is making serious claims about what he has accomplished, but refuses to go through the process of peer review. I have a doctor who is on the cutting edge of a certain kidney disorder that I have. He publishes all the time, so to further advance the knowledge of the subject. He has even included me in some of his trials and articles. That's what a doctor does when he's interested in advancing and revolutionalizing an area of medicine. Dr. Fine has no intention of being one of those doctors. With the claims Dr. Fine has made, he doesn't have the luxury of the normal obscurity that most doctors have. He has a duty to publish, for the sake of his patients and the medical community.

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Read all these posts since last night, and remembered something else Dr Fine said at the meeting in Memphis a few years ago. He gave statistics of the gene testing being positive of at least one of the genes(DQ2,DQ8 and several others) in nearly 90-95% of the population that he has tested. He was questioned as to whether he meant we were all basically celiac-prone, and he agreed. Can't quite believe that one.

He did have some interesting points showing a concordance with other autoimmune diseases and celiac, but I'm not sure it was his original thought. He mostly used his own slides from his own research .

He also offered a wide variety of tapes,books,etc..for sale that day,along with his music .

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Read all these posts since last night, and remembered something else Dr Fine said at the meeting in Memphis a few years ago. He gave statistics of the gene testing being positive of at least one of the genes(DQ2,DQ8 and several others) in nearly 90-95% of the population that he has tested. He was questioned as to whether he meant we were all basically celiac-prone, and he agreed. Can't quite believe that one.

He did have some interesting points showing a concordance with other autoimmune diseases and celiac, but I'm not sure it was his original thought. He mostly used his own slides from his own research .

He also offered a wide variety of tapes,books,etc..for sale that day,along with his music .

That makes sense if you look at this from an evolutionary standpoint. Very few, if any, predator animals, which are basically what humans are, eat grains. Our genetic makeup is better suited to handling what we would eat if we were still in the wild - meat, fish, eggs, fruit, nuts, some vegetable matter. So it makes sense that most of our populations have the genetic makeup that is sensitive to gluten and other grains and legumes like corn, soy, and so on. Populations in areas that developed the farming of grains, either suffered from their exposure (there is a good deal of evidence for this - shorter stature, poor dental health, etc. after the agricultural revolution) or slight mutations in these genes helped them survive better and pass on the ability to digest gluten better. These folks would be few and far between. (Isn't there some evidence that only DQ4 is really able to handle gluten?)

I could go on all day about the evolutionary aspects of this problem. I am more and more convinced that humans are not really suited to eating grains and legumes in general, though I am only willing to give up gluten (and dairy) at this point in my life. :P

As far as Dr. Fine selling tapes and books, he owns a commercial business as do many doctors these days. So why not? He makes no secret of the fact that he owns a business based on gluten intolerance. He advertises his prices clearly and there is no pressure after you get the tests to buy anything else from him. That doesn't make him any less of a doctor or a charlatan, just like prescribing medicines promoted commercially on TV or by persistent salepeople does not make any other doctor a charlatan, even though some of those meds turn out to be hazardous and pulled from the market. He is just a person who has gone against the mainstream of the medical community and I say thank goodness for that. He offers an alternative to a close-minded medical standard that has refused to even recognize gluten-intolerance until just recently and even then only the very few who bother to keep up with science advances. Good for Dr. Fine and beneficial to many of us.

Laurie

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I think that the expectation to publish, and the resulting idea that somehow, Dr. Fine is less credible for not having published, is based on our current medical system.

We here know all about the flaws of our current medical system. Many here would not have been diagnosed through that system. Far worse, many here were branded as either IBS, hypochondriacs, or demented, and given all kinds of medications that did nothing (obviously ) for a gluten reaction, but did have all kinds of side effects.

That doesn't make Dr. Fine any more or less credible than any of us believe. My point is that those who are judging his credibility based on the publishing (or lack thereof) seem to believe in the system.

He may or may not be credible. I don't know. Really, neither do any of us. But I've lost all faith in the system, at least as far as gluten-caused problems go. (I do, however, continue to respect the Emergency/Trauma arm of our medical system, at least, for the most part.) And I'm certainly not going to base any assumptions about his credibility on whether or not he's published in this country.

Notice that many of the studies linking gluten with non-intestinal problems are done in Italy and India--far from the control of the US pharmaceutical giants.

Notice, also, that the assumption is that thyroid problems can cause high TtG. Hello--we KNOW that gluten intolerance/celiac can CAUSE thyroid problems.

Some will say, "Oh, they appear together, doesn't mean one causes the other." But others will note that their thyroid problems (as well as other problems) disappeared on a gluten-free diet.

So the criticism that the tests aren't valid because other things can cause high TtG is awfully iffy at best--it could be the reverse, that those other things are actually further evidence of gluten problems!

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I think that the expectation to publish, and the resulting idea that somehow, Dr. Fine is less credible for not having published, is based on our current medical system.

We here know all about the flaws of our current medical system. Many here would not have been diagnosed through that system. Far worse, many here were branded as either IBS, hypochondriacs, or demented, and given all kinds of medications that did nothing (obviously ) for a gluten reaction, but did have all kinds of side effects.

That doesn't make Dr. Fine any more or less credible than any of us believe. My point is that those who are judging his credibility based on the publishing (or lack thereof) seem to believe in the system.

He may or may not be credible. I don't know. Really, neither do any of us. But I've lost all faith in the system, at least as far as gluten-caused problems go. (I do, however, continue to respect the Emergency/Trauma arm of our medical system, at least, for the most part.) And I'm certainly not going to base any assumptions about his credibility on whether or not he's published in this country.

Notice that many of the studies linking gluten with non-intestinal problems are done in Italy and India--far from the control of the US pharmaceutical giants.

Notice, also, that the assumption is that thyroid problems can cause high TtG. Hello--we KNOW that gluten intolerance/celiac can CAUSE thyroid problems.

Some will say, "Oh, they appear together, doesn't mean one causes the other." But others will note that their thyroid problems (as well as other problems) disappeared on a gluten-free diet.

So the criticism that the tests aren't valid because other things can cause high TtG is awfully iffy at best--it could be the reverse, that those other things are actually further evidence of gluten problems!

Good points. I agree with most of this.

I can see both sides because I was diagnosed with celiac but my son (and my sister and brother) were not. My son wouldn't go gluten-free without some "proof" and his dad nixed the endoscopy because of the risks. So I was between a rock and a hard place. I spent my own money willingly on Enterolab to get proof for my son. I almost just did the gene test but did the rest anyway. I wanted my son to have a positive stool test (even if it's later proved an inaccurate method) JUST to convince him to go gluten-free. The fact that he has a celiac gene and a gluten-intolerant gene is the convincing part, in my mind. Going DF/CF based on his results is only common sense, because he gets terrible stomach pain from any dairy, but that was a plus too. And his malabsorption of fat numbers were sky-high, which helps him understand why he is not gaining weight and why he is borderline and/or deficient in many vitamins/minerals.

So all in all, it was money well spent and I don't care if Dr. Fine has published or that another doctor doesn't believe it. It convinced my son to be very strict gluten-free/DF. After he finishes growing, he can decide whether or not to do a gluten challenge followed by an endoscopy.

My blood test was negative (diagnosed by accident via endoscopy), so was my son's, so was my sister's and my brother's. My brother went gluten-free but since he doesn't have "proof" from the medical community, he occasionally cheats and "scapes off the breading from the chicken". This might be worse, IMHO, than not going gluten-free at all, since he is still getting damage but not enough to convince him to be strict and rendering future blood tests inaccurate.

Until mainstream medicine comes up with an easy and/or non-invasive, fool-proof diagnosis tool that has no false negatives, I think Enterolab provides a good service. It's not perfect but neither is mainstream medicine. However, I totally understand how some folks don't approve of Enterolab and have no resentment towards anyone on this board, regardless of their choices. And I hope that in that spirit, we can all be good to one another.

~Laura

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Wow. I have been away from the board for quite some time. Imagine how surprised I was to see the long thread that grew from my simple original innocent question.

I have unfortunately not been visibly helped from going gluten, casein and soy free. It is always possible that something good may have been happening on the inside, but my health remains very poor outwardly at least and I still remain unwell most every day. I'm sorry to give such a discouraging report. But I must be honest.

Dr. Fine and Enterolab changed my life. I believed what they told me and have followed this lifestyle to the letter for years now. I even paid for extra counseling with them, asked repeatedly about Dr. Fine's publishing plans, did follow up tests and chose to trust them through everything. I admit to sometimes wondering, but I'm a loyal, patient person and have hung in there.

They changed my life because suddenly becoming gluten, casein and soy intolerant in a family of "normal" people who see no evidence has made me an outcast. I never eat out with the family. I eat my own food that I bring for myself at every family event. I can't participate in special occasions that include eating, so I choose to either not go or manage to wander around in hallways until the meal is over. Otherwise I am sitting at the table answering scores of questions about why I'm bringing my own cold food to a fancy catered wedding. Cooking at home requires preparing dual meals every day - one for me and one for everyone else. I'm ALWAYS a problem and it has been very lonely.

Don't misunderstand me. IF I indeed was feeling great as many of you do after making these lifestyle changes, it would be absolutely, totally worth it all. But for me, it has been a discouraging journey. That is why I have not been on the board. I feel like a person who doesn't belong anywhere anymore. Dr. Fine tells me that I am definitely gluten, casein and soy intolerant. I have the genes, the antibody reactions and I have the malabsorption. But doctors tell me I'm definitely NOT because blood tests show absolutely nothing, I am not clinically deficient in any nutrient they can detect and they see no need to do further invasive testing. I can't tell you how many times I have been tempted to just stop, rejoin the world and go back to normal. But I am honestly afraid of what might happen now after being gluten free for so long.

So if Dr. Fine is not legitimate or honest, then I have given up a lot of joy for nothing. If I have other problems which are contributing to my continuing ill health and the gluten intolerance is honestly a part of my puzzle, then I am grateful to have found it out at least. Otherwise, I have been royally taken.

This is why it is so important for Dr. Fine to say something. Surely they must be watching this forum. Surely they must know how many people are basing their entire lives on his findings. How a person lives is hugely impacted by a gluten intolerant diagnosis. It's easier for some than others, but it's still a very BIG DEAL. I wish we could all communicate with Dr. Fine and his staff together as a group to ask them to please clarify themselves once and for all. We have all made them a lot of money. If what they are selling is true, then it is well earned and they deserve our gratitude and every bit of the money they've made. If not, then it must stop. I have no bias either way, because I just don't know the truth.

I am very happy for those on this board who make these changes and get their lives back. Isn't that absolutely wonderful?! Even if it didn't work for me, I think it is fantastic that people have a place to go for support like this. That makes it even more important that everyone works together to make sure all the sharing stays as close to the truth as they can keep it. Since we are his loyal customers, I believe Dr. Fine owes us the courtesy of an explanation. He may be a fine, fine man (no pun intended). But he needs to speak up.

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IF I indeed was feeling great as many of you do after making these lifestyle changes, it would be absolutely, totally worth it all. But for me, it has been a discouraging journey. That is why I have not been on the board. I feel like a person who doesn't belong anywhere anymore. Dr. Fine tells me that I am definitely gluten, casein and soy intolerant. I have the genes, the antibody reactions and I have the malabsorption. But doctors tell me I'm definitely NOT because blood tests show absolutely nothing, I am not clinically deficient in any nutrient they can detect and they see no need to do further invasive testing. I can't tell you how many times I have been tempted to just stop, rejoin the world and go back to normal. But I am honestly afraid of what might happen now after being gluten free for so long.

Gentleheart, don't give up. I have been gluten free for over 8 yrs now, and I have never felt great either. The problem for me, and maybe you, is, I was sick for so long before finding out about gluten. Well over 20 yrs, and doctors gave me so many bogus diagnoses. Imagine, how can a body handle all that, for so many years. Going gluten free is the road to recovery. It took many, many years to get where we were, we can't expect to heal overnight. And, yes, enough is enough. It's time for us to feel good too. As a whole, I do feel 75% better than before going gluten-free. I rarely have diarrhea anymore, my tummy doesnt get upset unless one of my intolerance's slip through. My neuropathy, I am working on, and it is slowly getting better, I think. I do have balance problems from it, yet some of my tingling and burning is gone. My carpal tunnel is better. I am dealing with my sleep apnea now, and gaining on it too.

Keep working at it.

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I am a little puzzled over why some seem to think that Dr. Fine makes a lot of money off of these tests. These are not cheap tests to run. He farms out the DNA to other labs (Red Cross, etc.) and I am sure most of that fee goes to them. The other stool tests are not expensive, knowing what I do about proper lab procedures and expense of equipment. Certainly, if he wanted to make lots of money, he would publish results and then he could charge exorbitant amounts for these tests because insurance would cover them. I think a $400 fee for these tests are cheap compared to the fees that are charged for the more standard and apparently often inaccurate blood tests. (Did anyone catch House last night and the reference to the blood test for celiac that he said was often inconclusive? Lots of other inaccuracies about celiac - he referred to it as a wheat allergy at some point - but interesting that it made the show at all). Anyway, unless anyone has seem the business or IRS records of Dr. Fine and can prove that he is making boatloads of money off of gluten intolerant patients, I don't think we should be claiming that about him. And why do we assume he is watching this board? Has there been evidence of that in the past?

Gentleheart, I am so sorry that this has not proven the answer for you. I really haven't run into the type of social problems that you have following a gluten/casein free diet. I usually just don't make an issue of it, and no one seems to notice. Or I mention that I don't eat gluten, and no one questions it. I generally do not take my own food - I either eat beforehand or find something there that is safe - if you fill your plate with salad, everyone thinks you are on a diet :rolleyes: I hope you can find what is wrong and you can enjoy good health in the years to come. Even if you had positive tests for gluten, casein, and soy, there may be other problems as well, or your poor immune system is overwhelmed and doesn't know how to react any more. Hang in there!

Laurie

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Gentleheart, have you looked into the possibility that your food intolerances might be caused by something else, like a bacterial gut infection or Lyme Disease? I don't know enough about candida to know if that could cause food intolerances, but there do seem to be a lot of people on this board who have dealt with it; they might be able to point you towards a (non-Enterolab)way to diagnose that, if it exists.

Check out www.lunchinabox.net--the blogger there has a hubby who was gluten-free (after being biopsy-diagnosed as celiac)for many months with no improvement. He then went to a celiac center, who noticed his blood work showed no antibodies, and further testing revealed that he had an unusual bacterial infection of the gut, which was cured by antibiotics.

You've probably already checked out the Lyme thread here; last I checked, many of the people on that thread were experiencing dramatic improvement after treatment for Lyme.

Vaccines are another source of major problems for gut and body. Those in poor health are urged to get flu shots, pneumonia shots, shingles vaccines, and tetanus boosters.

The tetanus booster, I understand. However, many doctors are just giving a DPT (Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus) instead of a tetanus-only booster. The shingles vaccine, AFAIK, is not proved to be either safe or effective, and the flu shot's boasts of effectiveness is strongly tainted by skewed studies.

ALL of them contain adjuvants (chemicals to provoke a stronger immune system response so that they can use a weakened or killed virus); there are no long-term studies indicating safety of ANY of the adjuvants they use. There is a very logical theory that the high number of peanut-allergic children is due to the use of an adjuvant in infants' vaccines that was derived from peanut oil. Aluminum is another eyebrow-raising adjuvant.

And the common flu shot contains 25 micrograms of thimerosal. If, like many of us, you are unable to properly excrete mercury from your body, it will accumulate--and yearly flu shots will put you way over the EPA limit on mercury exposure.

Dental amalgams (those silver-colored fillings) are also made from mercury, and for some people are a big source of trouble. Unfortunately, REMOVING them can cause even more trouble,as it is difficult to control mercury vapor.

Anyway, my point here is that you may very well indeed have food intolerances--but something is causing them, and that something might also be causing your symptoms. The intolerances might be there, but not causing symptoms.

You might contact Ursa Major, if she is still here; she is very knowledgeable about multiple food intolerances.

I do wonder how you are not clinically deficient in anything if you have malabsorption, but maybe some of the more knowledgeable people here can answer that one. Hmmm--thyroid problems, possibly, or adrenal fatigue syndrome? Would a totally grain-free diet help? Or night-shade free? (Grasping at straws, here...)

I'm very sorry to hear that you are still having problems, and I hope you are able to find answers and feel better very soon!

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Perhaps I am missing something here, but Dr. Fine is published.

I am a medical librarian. It took all of 30 seconds, doing a quick search at Pubmed.gov to discover he has 30 articles to his credit dating back to 1991 in highly respected medical journals. He has not published since 2001, but that would not be unusual for someone who transitioned from an academic setting to a private practice or business setting.

I was able to verify all of his publications listed on his website:

https://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Frame_Cirrculum.htm

By the way, I was not diagnosed via his lab nor self-diagnosed. A gastroenterologist diagnosed me using all the standard tests including genetic testing and a biopsy.

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I am a little puzzled over why some seem to think that Dr. Fine makes a lot of money off of these tests. These are not cheap tests to run. He farms out the DNA to other labs (Red Cross, etc.) and I am sure most of that fee goes to them. The other stool tests are not expensive, knowing what I do about proper lab procedures and expense of equipment. Certainly, if he wanted to make lots of money, he would publish results and then he could charge exorbitant amounts for these tests because insurance would cover them. I think a $400 fee for these tests are cheap compared to the fees that are charged for the more standard and apparently often inaccurate blood tests. (Did anyone catch House last night and the reference to the blood test for celiac that he said was often inconclusive? Lots of other inaccuracies about celiac - he referred to it as a wheat allergy at some point - but interesting that it made the show at all). Anyway, unless anyone has seem the business or IRS records of Dr. Fine and can prove that he is making boatloads of money off of gluten intolerant patients, I don't think we should be claiming that about him. And why do we assume he is watching this board? Has there been evidence of that in the past?

Gentleheart, I am so sorry that this has not proven the answer for you. I really haven't run into the type of social problems that you have following a gluten/casein free diet. I usually just don't make an issue of it, and no one seems to notice. Or I mention that I don't eat gluten, and no one questions it. I generally do not take my own food - I either eat beforehand or find something there that is safe - if you fill your plate with salad, everyone thinks you are on a diet :rolleyes: I hope you can find what is wrong and you can enjoy good health in the years to come. Even if you had positive tests for gluten, casein, and soy, there may be other problems as well, or your poor immune system is overwhelmed and doesn't know how to react any more. Hang in there!

Laurie

Thanks for the kind encouragement everyone. I honestly don't try to make a big deal out of being guten free. I'm usually very quiet about it. But because of my multiple allergies it just gets frustratingly complicated sometimes. When you are tired and don't feel especially good, it's hard to ALWAYS plan way ahead and ALWAYS be so different, ALL the time. Many, many other people have similar and much worse burdens in life to deal with. So there is certainly no time for any self pity here. I'm sorry if I came across that way.

I don't know how labs work, so I did make an assumption that it was a profitable venture. Prices are usually put in place to make money. I assumed Dr. Fine's team was attempting to be profitable like everyone else. And there's nothing wrong with that. I firmly believe that if a valuable service is being rendered, they absolutely deserve every penny they are making. I guess my point was that if Dr. Fine's team KNOWS that so many of us are having persistent questions and doubts, it might be WISE to address those fears since we ARE his customer base. Countless testimonies in their favor are on this board every week. You couldn't buy that much advertising. I think that's worth a little free communication from them now and then. Don't you?

I did make another assumption. I have to believe that Dr. Fine and his team are extremely intelligent and know a ton about this subject. I do know for a fact that they are aware of this forum because I personally informed them all about it. So I guess I just assumed that they would be quietly, invisibly checking in once in awhile to see what's being said and maybe even sharing occasionally or posting some new information on their own site as a result. Wouldn't you? I sure would. From my personal observation, their site hasn't changed or added any significant information in at least 3 years that I have noticed. I was told it was because Dr. Fine was so busy trying to finish his research so it could be published. They told me that MANY times. I still have faith in them. Like I said, they just need to speak up. We're listening.

And yes, Dr. Fine is a published physician. But his other articles aren't necessarily on this specific subject and it has been 7 years since anything new has appeared. Being the brilliant man that he is and since he is still very much doing groundbreaking research on a daily basis, that just seems odd to me.

I too have wondered about the malabsorption thing. I tested at severe twice through Enterolab and it is supposedly worsening. But when my medical doctor did tests, I had no particular nutritional deficiencies. I can't figure that one out either. Sure scared me, though.

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Perhaps I am missing something here, but Dr. Fine is published.

I am a medical librarian. It took all of 30 seconds, doing a quick search at Pubmed.gov to discover he has 30 articles to his credit dating back to 1991 in highly respected medical journals. He has not published since 2001, but that would not be unusual for someone who transitioned from an academic setting to a private practice or business setting.

I was able to verify all of his publications listed on his website:

https://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Frame_Cirrculum.htm

By the way, I was not diagnosed via his lab nor self-diagnosed. A gastroenterologist diagnosed me using all the standard tests including genetic testing and a biopsy.

He has not published data that supports his gluten intolerance stool testing or genes-that is the concern here.

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(Did anyone catch House last night and the reference to the blood test for celiac that he said was often inconclusive? Lots of other inaccuracies about celiac - he referred to it as a wheat allergy at some point - but interesting that it made the show at all).

I watch "House" all the time, and yeah, I saw the show last night. He didn't say that celiac disease and a wheat allergy were one in the same. He said, it could be one or the other. I found the show very interesting, even though the patient didn't have celiac. After the who, I switched to the USA network and watched a rerun of "House". In this show, celiac came up again, and I know for a fact, one season they actually diagnosed a celiac. I think it's wonderful that they are bringing attention to the disease, even if the show is fiction. :lol:

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I was tested several years ago by Dr. Fine, and at that time, he told me by email that he planned to publish his research in the near future. After reading the mesages on this board about him in recent weeks, I sent him an email last week in which I reminded him of his promise many years ago, and asked when I could expect to see his research. I promptly received the following reply:

"DR. FINE IS CURRENTLY WORKING ON HIS RESEARCH AND HAS TOLD US TO EXPECT THE REPORT SOMETIME EARLY NEXT YEAR. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS BEFORE THEN, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US ONCE MORE. WE ARE ALWAYS MORE THAN HAPPY TO SEE THAT THIS INFORMATION IS IN HIGH DEMAND. THANK YOU, ALEXIS CARREON, ENTEROLAB CUSTOMER SERVICE."

Does anyone out there think we will see Dr. Fine's research published early next year? If it does not appear, I will send another inquiry next summer.

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"DR. FINE IS CURRENTLY WORKING ON HIS RESEARCH AND HAS TOLD US TO EXPECT THE REPORT SOMETIME EARLY NEXT YEAR.

Well, this is not surrprising at all...isnt this the exact same statement we've been hearing for years now?

This was my point in the recent thread on this same topic...I personally do not feel that its right for Dr. Fine to lead people to believe that he is about to publish....when it seems quite obvious that he's not. I do not necessarily need to see him publish for peer review.....as I do have faith in other doctors who have not published. However, since Dr. Fine seems to make claims that he does not back up, nor does he attempt to follow through on his word.....it really makes me question the validity of his testing as well as his motives.

Why does he feel the need to keep repeating the same statement year after year? Is it because he feels that he will sell more tests if we believe that he is about to publish? I do feel that for many people who are unsure....the belief that he will publish for peer review makes the test seem more valid....and they are more likely to purchase the test based on this belief. I know that it was certainly a factor in my own decision more than 3 years ago.

As stated in the other thread....he has had no difficulties publishing other material in the past. When it comes to publishing with regards to his stool test....it is just not happening.

No....I do not believe that we will see him publish early next year.....or even the year after that. I do not believe that he will make as much money off of these tests if he publishes for peer review.....and that is because I do not think that his method of testing will prove to be valid.

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Well said Rachel! His statements about publishing influenced my decision to buy the test as well. He's been saying he's about to publish for years, and it's getting to be ridiculous at this point. It's a very good point that he has had no trouble publishing other things. He just can't seem to get around to publishing the data on the stool tests though. I wonder why...maybe because he knows it won't stand up to scrutiny...and that's not good for test sales. It's becoming evident what Dr. Fine is really up to.

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I hate to keep repeating this. But for those of us who innocently/unfortunately did not get conventional medical testing done before going gluten free and whose subsequent only clinical evidence of gluten intolerance is from enterolab's testing and who also may not even have easily recognizable symptoms to go by, Dr. Fine's integrity or lack of it is a mighty big deal. A lot is riding on his research being true and him being honest. At least for me it is.

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I hate to keep repeating this. But for those of us who innocently/unfortunately did not get conventional medical testing done before going gluten free and whose subsequent only clinical evidence of gluten intolerance is from enterolab's testing and who also may not even have easily recognizable symptoms to go by, Dr. Fine's integrity or lack of it is a mighty big deal. A lot is riding on his research being true and him being honest. At least for me it is.

Precisely the point, Gentleheart......I believe it is very reasonable to go gluten-free AFTER all available conventional testing is negative, and there is nowhere else to turn when it appears you have celiac disease. Some people may never test with positive results, but still have it. Why not be gluten-free for 6 months to a year and then test for Enterolab if you wanted to pay $400 cash? You are still in a catch-22 as far as traditional medicine is concerned.....and if you are solidly gluten free, only the genetic testing should be positive,right? Any thoughts on this? Of course, you shouldn't tip off Enterolab what you have done!!!!

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