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AliB

Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD)

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This diet is set up to heal food intolerances by healing the gut. :) Not true food allergies. If you are IgE allergic to eggs, you musnt ever eat them. Im not allergic to eggs. I have been tested by skin prick and ELISA and both were NEG.

I have not noticed any side effects to eating the muffins. I think my stuffiness is due to seasonal allergies. I get em every Fall. So I will eat some eggs, but not overdo it.

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Anyone else ever tried fasting?

Hi Ali,

in some way I did try. At the age of 14 (24 years ago) I already had huge problems - nausea after everything I eat except raw fruit, veggies, natural yoghurt and peanuts. It was a difficult tiime, too, because my father was very ill and my mom got alcoholic, so I was fed up one day with being upset with my mom and having nausea all the time above all. Angrily I told myself to best stop eating - so one problem might be solved. And it was solved - I felt incredibly well for some time, only that of course one day I started feeling completely exhausted because I already was thin when I started fasting... But I always repeated this experience every now and then when the problems got too bad, and it used to keep me going for another couple of months afterwards. People thought I was anorectic, of course, and no doc came to the brillant idea that I wasn't ill because I was fasting but I was fasting because I felt ill...

By the way I saw the GE yesterday who is a very nice lady. Funny enough, without ever having heard about Elaine's book and the SCD, she told me exactly what Elaine says in her book! About wrong bacteria overwhelming the normal flora, not being able to fight candida because of that and feeding the wrong flora with the undigested carbohydrates in the gut. And she told me it was no wonder I had three great months with no symptoms at all after I took the antibiotic in April: The antibiotic I took happened to be a very broad one that kills absolutely everything - so it killed the bacteria in the kidneys and accidentally the bad guys in the gut, too! But continuing eating carbs of course I recultivated the bad guys - because my gluten free diet was not completely gluten free! I didn't realise that I was using soy sauce which contains WHEAT all the time! Now I'll have some new blood and stool tests and a biopsy (which I never had so far) so I know where I am - and then I only have to follow the SCD consequently and patiently. I'm so glad!

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...I don't know that the eggs can go and the baked good survive!

I have an observation about eggs though. If egg is one of the top allergens - how does it make the okay list in this diet? I am kind of surprised at that and wondering how that ends up being okay? Perhaps the answer lies in the fact that this diet is not being set up for people with food allergies, but other issues - where eggs aren't generally a problem.

Sometimes it's not a real egg allergy but a sensitivity brought on by the leaky gut or whatever damage has been done to the gut. Some people need to avoid eggs forever, but many after being on SCD for weeks or months are able to bring egg back into their diet.

I am egg intolerant but seem to be able to handle a little egg in baked goods or in mayonnaise, because one piece or bit of the whole has only a small portion of egg. I am hopeful that eventually I'll be able to tolerate an occassional whole egg, but if I can manage to bake with egg I will be very happy.

There are egg substitutes for even almond flour muffins. pecanbread site lists some egg substitutes and has a recipe for eggless muffins (I haven't tried yet be am going to soon - I'm not up to almond flour yet on the diet).

I've never been a huge fan of eggs for breakfast, preferring meats and rice (which is now out) but green beans are also a favorite. And that pumpkin pie porriage has become my current all time favorite.

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Hi Ali,

in some way I did try. At the age of 14 (24 years ago) I already had huge problems - nausea after everything I eat except raw fruit, veggies, natural yoghurt and peanuts.

Shay - thanks for the clarification! I had allergy testing done (skin prick, followed by some intradermal when nothing showed, follow by bloodwork (I assume it was IgE) - nothing showed up. So that gives me hope that indeed my intolerances are a symptom of bad bacteria/leaky gut - and will disappear when I take care of those issues.

GermanMia...you know, I can remember various times in my life when it seemed that I felt sick after everything I ate. I just didn't want to eat. I can remember at those times that I would try to eat apples or bananas - and those were the only things that made me feel better. I pondered what that meant - I was sure it meant my diet was awful (it was) and my body needed good nutrition (and not bread!). Then it would pass, and I would continue on eating poorly. This was before my gluten-free days.

Now my middle daughter is having the same issue. Seems to feel nauseous alot after eating, or her stomach hurts. She is gluten-free and compliant with the diet as she cannot function eating gluten. She is very sensitive to cross contamination and minute bits of gluten. Going gluten-free took care of the horrible headaches, fatigue, irritability, etc. But now it seems that some of the same symptoms are popping up again - and she is certain she hasn't eaten any gluten (honestly, I don't think she eats enough - but she doesn't feel like eating if she is just going to feel sick). I said to her this morning that maybe she wants to walk this path with me (we talk alot about food, diet) - maybe that would help. She said she just might, and if it works, that was just fine with her (doesn't matter about the food restrictions).

I am thinking she is only 16!!! How could so much be fouled up?? I am not opposed to having her walk with me on this path - except for how it relates to my DH - who I have not shared any of my thoughts with regarding my own diet. He is supportive of gluten-free eating, sees the difference it makes in both my daughters, believes it is a problem. But - I think he would see this as going overboard, what proof do we have that we need to do this, etc. I mean, when I started down this path I was convinced I had candida overgrowth and actually went on a candida diet for a year - and it turned out the bigger problem was gluten. So he remembers that, reminds me that what I originally thought was wrong, blah, blah, blah (BTW - while gluten was the bigger problem, that does not mean, in my mind - that candida wasn't part of the problem as well - it was just one piece of the puzzle). And I have to say that when I told him I was eliminating corn, dairy and eggs - his comments were along the lines of - why do you need to totally remove it? Maybe if you just limit it, just eat a little here and there. You don't have to totally cut eggs, why not just have them on the weekends?

Maybe he wouldn't respond that way, but who knows and I don't have the energy to try to educate him and bring him onboard with this - since it is for me and I'll be the one following it. It won't affect him in any way (except he won't have to be irritated by my constant throat clearing! ;) )

I feel more frustrated by what I see happening with my daughter. I am older, I don't go out much - so this is not a big crimp in my lifestyle. I see her struggling, I don't know why, I wish I could have confirmation from somewhere as to was specifically is going on with her, I wish we didn't have to guess. I mean, while candida was likely a piece to my puzzle (may still be) I was so focused on that, I missed the gluten connection. I feel like I have been going along hit and miss in search of feeling better.

My daughter is going to turn 16 this month. At this point I believe her to be old enough to be a participant in her health (as opposed to me just telling her what to do). I think I need to start pointing her in directions to read. I want her to have an understanding of what she is doing and why and she needs to have an opinion about this as well.

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Dawn, It sounds like you, and your daughter, would greatly benefit from it.

The diet was first developed for people with very severe inflammatory bowel disease like Chrone's, etc. It doesn't sound like you have those severe issues, just issues of things not being "right" and ups and downs.

It might help you to think about this diet as not a total for-life way of eating but give it a try for 3 months and then reevaluate after that. (one month isn't really enough time to have good healing happen). A short-term goal is easier to work toward and easier to accept mentally and emotionally. You are under no obligation to continue with it after that.

As far as your husband is concerned, he may not notice too much difference as the main meals that are SCD legal are very good. He can have his potatoes and rice (I fix those sides for my husband and I still fix gluten-free bread for his sandwiches - he's not gluten intolerant but eats gluten-free at home for my sake). And he really likes the almond-flour baked goods and coblers/pies, etc.

Right now there is always a pot of chicken/carrot soup on the stove. It is very good. I sometimes serve it as part of his meal, too. I don't tell him everything about the diet except that it is helping me.

It sounds like you have a diet buddy in your daughter - that would be so nice. (One can talk too much about these things at home and eventually bore family members with too much information even if they are supportive as my husband is.)

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The diet is actually quite good once you can eat most of the legal foods. It has forced me to be more creative and I have come up with some pretty delicious dishes. But it is certainly more fun with the baked yummies.:)

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It might help you to think about this diet as not a total for-life way of eating but give it a try for 3 months and then reevaluate after that. (one month isn't really enough time to have good healing happen). A short-term goal is easier to work toward and easier to accept mentally and emotionally. You are under no obligation to continue with it after that.

I think you are right - and just reading it that way relieves a lot of stress! (thanks :P ) I will be going to the book store this weekend to look at the book (BTVC) as well at the particular cook book I am interested in. My goal right now is to cut grains. Morning will be the last to go. I would like to be grain free through snacks, lunch and dinner. No boxed stuff (it all has grains in it anyway). And, I would like to start trying some SCD recipes (knowing I have choices and can cook different things relieves stress as well) - although I won't need much at first.

I don't tell him everything about the diet except that it is helping me.

It sounds like you have a diet buddy in your daughter - that would be so nice. (One can talk too much about these things at home and eventually bore family members with too much information even if they are supportive as my husband is.)

Yes, I think it would be easier to say (if asked) - just trying something different and it is helping (assuming it will help).

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Dawn, I think it is a 'man' thing to have to try and fix everything. My husband is like that - you know - the times you tell them about something that is bothering you and instead of giving you a hug which is what you really need, they have this tendency to give you a lecture on what you need to do about the situation (well, mine does anyway!) (and he wonders why I don't tell him anything!). Of course, his advice is usually totally irrelevant because he doesn't actually have a clue where you are coming from, and doesn't have the knowledge or understanding that you have acquired!

My husband did decide to try the gluten-free route with me but I think that was more because he hates being left out and thought I was having something 'special' that he didn't want to miss out on. Meanwhile of course, he has come to the realisation that he does actually feel better without it! I haven't got him round to SCD, but you never know.........

When I do our meals, I just add a baked potato to his meal. He has gluten-free bread and rice crackers, etc.

My daughter has suffered with mental issues and undoubtedly would benefit from being on the SCD, as would her little boys, our grandsons. I keep working on her and hoping that she will give it a try eventually. I think it is just a bit daunting for her. She wants to see me improve first. I would rather she didn't wait for that, but there you go........

My husband has done the 'well, you've changed your mind again - what is it this week' routine. I keep telling him that this is a process of elimination. Nothing is straightforward. In many different avenues of life we have to try different approaches before we can get things right. Even in the field of mechanisation, or flight, or speed. Things are often done on a trial and error basis. We know that certain plants are not edible because in the past people have tried them and found out to their cost! Life is a learning curve. If one thing doesn't work, then you have try something else.

Same with our health issues. We have certain 'known' elements. We know we are not well. We know that doctors can't find anything wrong with us. We know that certain foods disagree with us. Why? Most of us have got to the point of knowing that gluten is an issue. Why? We may drop the gluten and improve a bit but not enough or get worse again. Why? Is there some other factor in the equation - and so it goes on. bit by bit we start to unravel the puzzle. We have only got this far because we have questioning minds.

If we didn't try, we might as well curl up and die.

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... it is certainly more fun with the baked yummies.:)

Amen to that! Last night I was really REALLY craving something ELSE!

I'm used to at least munching on raw carrots and celery and all this COOKED FOOD is getting to me. I didn't eat anything SCD illegal or uncooked (although I was sorely tempted), but did have an almond flour muffin that was left in the freezer. I'm not supposed to have almond flour yet - that's 2 weeks away. But it was soooo good.

I'm back on track today and didn't suffer any setback in symptoms. If anything, I'm better.

My reward today is going to be a smoothie made with coconut yogurt, ripe banana and some canned pineapple (in it's own juice with no other additives). I'm suprised that hubby said he'd like a taste. He has been of the opinion that yogurt tastes bad, although he's never eaten any (go figure). :huh:

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What is it with men and yogurt? My husband is quite irrationally revolted by it and gets angry if I try and push him to have yogurt. He has the same phobia about cheese sauce, yet he will eat custard and cream without any problem. Perhaps he was forced to eat the stuff when a child or something - I haven't a clue, he won't say. I keep telling him how good it is but he won't touch it. Mind you, he does have it every now and again without knowing it, when it is mixed with other ingredients into tasty food and will eat it quite happily and obliviously - it's all psychological! He loves curry - I don't think he's twigged that it contains yogurt!

Shhh, don't tell him!

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On the rare occasion I ask Hubby to cook, he asks, "So what are you aloud to eat this week?" :P

He has been really good with me. I cannot complain. He has also learned that when I am just blowing steam, that I dont expect anything from him but a sounding board and a hug if I need it. He has changed A LOT since I met him. He has compromised and grown as a person way more than I have in the last 7 years. So giving credit where credit is due.

Hubby doenst like dairy either, so we are equally yoked there. He used to drink milk, but hated cheese and yogurt. He nixed the milk about a year ago due to chronic mucus when he drank it. Mucus all gone now.

I think I have tried EVERY variety of winter squash now. All are yummy and DH and DD both love them too. No one turns their nose up at SCD food. Hubby loves the SCD cherry/almond cookies I make. And the pumpkin muffins are a big hit with everyone. No one is going without.

Hubby says his poos come easier now....so we are all benefiting. :)

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DMarie, I've posted here before that a baking solution may be to try to find duck eggs. You may have no sensitivity to them due to no previous exposure.

There is some cross reacting that occurs when people are allergic to foods, so sometimes if you were rotating foods you could have duck egg on one day and chicken egg two days later.

I don't care for them as a pure egg dish as the flavor is slightly different, but they are fine in baked goods.

My DH is supportive, and will often take care of his own meal to spare me (when I am busy with work or feeling poorly) to save the food I can eat for me. He won't try my pureed carrot soup though! He is pleased with my progress recently. We recently made him some muffins with almonds I had bought locally and decided I couldn't use due to additives. He REALLY loved them! He would hardly try them before. He's aware of the expense of the food which is another reason he usually leaves it for me to eat.

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Dawn--just jump in with both feet and start the diet! If doing the intro sounds too intimidating then do what many of us have done, simply quit eating foods not on the diet. By the time Thanksgiving rolls around you won't miss the stuffing at all.

I have an aversion to holidays, birthdays and all sorts of get-togethers, not because I can't pig out at the buffet, but because for years I felt sick after eating on those occasions.

Start the diet, it may be the best Thanksgiving in years.

Sherry, you asked us to share our Thanksgining plans. I plan to fill in for a friend who wants to take the day off from her 24/7 business. She will be out of town. I will be working at things not related to food. I'll probably be happy eating chicken and carrrots for lunch. Make that turkey and squash.

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If anyone is still looking for duck eggs--I saw an ad for them on craig's list under farm and garden. You could post a duck eggs wanted notice there.

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Shay - thanks for the clarification! I had allergy testing done (skin prick, followed by some intradermal when nothing showed, follow by bloodwork (I assume it was IgE) - nothing showed up. So that gives me hope that indeed my intolerances are a symptom of bad bacteria/leaky gut - and will disappear when I take care of those issues.

GermanMia...you know, I can remember various times in my life when it seemed that I felt sick after everything I ate. I just didn't want to eat. I can remember at those times that I would try to eat apples or bananas - and those were the only things that made me feel better. I pondered what that meant - I was sure it meant my diet was awful (it was) and my body needed good nutrition (and not bread!). Then it would pass, and I would continue on eating poorly. This was before my gluten-free days.

Now my middle daughter is having the same issue. Seems to feel nauseous alot after eating, or her stomach hurts. She is gluten-free and compliant with the diet as she cannot function eating gluten. She is very sensitive to cross contamination and minute bits of gluten. Going gluten-free took care of the horrible headaches, fatigue, irritability, etc. But now it seems that some of the same symptoms are popping up again - and she is certain she hasn't eaten any gluten (honestly, I don't think she eats enough - but she doesn't feel like eating if she is just going to feel sick). I said to her this morning that maybe she wants to walk this path with me (we talk alot about food, diet) - maybe that would help. She said she just might, and if it works, that was just fine with her (doesn't matter about the food restrictions).

I am thinking she is only 16!!! How could so much be fouled up?? I am not opposed to having her walk with me on this path - except for how it relates to my DH - who I have not shared any of my thoughts with regarding my own diet. He is supportive of gluten-free eating, sees the difference it makes in both my daughters, believes it is a problem. But - I think he would see this as going overboard, what proof do we have that we need to do this, etc. I mean, when I started down this path I was convinced I had candida overgrowth and actually went on a candida diet for a year - and it turned out the bigger problem was gluten. So he remembers that, reminds me that what I originally thought was wrong, blah, blah, blah (BTW - while gluten was the bigger problem, that does not mean, in my mind - that candida wasn't part of the problem as well - it was just one piece of the puzzle). And I have to say that when I told him I was eliminating corn, dairy and eggs - his comments were along the lines of - why do you need to totally remove it? Maybe if you just limit it, just eat a little here and there. You don't have to totally cut eggs, why not just have them on the weekends?

Maybe he wouldn't respond that way, but who knows and I don't have the energy to try to educate him and bring him onboard with this - since it is for me and I'll be the one following it. It won't affect him in any way (except he won't have to be irritated by my constant throat clearing! ;) )

I feel more frustrated by what I see happening with my daughter. I am older, I don't go out much - so this is not a big crimp in my lifestyle. I see her struggling, I don't know why, I wish I could have confirmation from somewhere as to was specifically is going on with her, I wish we didn't have to guess. I mean, while candida was likely a piece to my puzzle (may still be) I was so focused on that, I missed the gluten connection. I feel like I have been going along hit and miss in search of feeling better.

My daughter is going to turn 16 this month. At this point I believe her to be old enough to be a participant in her health (as opposed to me just telling her what to do). I think I need to start pointing her in directions to read. I want her to have an understanding of what she is doing and why and she needs to have an opinion about this as well.

Dawn - if you buy the book BTVC, buy the one with the supplement "The Celiac Story". In that supplement Elaine points out that in the early stages of discovering reasons for celiac in children the idea was to remove all grains and starches. Only later scientific research found out about gluten and reactions to gluten and they limited the diagnosis celiac disease to only this specific reaction. That explains why a lot of celiacs don't completely recover when only eliminating gluten from their diet.

The point is just what my doc told me - that due to long time gluten exposure the gut flora changes and the whole digestive process is completely disturbed so that you never are able to restore the normal flora as long as you don't eliminate everything that feeds the wrong bacteria. Nausea and other symptoms specifically related to celiac may disappear (which happened in me with that nausea ceasing and my hair becoming thicker) but all the other problems might even get worse. If you go on gluten-free diet, you tend to eating more starches because gluten-free baking requires more starches, and you might start to have an overdose of strange grains which are aliens to your gut... Your already disturbed immune system gets completely confused, and at some point it may start reacting to just anything you eat.

So that is the vicious cycle which you have to break. My doc never had heard of the SCD before and as a typical German who has either her rolls or her musli for breakfast she found it quite difficult to do such a diet, but it absolutely made sense to her.

Maybe your daughter would like reading her way through Naomi Devlin's beautiful blog - especially the part where she tells how she came round to SCD. When I read that I really nearly cried because it sounded so much like my own story and I was so glad to have found a way out of this misery... And I really wish I would have found something like that 20 years ago! The story is here: milkforthemorningcake.blogspot.com/2008/03/slow-dawning-of-terrible-truth.html

Perhaps she can do what pele said, just jump into the diet skipping the intro. I'm quite sure she will feel the difference quickly and then she'll be happy to have a diet she can follow which makes her feel good.

I know it's difficult to go out while following such a diet - but I suppose your daughter isn't having much fun now when she goes out and has normal food... it can't get worse.

She also might read those cookbooks - the people who wrote those books are people who suffered themselves and now share their ways to get out of their misery. They have tips how to manage going out, too, which is very helpful.

Like you I think your daughter is old enough to have understanding for this subject, and take responsibility for her own health. You're old enough to drive a car at this age, so if you can take responsibility for an engine and what that engine could cause in traffic, you certainly should be able to take responsibility for your own life. You wouldn't want to hurt other people, either, so no reason to start hurting yourself.

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Yogurt making in a crockpot is the way I'm going to go. I bought an extension cord that has a dimmer switch on it (made for dimming a lamp - you plug the cord in the socket, and the appliance plugs into that).

I spent a couple days experimenting with the dial setting on the dimmer cord and the crockpot on low, filled with water with two water-filled quart jars in the water. I finally found the setting that kept the water inside the jars at 100-105 degrees F (used a meat thermometer to test the temp). Then marked the place on the dial so I don't have to experiment again.

Artgirl - how much milk, how much starter? I bought a dimmer for my crockpot since my heating pad had an auto shutoff which was a pain to remember to keep turning on. I can't seem to find amounts. I am using Dannon yogurt as my starter this first time. Got the crockpot going with water in it, monitoring the temp. Just need the amounts so I can get started! :D

Thank you for the encouragement (everyone!)... I am noticing some difference in the amount of mucous I have just from a few modifications made. Not a problem to leave grains behind in the dust if I feel better! I am not so worried about timing at this point. There is plenty to eat, I won't feel deprived! I don't have to have replacements for what I take out (I think many expect to find replacements that taste the same as what they remember a favorite food tasting). That is of great help. If one is looking to replace what was taken out exactly - disappointment follows - but if one is open to new culinary delights - so much easier.

I ordered the book on amazon this morning (it has the Celiac Story included). I went to Barnes and Noble last night to do some reading. Very interesting that the original focus for celiac was based on removing grains! I also ordered a cookbook after perusing several. I also bought some chicken and carrots to make chicken soup! :-)

GermanMia - thanks for the link for the blog. I will give to my daugher and read as well. Plus - the book... :P

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Artgirl - how much milk, how much starter? I bought a dimmer for my crockpot since my heating pad had an auto shutoff which was a pain to remember to keep turning on. I can't seem to find amounts. I am using Dannon yogurt as my starter this first time. Got the crockpot going with water in it, monitoring the temp. Just need the amounts so I can get started!

Here's the quick answer. I'll try to find the place where I found instructions for coconut milk yogurt.

I have a small crockpot which will hold only two small mason jars (about 1-2/3 cups each). So that's all I can make at one time. Each jar holds the amount of one can of coconut milk plus the added yogurt starter.

I use two 13.5 fl. oz. cans of coconut milk (no preservatives, but do contain guar gum - not ready yet to make from scratch).

I add 1/4 cup commercial yogurt as a starter, and 1/2 cup from my own for the next batch.

1T honey (today I added 2T so the yogurt would be a bit sweeter)

2 tsp gelatin (not necessary, but since the yogurt turns out thinnish, the gelatin helps set it up some - I'm still adjusting the amount of gelatin but raising the amount 1 tsp at a time)

Again, I'll try to get you the full instructions.

Now that I've perfected the process, I'll be looking for a larger crockpot so I can make a larger batch and not have to make it so often (about every-other day right now). And, I want enough to drip so I can make a thick "cream cheese".

OK - here's one of the links from activelowcarb forum by member NancyLC

http://forums.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=287507

Non-dairy yogurt Recipe

I have a Salton Yogurt maker that makes 1 quart of yogurt, so this recipe fits that yogurt maker nicely.

Here's the steps one takes for making anything into "yogurt".

1) Kill the bad bacteria in your starting medium (milk, coconut milk, whatever). For non-milk products you can usually just boil it.

2) Add gelatin or pectin if you want it to get a yogurt like consistency, otherwise, if it isn't milk, it'll have more of a kefir like consistency. A thick liquid.

3) Add your bacteria food (something with sugars in it, like 1Tbl honey, pureed pineaple or banana). Mix well.

4) Cool to 90-100 degrees.

5) Add culture and incubate for 4-24 hours.

6) Pour into a clean container and refrigerate until it sets up.

================================================

Ok, specific to Coconut Milk yogurt:

I use 2 cans of coconut milk. Make sure you get some without perservative. I get mine at Trader Joe's. It is a "light" brand. I haven't tried it yet with a full fat brand. I want to try it though.

I use 1 or slightly less than 1 packet of gelatin. It gets a bit too jello-like with a full packet, so maybe 3/4 or 3/5 of a packet is better.

You can just leave out the gelatin and it is like kefir and makes a mean smoothie with a little lemon juice and sweetner!

What's it taste like? Well, less sour than milk yogurt. I think it tastes a little like coconut still, but it has a great tang to it. I recommend going a full 24 hours because it doesn't get that terribly tangy and you'll get more of the beneficial bacteria per serving.

I got the idea for this from a web site (I don't have the URL) where the woman described making yogurt from cashews and water. So you can see, that you can "yogurtize" almost anything given the right temperatures, bacteria and give them something to eat so they can reproduce.

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Here's instructions on making nut milk yogurts. They cite the original article as being from pecanbread.com, but I wasn't able to find it there quite as quickly as this site.

http://www.austinscdfriends.com/articles/a...00966/59609.htm

I'm not sure about needing to sterilize canned coconut milk but I bring it to a boil just to be on the safe side so that I'm not introducing any rogue bacteria. It has to be heated for the honey and gelatin to disolve anyway. I also sterilize the jars in boiling water.

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Hmmm....no telling how mine will turn out. :unsure:

We are having computer troubles, so I was unable to get back on the internet until now. So I dug through the tons of stuff I have printed out and came up with something that seemed to indicate that I would use 2 quarts milk to 1/2 cup Dannon yogurt. And that was it. I did not add honey or anything. I was anxious to get something going, and didn't think I was going to be able to get back online and check. ;) Makes sense something should be added to feed the bacteria - but nothing anywhere seems to mention that!!! Of course, it might not mention it because yogurt starter is used - and maybe that already has something in it to feed the bacteria.

So now I am pondering whether to let it keep going, because neither the crockpot or heating pad is working that great. :( The crockpot is too warm even on just the warm setting - and the dimmer doesn't seem to make a difference to that. The heating pad is probably okay - but it a shuts off automatically every 2 hours. I will not be getting up every 2 hours to turn it back on. I have 4 one pint jars in my bigger crockpot on the heating pad right now. I have a slightly smaller crockpot with water and 2 one pint jars filled with water sitting on my other counter, plugged in on the dimmer on the lowest it will go with the setting on warm, with the lid off. The temp seems to be holding steady between 110 and 115. But - the lid had to be off.

I don't know - I will probably move the yogurt to the smaller crockpot, set on warm, overnight. Otherwise it will not stay warm enough.

At this point I am not expecting anything at this point. :unsure: I think my next stop will be Target to get a yogurt maker. They have one that has positive reviews on the Target site - and I like that it uses glass jars. I don't want plastic. Trying to stay away from heated plastic. I just don't seem to have any other way to keep a water bath temp stable.

Meanwhile, I think I will stop back at Barnes and Noble tomorrow and look through the books they have there on SCD - and write down the yogurt recipes!!!

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Dawn,

Well, I hope at least one of the yogurt methods works. Too bad about the dimmer.

I believe that the honey does give the bacteria something to eat as there is none, or not much, natural sugars in coconut milk.

Funny thing, though, with my dimmer. The dial has a little red indicator light on it - slide the button one way and the light dims, slide it the other way and it lights up bright. Now, you would think that the direction toward the brighter light would be "hi" and the side toward the dimmer light would be "low". After getting VERY CONFUSED about the setting, I unplugged the crockpot and plugged in a lamp. Low and behold, the dial is just the opposite. A dim light gives higher power and a bright light gives less power. After I found this out I was able to make the adjustments much better. With the crockpot on low and the lid on, the dimmer is set near the low end and I get around 105 inside the jars and 110 in the water bath.

However, a yogurt maker would certainly be easier all round.

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I am going to have to check out my dimmer! Maybe it works the same way. I would love to NOT have to purchase something else.

I did use whole milk - so hopefully it will work. I am hoping to not have a reaction to it (milk sometimes bothers me now - with alot of gas plus I think it affects the mucous production). I would like to try to coconut yogurt though as it also sounds yummy. ;)

Okay, so today I ate the last of my pumpkin waffles for breakfast, but no grain the rest of the day. But I am hungry right now! Tomorrow I will make some chicken soup. I had chicken for lunch (not legal, bought a rotisserie chicken while out). I cut up some apple and cooked on the stovetop with a little bit of honey, cinnamon and nutmet (and pecans - I am used to eating nuts as fillers - which I will need to back off of). Then I had spaghetti squash with some homemade spaghetti sauce (again, not legal as I used canned tomatoe sauce). Somewhere in there I had a few slices of bacon as well (Hormel naturals, no preservatives but does use turbinado sugar). Oh - and a banana as well.

Now I am wondering what to eat? Trying to stay out of the grains. I am not craving grains - just hungry and wanting to eat!

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Now I am wondering what to eat? Trying to stay out of the grains. I am not craving grains - just hungry and wanting to eat!

Go to www.pecanbread.com and check out the legal food list and recipes. Lots of help there on what to eat.

Also, www.scdrecipe.com - lots and lots of great recipes.

I'm still coming off the intro so am still eating a lot of chicken/carrot soup and other well cooked vegetables and some cooked fruit. Not much variety yet, but looking forward to moving up to some more foods.

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Funny thing, though, with mine. The dial has a little red indicator light on it - slide the button one way and the light dims, slide it the other way and it lights up bright. Now, you would think that the direction toward the brighter light would be "hi" and the side toward the dimmer light would be "low". After getting VERY CONFUSED about the setting, I unplugged the crockpot and plugged in a lamp. Low and behold, the dial is just the opposite. A dim light gives higher power and a bright light gives less power. After I found this out I was able to make the adjustments much better. With the crockpot on low and the lid on, the dimmer is set near the low end and I get around 105 inside the jars and 110 in the water bath.

I am so glad you gave me that tip - I went and checked mine - and it operates the same way!! Who know?? B) I had it set on high, and not low. So, I now have it plugged into my tester crock (the smaller one) - on low with warm chosen on the crockpot. We will see.

Though from everything I read, if I transfer the jars, I have to be very careful and not jiggle the jars or it might not set right.

Who am I kidding?! This first try has disaster written all over it! ;)

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Here's how I managed to make yogurt out of stuff I already had

I used a large stainless pot. I can fit 4 large mouth quart mason jars inside. I put the heating pad under it on Medium. You'll have to find a heating pad that doesn't automatically cut off.

Then I fill the pot 3/4 with water at about 105 degrees F. Just enough to cover the jars almost all the way without flowing over.

After I get all the different milks ready, I put them in the pot and put the lid on. I can do 4 different kinds at one time this way.

The last time I used 1/2 and 1/2 in one and a sour cream type consistency came out of it which was really good on top of my turkey chili!

I bought a $50 yogurt maker but realized that it does not keep the temperatures inside as low as they state. It rose to 120 which is too hot. I even vented the lid and could not get the temp to be between 100 to 110. So I took it back to the store. When I researched them, I found that this was a common problem with most yogurt makers.

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Glad I could help, Dawn.

I tested the water temp, fine-tuning the dimmer setting, for a couple days with just water in it and in the jars. With the milk in the jars I did have to move the setting it just a couple hair-widths higher.

I bought a $50 yogurt maker but realized that it does not keep the temperatures inside as low as they state. It rose to 120 which is too hot. I even vented the lid and could not get the temp to be between 100 to 110. So I took it back to the store. When I researched them, I found that this was a common problem with most yogurt makers.

Well, that just reinforces my using the crockpot method and not spend any money on a yogurt maker. I didn't want to have to find a place in my kitchen for another appliance anyway.

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